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jerryking : mass_media   23

‘Math men’ not mad men rule advertising’s data age, says Lévy
May 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Anna Nicolaou.

Maurice Levy: 'The future [of advertising] is based on data. It is not based on any mass media.' We know that mass media is [declining] every day,” “And if an advertising agency wants to have a future, data is absolutely indispensable.”

the advertising industry was undergoing a “metamorphosis” that required big bets.......As consumers shift attention away from pricey television commercials and towards the internet, where Facebook and Google dominate, the industry is more “math men” than mad men......In light of digital disruption Publicis, the world’s third-largest advertising agency by revenues, has made a big bet on data. In April the company made its largest acquisition with the purchase of Epsilon, a digital marketing company owned by Alliance Data Systems......Like its rivals WPP and Omnicom, Publicis is under pressure as Facebook and Google have disintermediated the traditional agency model. The two tech groups account for two-thirds of digital advertising sales in the US.....The industry has been consolidating as traditional agencies look to position themselves as data analytics gurus who can help brands target shoppers online. Last year Interpublic bought data business Acxiom for $2bn, while just last month buzzy agency Droga5 sold itself to Accenture......Despite lingering fears that an economic slowdown is looming, “the situation is much better now,”.... making the Epsilon decision easier. “The fastest-growing segment in our industry is data, technology, internet. Period. All the rest is suffering.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  decline  disruption  disintermediation  Epsilon  Facebook  Google  Interpublic  Mad_Men  marketing  mass_media  mathematics  Maurice_Lévy  Omnicom  Publicis  WPP 
may 2019 by jerryking
Vertical media mergers are just so 19th century | Financial Times
June 21, 2018 | Financial Times | Anne-Marie Slaughter.

Media companies are falling over themselves to merge with one another right now. AT&T took the US to court over the right to buy TimeWarner, and Comcast and Disney are engaged in a bidding war for some of 21st Century Fox. Big looks set to get bigger. Yet according to our best thinkers on the future of capitalism, the corporate titans driving these decisions are heading firmly backward.

AT&T and Comcast are communications companies that are attempting to go vertical and control every layer of a media empire from underground cables to the creation of content....Andrew Carnegie was determined to own coal mines and railroads as well as steel mills. The goal was control from top to bottom, closed access and economies of scale.

But that is old-fashioned thinking, according to the current crop of books on the dramatic economic changes being wreaked in the next phase of the information age. They argue that vertical integration amounts to building silos in an era that will be dominated by platforms — owning in an era of renting — and looking for mass markets when customers want individualized products.

Hemant Taneja makes a strong case for “customised microproduction and finely targeted marketing” in his book Unscaled. An investor for the Boston-based firm General Catalyst, he does not question the value of having many customers rather than few. But he argues that fast-growing companies in sectors ranging from energy to healthcare and education are succeeding because they customise their goods and services to a “market of one”.

The rise of artificial intelligence and cloud computing allows these companies to “rent scale”, he writes. Small, nimble companies can now out-compete big ones in specific markets, adding scale as they need to.....Netflix’s market value exceeded that of Comcast back in May and it is now bigger than Disney. Its global headcount is 5,500, nearly one-fifth of Time Warner’s and one-50th of AT&T’s. Netflix does not have the size to build as large in-house AI capabilities. But a quick search for “media data analytics” reveals a score of companies. Why pay for that capability when you can rent it
Andrew_Carnegie  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  artificial_intelligence  books  cloud_computing  end_of_ownership  entertainment_industry  Netflix  platforms  scaling  size  vertical_integration  AT&T  Comcast  customization  Disney  gazelles  nimbleness  mass_media  personalization  mergers_&_acquisitions  21st_Century_Fox  Time_Warner  19th_century  microproducers  target_marketing  unscalability  silo_mentality 
june 2018 by jerryking
Disney Makes $52.4 Billion Deal for 21st Century Fox in Big Bet on Streaming
DEC. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES.

The Walt Disney Company said on Thursday that it had reached a deal to buy most of the assets of 21st Century Fox, the conglomerate controlled by Rupert Murdoch, in an all-stock transaction valued at roughly $52.4 billion.

