recentpopularlog in

jerryking : memoirs   22

Susan Rice Recounts Making Policy at the Highest Levels
Oct. 10, 2019 | The New York Times | By Abby D. Phillip.

TOUGH LOVE
My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For
By Susan Rice
Illustrated. 531 pp. Simon & Schuster. $30.

Tough Love is Susan Rice's memoir. Susan Rice doesn't allow herself to be defined by the events of September 2012 in Benghazi, Libya, after which she was demonized by the right-wingers in the U.S. ....Rice’s personal story is rooted partly in slavery in America and partly in economic migration to the United States.....Rice benefitted from privilege that gave her access to well-heeled private schooling, elite advanced degrees (i.e. Stanford University, and later was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford) and membership in the even more elite Washington society. Rice’s unflagging work ethic and drive stems from her family's belief that, "The only constraints we faced were our own ambition, effort and skill.” ......Early in her career at the National Security Council, Rice navigated some of the most difficult foreign policy challenges the country has faced in recent history, and in a pattern that continued into the Obama years her fate seemed constantly intertwined with Africa. The 1994 genocide in Rwanda provided an object lesson in the moral failures of inaction. Later, she dealt with another major crisis that would reverberate later in her career. The 1998 Nairobi embassy and Dar es Salaam embassy bombings.
Rice is clinical in her retelling of the foreign policy decisions of the Clinton and Obama administrations. And there is no attempt to neatly sew together an overarching narrative about her approach to foreign policy challenges based on her years of experience in government. In fact, that may be the lesson of her tale of “tough love.” Public policy, Rice argues, is pragmatic, and sometimes a little dark: “We did fail, we will fail. Our aim must be to minimize the frequency and the price of failure.”.....Rice's “assertiveness and relentlessness” has cost her reputation within the State Department as a difficult boss. Rice has considered--and ruled out--pursuit of elected office, preferring the comfort of policy-focused, behind-the-scenes roles.
African-Americans  APNSA  assertiveness  Benghazi  books  book_reviews  cost_of_inaction  failure  memoirs  NSC  Obama  policymaking  public_policy  relentlessness  Rhodes  Stanford  Susan_Rice  tough_love  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S._State_Department  women  work_ethic 
october 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | My Father Wanted to Prove America Wrong About Race - The New York Times
By Susan E. Rice
Ms. Rice, a contributing opinion writer, is the author of the forthcoming memoir, “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For,” from which this essay is adapted.
African-Americans  books  Emmett_Rice  memoirs  Susan_Rice  tough_love 
october 2019 by jerryking
Michael Ovitz, Hollywood super-agent, on ‘winning at all costs’
SEPTEMBER 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

In Ovtiz's 20 years at CAA, it assembled hit after hit, including Jurassic Park, Tootsie, Goodfellas and Dances with Wolves. He talks about the agency as though describing a military campaign (he is a keen student of Sun Tzu’s The Art of War). “When I was at CAA, I had a singular mission, which was to win at all costs,” he says. “We were ultra-competitive and we were in a service business but my thesis was that we weren’t selling a product. We were selling and putting together people’s dreams . . . if we showed a weak link then we would be vulnerable. Vulnerability was a sin.”....Ovitz explains that the memoir evolved from an earlier idea about a book on deals. He played a leading role in the arrival of Japanese companies in Hollywood three decades ago, advising Sony on its 1989 purchase of Columbia Pictures and the sale a year later of Lew Wasserman’s MCA (later renamed Universal, and now part of Sky’s new owner Comcast) to Matsushita. Advising Japanese buyers was a strategic move, he explains. “If the studios are in trouble and going to go out of business, we lose leverage and our clients lose jobs. But if we can bring people in to buy the studios, not only do clients continue to get jobs but we’re the people talking to the owners.”...Ron Meyer and Ovitz
slowly built an empire, starting in television and moving into films, with the aim of representing every significant writer, director and star in town: “no conflict, no interest” was his mantra. It was a radically different model to what had come before. “Agents traditionally fielded orders, so if I was your agent and someone had a job, they’d call me and ask for you,” he says. “Or they’d tell me they had an assignment and, if you happened to be available, I’d pitch you.” Agencies were like “clearing-houses”.....that was archaic. You’re a writer, you’re loaded with ideas . . . why don’t we take those ideas and add elements to them and then sell the whole thing and let you control it? Why would we just wait to answer the phone?”.....Agents took on a more central role in Hollywood after CAA’s rise to power, assembling the composite parts of a film or television project before taking the “package” of script, star and director to the studios....."[Endeavour's] thesis is very similar to the thesis we had [at CAA], which is to expand into new areas that can service clients.”
actors  books  CAA  creating_valuable_content  dealmakers  deal-making  Hollywood  memoirs  Michael_Ovitz  professional_service_firms  Sun_Tzu  talent_management  talent_representation  vindictiveness  Lew_Wasserman 
october 2018 by jerryking
William Coleman Fought Civil-Rights Battles From the Inside - WSJ
William T. Coleman Jr. graduated at the top of his Harvard Law School class, served in President Gerald Ford’s cabinet as transportation secretary, argued 19 cases before the Supreme Court and was a director of companies including International Business Machines Corp. and PepsiCo Inc. He was one of the few blacks of his generation to become a top-level insider in business and government.