While the agreement is subject to the approval of antitrust regulators — and the Justice Department recently moved to block a big media company from becoming even bigger — the once unthinkable acquisition promises to reshape Hollywood and Silicon Valley. It is the biggest counterattack from a traditional media company against the tech giants that have aggressively moved into the entertainment business.

Disney now has enough muscle to become a true competitor to Netflix, Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook in the fast-growing realm of online video.
Disney  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  streaming  mass_media  antitrust  21st_Century_Fox  Department_of_Justice 
december 2017 by jerryking
LeBron James’s Media Empire Is Doing Way Better Than His Team - WSJ
By Ben Cohen
Updated June 7, 2017

Uninterrupted, is a media startup founded by Cleveland star LeBron James and his business partner Maverick Carter, and backed by more than $15 million from Time Warner Inc.’s Warner Bros. studio and Turner Sports unit......it's a way of connecting professional athletes with professional writers, producers and directors who could help them say what they wanted to say.......It’s the latest evolution of a movement in which athletes, celebrities and other public figures are using social media and other technology to control their images and communicate directly with the public. In the process, they are loosening traditional media’s grip on the way sports is delivered and consumed. James, Carter and their partners are betting some of the most compelling sports content in the shifting entertainment landscape will be created by the athletes themselves.....Uninterrupted’s multimedia offerings include full-length documentaries, web series and a growing podcast network. Some of its shows have been licensed by traditional media outlets such as Fox Sports, which broadcast an Uninterrupted documentary about a mixed martial-arts fighter. Shows also appear on YouTube, Instagram and Uninterrupted’s own website.
athletes_&_athletics  content  digital_media  documentaries  entertainment  entrepreneur  Fox_Sports  gatekeepers  Instagram  LeBron_James  mass_media  multiplatforms  personal_branding  podcasts  sports  user_generated  Warner_Bros.  YouTube 
june 2017 by jerryking
In House of Murdoch, Sons Set About an Elaborate Overhaul
APRIL 22, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES and SYDNEY EMBER.

With James and his elder brother, Lachlan, 45, who is the executive chairman of 21st Century Fox, firmly entrenched as their father’s successors, they are now forcibly exerting themselves. Their father remains very involved, but his sons seem determined to rid the company of its roguish, old-guard internal culture and tilt operations toward the digital future. They are working to make the family empire their own, not the one the elder Murdoch created to suit his sensibilities.....The conglomerate, like its competitors, is facing an extremely uncertain future. Consumers are canceling or forgoing cable hookups and instead subscribing to streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, which 21st Century Fox co-owns. The movie business continues to grapple with piracy, rising costs and flat domestic attendance. Fox also has special problems: With competitors getting bigger — AT&T’s $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner being Exhibit A — where does that leave the Murdochs?

“That’s a question I think they asked themselves and moved them to try to buy the rest of Sky,” said Michael Nathanson, an analyst at MoffettNathanson, referring to a pending $14.3 billion deal for 21st Century Fox to take full control of the British satellite TV giant.

At the moment, 21st Century Fox’s portfolio is relatively healthy. Fox News has continued to dominate in the ratings. The FX cable channel has found a steady stream of hits, including “Atlanta” and “The People v. O. J. Simpson.” The Fox broadcast network has struggled to find new must-see shows, but the company’s overseas channels and sports networks are thriving. In its most recent quarter, 21st Century Fox reported income of $856 million, a 27 percent increase from the same period a year earlier.
succession  Rupert_Murdoch  CATV  conglomerates  uncertainty  Netflix  Hulu  James_Murdoch  Lachlan_Murdoch  family-owned_businesses  Bill_O'Reilly  organizational_culture  sexual_harassment  Roger_Ailes  generational_change  digital_media  National_Geographic  CEOs  21st_Century_Fox  mass_media 
april 2017 by jerryking
Oxford Diary
4 March / 5 March | Financial Times | Madhumita Murgia.

The goals is to build a conversation around change, to make technological change less scary, to make sure people don't feel left behind because of technology---do this within 26 hrs.....In the Cotswolds, too, senior British media executive tells me his own experience of working with YouTubers "was more like a one-night stand than a marriage". "We use each other for numbers and legitimacy, but the question is will they ever understand the subtler issues of traditional programming? Rules? Political correctness?.....A government adviser tells me that they are afraid that AI will change the relationship between state and citizen....Algorithms helping governments make important social decisions. Algorithms are a kind of black box and that government many not be able to explain its choices when questioned.
Google  future  conferences  change  handpicked  entrepreneur  ISIS  civil_servants  algorithms  YouTube  mass_media  digital_media  artificial_intelligence  biases  value_judgements  large_companies  print_journalism  technological_change  cultural_clash 
march 2017 by jerryking
We’re All Cord Cutters Now - WSJ
By FRANK ROSE
Sept. 6, 2016

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing By Michael D. Smith and Rahul Telang
MIT Press, 207 pages, $29.95

The authors’ point is not that the long tail is where the money is, though that can be the case. It’s that “long-tail business models,” being inherently digital, can succeed where others do not. Mass-media businesses have always depended on the economics of scarcity: experts picking a handful of likely winners to be produced with a professional sheen, released through a tightly controlled series of channels and supported by blowout ad campaigns. This, the authors make clear, is a strategy for the previous century.
book_reviews  books  digital_media  entertainment_industry  massive_data_sets  Amazon  Netflix  data  granularity  cord-cutting  clarity  Anita_Elberse  The_Long_Tail  business_models  blockbusters  Apple  mass_media 
january 2017 by jerryking
Pillars of Black Media, Once Vibrant, Now Fighting for Survival - The New York Times
JULY 2, 2016 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER and NICHOLAS FANDOS.

As racial issues have once again become a prominent topic in the national conversation, the influence of black-owned media companies on black culture is diminishing.

“Ebony used to be the only thing black folks had and read,” Ms. Spann-Cooper said. “As we became more integrated into society, we had other options.”

Continue reading the main story
To that end, Time Inc. now owns the magazine Essence and Viacom owns Black Entertainment Television. The Oprah Winfrey Network, a partnership between Ms. Winfrey and Discovery Communications, has been around since 2011. The Undefeated, ESPN’s site covering the intersection of race and sports, debuted in May. The emergence of Black Twitter has also given African-Americans a powerful voice on social media.

Johnson Publishing stressed that the Clear View Group, the private equity firm that bought Jet and Ebony, was an African-American-led company and positioned the sale more as a partnership. “...Traditional media companies have struggled for years to adapt to a digital world, but the pressure on black-owned media has been even more acute. Many are smaller and lack the financial resources to compete in an increasingly consolidated media landscape. Advertisers have turned away from black-oriented media, owners say, under the belief that they can now reach minorities in other ways.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
See my Pinboard reference to [Carol Williams' concern] that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
African-Americans  owners  digital_media  mass_media  FCC  broadcasting  publishing  consolidation  television  culture  magazines  radio  black-owned  Carol_Williams  Essence  Ebony  print_journalism 
july 2016 by jerryking
Digital Lessons From the Museum and Art World
OCTOBER 27, 2014 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

....institutions are using digital technology and data not just for marketing and social media, but also to enrich the museum experience for visitors, reach new audiences online and transform scholarly research. And there are also new kinds of art being made with digital tools and data....How do you intelligently use digital technology to enhance your business rather than being overrun by it? The physical and the digital sides of your business should work together, so that your investments in the physical world remain a powerful asset.