In his later years, he also was frustrated that American schools and neighborhoods remained largely segregated. “We underestimated the complexity of achieving sustained integration,” he wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Counsel for the Situation.”

He shunned extreme language. “You accomplish things by being in the room when the deal is made, and it’s just not in your interest to take positions where you’re not going to get in the room,” he said in an oral history.....He relished legal problem-solving, and it allowed him to live well. Blue-chip companies “pay me a hell of a lot of money to tell them what to do and what not to do,” he said in an interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. He also remained active in civil rights.
African-Americans  lawyers  Harvard  '70s  NAACP  memoirs  books  obituaries  civil_rights  segregation  desegregation  problem_solving  cabinets  HLS  blue-chips 
april 2017 by jerryking
John C. Whitehead - WSJ
Feb. 8, 2015| WSJ |

In 2005, Whitehead published a memoir A Life In Leadership: From D-Day to Ground Zero
obituaries  tributes  Wall_Street  books  The_Greatest_Generation  public_service  Goldman_Sachs  philanthropy  investment_banking  memoirs 
february 2015 by jerryking
David Carr: All the views he's fit to print - The Globe and Mail
JAMES BRADSHAW - MEDIA REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 12 2014
The darker chapters of his life are plainly detailed in his 2008 memoir, The Night of the Gun. In its 385 pages, he reports on his descent into an all-consuming cocaine addiction that derailed his journalism career, left him struggling to care for twin daughters born prematurely to a previous partner amid one of many binges, and ultimately sent him to six months of in-patient rehabilitation.....It is mid-August when we meet, and he has recently added an endowed professorship at Boston University to his day job at the Times, and will begin teaching his course – on making and distributing content, dubbed “Press Play” – in just a few weeks....students will be evaluated “as much by what you put in the margins of others’ work as you are for your own.”...Mr. Carr has leaped feet-first into journalism’s evolving digital playground. His chatty Twitter feed ranges from news to life at home and has amassed, at last count, nearly 462,000 followers. He reads long-form stories on Gawker and BuzzFeed.
David_Carr  digital_media  profile  NYT  books  courtesies  addictions  print_journalism  memoirs 
december 2014 by jerryking
Blackwater's Founder Blames U.S. for Its Troubles - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ |By Dion Nissenbaum.

Now, Mr. Prince says, he is done working for t he U.S. government. He has invested millions in setting up Frontier Resource Group, a private-equity firm that operates in more than a dozen African countries. The firm is building an oil refinery in South Sudan, owns a cement factory in the Democratic Republic of Congo, conducts aerial gas and oil surveys across the continent, and is looking at taking over idle oil wells damaged by insurgents in Nigeria, he said.
security_&_intelligence  entrepreneur  private_equity  memoirs  oil_refiners  CIA  Blackwater  books  drones  covert_operations  Africa  political_risk  frontier_markets  natural_resources  Leon_Panetta 
november 2013 by jerryking
Canadian embassies eavesdrop, leak says - The Globe and Mail
COLIN FREEZE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29 2013