That fundamental challenge for museums is similar to the one facing retailers, manufacturers, consumer goods makers and perhaps traditional media companies. (More than one museum official I interviewed talked about the importance of being a “content manager.”) The museum curators and administrators seemed to have a clear notion of the need for balance — that just as we all increasingly live in a world that is a blend of the physical and digital, so too institutions of all kinds must learn to operate in a blended, hybrid environment.
art  atoms_&_bits  content  CPG  cyberphysical  digital_media  digital_strategies  manufacturers  mass_media  museums  physical_assets  physical_world  retailers  Steve_Lohr 
october 2014 by jerryking
The second coming of Dean Blundell - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 16 2014

Over the past few years, a number of American media figures, from journalists Andrew Sullivan, Glenn Greenwald and Matt Taibbi to standup comic Louis C.K., have ventured from the safety of their homes in legacy media organizations to develop new online businesses based on their individual brands. Liberated from the lumbering mother ships that often typify mainstream media, they have built passionate communities of followers devoted to the notion of freer expression and deeper engagement in specific subjects. As Blundell joins the wave, he could be among the first Canadians to leverage a personal brand born of old media into an online-only venture.

The timing may be on his side. Commercial radio stations in Canada continue to be money spinners. In 2012, the last year for which full data are available, the industry’s profit margin before interest and taxation (PBIT) was 19.9 per cent; in Toronto, that reached 41.1 per cent. But in the U.S., conventional radio is beginning to lose listeners to streaming music services (which last year accounted for 7 per cent of radio listening there). There are hints that radio in Canada is also dropping off; certainly, it does not dominate the cultural agenda. And no one of Blundell’s stature in this country is currently producing a regular standalone podcast.
radio  entrepreneur  digital_media  personal_branding  online-only  Simon_Houpt  podcasting  mass_media  standalone 
may 2014 by jerryking
Venerable Format of ‘NewsHour’ Struggles With New Era of Media - NYTimes.com
By ELIZABETH JENSEN
Published: June 13, 2013

With a deep financing crisis forcing layoffs and other cutbacks this week, some public television employees believe that PBS NewsHour's current format — and a general unwillingness to embrace the digital realities facing journalism — may be jeopardizing the program’s future.... The pressures facing “NewsHour” are not unique. “What every traditional media organization is confronted with today is how to change profoundly to reflect the revolution in how people consume media,” said a former CNN bureau chief, Frank Sesno, now director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. But many organizations have moved more quickly to adapt, equipping producers with inexpensive video cameras to reduce news gathering costs, and investing in online and mobile platforms.

Mr. Sesno said that he “desperately” wants “NewsHour” to succeed. “They’ve got to figure out how to do the deeper dive and bring people along with them,” he said, by developing more of a conversation with the audience and becoming a “multimedia information experience. You can’t just be a TV show anymore.”
PBS  television  digital_media  layoffs  cutbacks  mass_media  billgates  philanthropy  journalism  digital_strategies  news  multimedia  interactivity 
june 2013 by jerryking
Helping Hand for Time’s Print Empire
July 29, 2012 | NYT | By AMY CHOZICK.

Lang has homed in on the transition to mobile devices and the customizing of ads for marketers based on the vast amount of consumer data Time Inc. collects on readers. Her theory: if users’ personal information is a treasure trove for Silicon Valley businesses, it should be equally valuable to traditional media. ....Ms. Lang talks about Time Inc. not as a magazine publisher, but as a branded news and entertainment company. She believes she can sell digital products to advertisers tailored to a level of specificity not previously available....As the Digitas chief she turned a traditional direct-mail service into a business that built and placed digital ad campaigns customized for Web sites and social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook. She also helped start the “newfronts” that take place around the time of the TV network’s upfronts, where advertisers see the coming slate of TV shows, and connect advertisers to online companies like YouTube and Hulu....the focus seems to be on tailoring the company’s magazine properties around the digital consumer. Driving that plan is a trove of research that breaks down readers’ daily news cycle. The “Arc of the Day” study showed that in the morning readers want bite-size headlines and news flashes. In the afternoon, they are often at a desktop computer and want to grab a slide show or video, and at night they have time to engage in a deeper article. A related study also found that the average smartphone owner spends 1.4 hours a day waiting in line while browsing a device....Time Inc. had previously resisted a deal with Apple in part because it did not want to give up its control of subscriber data to the technology company.

But the deal fits Ms. Lang’s favorite refrain: “We need to be where our consumers are.”
magazines  digital_media  profile  CEOs  mass_media  data_driven  Publicis  advertising  TIME_Inc.  news  dayparting  print_journalism 
july 2012 by jerryking
Degree Of Challenge
May 1, 2003 | American Demographics |Byline: SANDRA YIN

Despite modest individual earnings, college students as a whole represent a multibillion dollar market. The allure for marketers is the opportunity to lock in relationships with the future's more affluent consumers while they are still in school, when they are open to experimenting with products and sharing their opinions with their peers. The first step is to understand college students' attitudes and purchasing behavior. Today, among the most cost-effective media for reaching students on campus is the old college newspaper. At least 72% of college students report having read one of the past five issues. In addition to traditional media, guerrilla marketing, or viral marketing, has proven effective in spurring word of mouth. College students are trendsetters and early adopters who may be a first step to reaching broader market segments. Though marketers may encounter challenges as they build relationships with these young adults before they begin their financial ascent, the trouble may well be worth it.
Colleges_&_Universities  students  challenges  mass_media  guerrilla_marketing  millennials  buying_power  purchase_decisions  locked_in 
july 2012 by jerryking
The 21st century's Hiroshima ProQuest
Aug 6, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.17 | Preston ManningThe same science that can be used to develop genetically-based cures for human diseases can also be used to produce mutated smallpox bacteria or influenza viruses even more virulent than their predecessors and highly resistant to any known treatment. And if the sun of human progress should again become obscured by the storm clouds of war -- war itself transformed by the increasing scope and sophistication of terrorism -- how long will it be before the plan for utilizing mutated viruses and terrorist-induced pandemics as instruments of mass destruction appears on the underground blackboard of some terrorist cell capable of implementing it?

The third pebble

What exactly is the most disruptive and lethal dimension of the "dark side" of the life sciences -- the genetic equivalent of the first A-bomb -- and how might this destructive force be delivered to target populations to accomplish the political purposes of those desiring to unleash it?

While a terrorist attack on military or civilian populations utilizing such techniques would have immediate impacts on public health, the greater damage to human life and society will most likely be through the panic and terror that such a biological attack or pandemic will trigger throughout the general population. And this panic won't be transmitted by air, water, or utility system, but by the mass-communications network of 21st-century society, in particular the electronic media of radio, television, the Internet, cell phones, and personal computing devices. It is the electronic mass media that will most likely prove to be the B-29s of the age of genetics and bioterrorism.
life_sciences  genetics  viruses  ProQuest  Preston_Manning  21st._century  terrorism  threats  WWI  WWII  bioterrorism  panics  mass_media  virulence  pandemics  digital_media  dark_side 
october 2011 by jerryking
A good PR consultant is worth paying for: The Entrepreneur
08 Dec 2010 | FT| Luke. Johnson. Having owned PR firms, I
know it can be an attractive investment. Clients are on contracts with
monthly retainers, so no feast & famine of advertising campaigns.
Expenses are staff & premises. A consumer PR agency should generate
20 % net profit margins on revenue; a financial PR agency 30 %.

PR is one of the few segments of the marketing services industry that
has benefited from the digital revolution. Most participants, including
advertising agencies, media buying shops and design houses, have
suffered, as spend on traditional media such as TV and press has been
squeezed....The growing importance of PR in business and society is
exemplified by the power of kings of the trade such as Alan Parker at
Brunswick and Roland Rudd at Finsbury. Both have incredible connections
in the City, Wall Street, industry & politics. The sector has moved
on from spin to embrace communications with investors, regulators,
politicians and other discreet audiences.
Luke_Johnson  public_relations  ProQuest  mass_media  Finsbury  Wall_Street  professional_service_firms  margins  Communicating_&_Connecting  investors  regulators  politicians  financial_communications  digital_revolution 
august 2011 by jerryking
Document Page: The Evolving Mission Of Google
Carr, David
The New York Times
03-21-2011
"There is no doubt in my mind they are becoming a media company," said
Mike Vorhaus, the president of the media consulting firm Magid Advisors.
"They are providing content to consumers and selling ads against it --
sounds like a media company to me."