In 1995, former CSEC employee Mike Frost wrote in his memoir, Spyworld, that he set up “listening posts” at Canadian embassies. His book says CSEC signals intelligence technicians during the Cold War were funded and mentored by NSA counterparts who taught them how to conceal a piece of spy machinery inside what appeared to be an office safe.
CSE  sigint  security_&_intelligence  NSA  Five_Eyes  diplomacy  espionage  eavesdropping  books  memoirs 
october 2013 by jerryking
Rumsfeld: Know the Unknowns - WSJ.com
APRIL 4, 2011| WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ. Before 9/11,
Rumsfeld distributed to colleagues a comment about Pearl Harbor by
economist Thomas Schelling: "There is a tendency in our planning to
confuse the unfamiliar with the improbable." Rumsfeld focuses on
unknown unknowns in order to encourage more "intellectual humility" ."It
is difficult to accept—to know—that there may be important unknowns."
"In the run-up to the war in Iraq, we heard a great deal about what our
intel community knew or thought they knew," he writes, "but not enough
about what they knew they didn't know." Policy makers can't afford to
be paralyzed by a lack of info., inaction by the world's superpower has
its own risks. Instead, Rumsfeld says the known known of info. gaps
should force a more robust give-and-take between policy makers &
intelligence analysts, allowing analysts to understand what policymakers
need to know & policymakers to understand what info. they can and
cannot get from intelligence.
Donald_Rumsfeld  superpowers  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  memoirs  decision_making  security_&_intelligence  information_gaps  humility  uncertainty  cost_of_inaction  unknowns  Thomas_Schelling  improbables  quotes  unfamiliarity  SecDef  policymakers  policymaking  intelligence_analysts 
april 2011 by jerryking
Jay-Z’s ‘Decoded,’ a Guide to his Life and Lyrics - NYTimes.com
Nov. 22, 2010 | NYT| By MICHIKO KAKUTANI. Part autobiography,
part lavishly illustrated commentary on his own work, “Decoded” offers a
harrowing portrait of the rough worlds Jay-Z navigated in his youth,
while simultaneously deconstructing his lyrics. “Decoded” is less a
conventional memoir or artistic manifesto than an elliptical,
puzzle-like collage: amid the reminiscences, there are music history
lessons that place rap in a social & political context; enthusiastic
shout-outs to the Notorious B.I.G. & Lauryn Hill; remedial lessons
in street slang; & personal asides about the exhaustingly
competitive nature of rap & the similarities between rap &
boxing, and boxing & hustling drugs. At the same time, “Decoded”
highlights the richly layered, metaphoric nature of the author’s own
rhymes —underscoring how Jay-Z’s former life honed his gifts as a
writer, including a survivor’s appraising sense of character, an
observer’s eye for detail & a hustler’s penchant for wordplay &
control.
Jay-Z  hip_hop  celebrities  music  autobiographies  memoirs  books  moguls  music_industry 
november 2010 by jerryking
Book Review: Business Memoirs - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 30, 2010 By JAMES FREEMAN who reviews the memoirs of Felix Rohatyn and James Wolfensohn.
book_reviews  investment_banking  memoirs  public_service  Felix_Rohatyn  James_Wolfensohn 
november 2010 by jerryking
Dear Book Lover: How to Get Kids to Read - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 1, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CYNTHIA CROSSEN.
I know libraries are under the budget gun today, but I wish they worked
a little harder at sales. "Too many libraries run like 'Helpy-Selfy
Supermarkets,'" wrote Margaret A. Edwards in her tart manual/memoir
about libraries and young adults, "The Fair Garden and the Swarm of
Beasts." "Many other institutions that serve the public and believe in
their product put skilled salespeople on the floor, not behind desks
waiting for the customer to approach them."
reading  howto  youth  libraries  books  cultural_institutions  sales  selling  memoirs 
october 2010 by jerryking
An Ally Remembers : Book review: A Journey - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 3, 2010 | | By MARTIN RUBIN. Defining 'New Labour,' defending the Iraq war, getting to know George W. Bush.
memoirs  Tony_Blair  book_reviews  books  politicians 
september 2010 by jerryking
Book Excerpt: Still Surprised -
August 24, 2010 BusinessWeek Book Excerpt: Still Surprised
In an edited excerpt from his new memoir, Warren Bennis writes with
poignancy and honesty about what he calls "The Crucible of Age"

by Warren Bennis
Warren_Bennis  memoirs  books  book_reviews  aging  leadership 
august 2010 by jerryking
Book review: Still Surprised - How an Expert Took the Lead
AUGUST 17, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ADRIAN
WOOLDRIDGE. As a guide to leadership, nothing Warren Bennis has learned
at Harvard or MIT topped the lectures he heard at Fort Benning, Ga.

What makes a great leader? What do you do when you first take over? How
do you avoid disaster?
book_reviews  leaders  leadership  memoirs  gurus  Warren_Bennis  books  veterans  surprises  first90days 
august 2010 by jerryking
Innocent Abroad
Apr 27, 2004 | Wall Street Journal pg. D.10 | Hugo Restall.
Reviews LOSING THE NEW CHINA
By Ethan Gutmann (Encounter Books, 253 pages, $25.95). like expats
everywhere, especially those who don't speak the language and thus are
isolated from the local residents, he became jaded the longer he stayed
-- and came to confuse cynicism with sophistication. That's the only way
to explain why Mr. Gutmann's memoir of 3 years in Beijing, "Losing the
New China," is such a polemic. Unremittingly he pushes a negative view
of China and its future. As for the American businessmen who are helping
to make China's economy grow, they are portrayed as either dupes or
traitors -- agents of corruption, undemocratic values and hedonism.
ProQuest  China  book_reviews  disillusioned  expatriates  books  memoirs 
march 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read