So what, you might ask. What difference does it make what occupation
Google writes down on its driver's license?

For starters, being in the media business means looking at media a
little differently. Google has been spending a lot of time and some
significant money trying to help traditional media businesses stay in
business, in part because Google does not want its search engines to
crawl across a wasteland of machine-generated info-spam and amateur
content with limited allure.
Google  Hal_Varian  Netflix  competitive_landscape  mass_media  media  YouTube  strategy  sports  content  David_Carr  digital_media  layer_mastery 
march 2011 by jerryking
Technology and the End of Trend
DECEMBER 21, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By TERRY TEACHOUT.
The big culture-related news of the Decade Without a Name is that it
will likely be remembered less for its art than for the inventions that
put the art into circulation...Every generation had its hot artists and
styles, and everyone agreed on who and what was hot. No more....Instead
of trends, we have ripples, fad-like spasms of collective interest that
seem to subside almost before they begin, leaving no trace behind them.

What put an end to trend? The biggest change has been the role played by
the mass media in the development and dissemination of new styles of
art.
trends  technology  art  mass_media  noughties 
december 2009 by jerryking
How does U.S. democracy survive without its newspapers?
Tuesday, Jun. 16, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | by John Ibbotson.

The Globe has also still been spared the savage budget cuts that eviscerated so many once-great American newspapers as the recession accelerated chronic declines in readership and advertising revenue.

But in the U.S., it's time to ask: How will the seemingly inevitable extinction of many metropolitan daily newspapers influence politics and political culture there?

The answer isn't entirely grim. Some newspapers are bound to survive in print form, at least for a few more years, as competition thins and enlightened corporate owners recognize that laying off half their reporters is the surest way to destroy the only thing of value a newspaper has: the reputation behind its name.....there is another, very disturbing, trend. A recent survey by The Pew Center for the People and the Press reported that "a new Washington media have evolved, but they are far from the more egalitarian or citizen-based media that advocates of the digital age might imagine. Instead, this new Washington media cohort is one substantially aimed at elites, often organized by industry, by corporate client, or by niche political interest."

These publications may have an audience of a few thousand, or even a few hundred, willing to pay thousands of dollars in subscription fees for specialized coverage. "These are publications with names like ClimateWire, Energy Trader, Traffic World, Government Executive and Food and Chemical News," the Pew study says. They are proliferating, and hoovering up reporters and editors who have lost their jobs in mainstream media. "Today, it is the niche, not the mainstream, media that [provide]blanket coverage of Congress and other important arms of the federal government," the Pew report concludes.

The collapse of print journalism - network newscasts are also in terrible shape - threatens to bifurcate the public square. Those who know the power of information will pay to obtain it, and use that knowledge to influence the agenda.

Those who lack the means or interest will depend on blogs, social networking and whatever information they choose to look for online. How does democracy survive on that?
brands  budget_cuts  commonwealth  decline  democracy  engaged_citizenry  influence  information_sources  Inside_the_Beltway  John_Ibbitson  local_journalism  magazines  mass_media  market_intelligence  newsletters  newspapers  niches  political_culture  politics  print_journalism  reputation  sophisticated  Washington_D.C. 
june 2009 by jerryking
Media Pros Venture Into Funding - WSJ.com
MAY 12, 2008 WSJ article byJESSICA E. VASCELLARO and REBECCA
BUCKMAN about Velocity Interactive Group that specializes in funding
digital media start-ups that aim to disrupt traditional media and
business models. Velocity added financial heft by merging in December
with a Silicon Valley investment firm, ComVentures, which had $1.5
billion under management but had struggled with partner turnover.
Harnessing ComVentures' most recent $300 million fund, the new entity,
which uses the Velocity name, has announced six investments in Internet
video and publishing companies. A $25 million investment in an Internet
animation and production concern, Fuse+Media, is to be announced in
coming days. (For Heather Hutchinson)
investors  vc  digital_media  Velocity_Interactive_Group  disruption  business_models  funding  venture_capital  Rebecca_Buckman  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  digital_disruption  mass_media 
february 2009 by jerryking

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