recentpopularlog in

jerryking : mental_health   18

Opinion | The Wisdom Your Body Knows - The New York Times
By David Brooks
Opinion Columnist

Nov. 28, 2019

**
** “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett.
This has been a golden age for brain research.....we mistakenly believe that thinking happens only from the neck up.......scientists are now focusing on the thinking that happens not in your brain but in your gut. You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. Much of this conversation is about how we are relating to others. Human thinking is not primarily about individual calculation, but about social engagement and cooperation.....When you enter a new situation, Porges argues, your body reacts. Your heart rate may go up. Your blood pressure may change. Signals go up to the brain, which records the “autonomic state” you are in....

a main purpose of the brain is to read the body, and to regulate "the body budget". Spotting a bully on the playground may cause one's brain to predict actions, speeds heart rates and breathing to deal with it. We experience these changes as emotion — e.g. fear, anger, etc. — because our brain has created an emotion concept [JCK - a lexicon??] to make those physical changes meaningful.

“You might think that in everyday life, the things you see and hear influence what you feel, but it’s mostly the other way around: What you feel alters your sight and hearing,”....... Under the old brain-only paradigm, we told people to self-regulate their emotions through conscious self-talk. But real emotional help comes through co-regulation. When a mother and a child physically hold each other, their bodily autonomic states harmonize, connecting on a metabolic level. Together they move from separate distress to mutual calm........the Welch Emotional Connection Screen, which measures the emotional connection between mothers and pre-term babies. ....When we step back and see the brain and body thinking together, the old distinction between reason and emotion doesn’t seem to make sense. Our perception of the world is shaped by the predictions our brains make about our physical autonomic states. It is vital to teach emotional granularity, something our culture pays almost no attention to. We’re not separate brains, coolly observing each other. We’re physical viscera, deeply interacting with each other. The important communication is happening at a much deeper level.
biology  Communicating_&_Connecting  David_Books  digestive_systems  emotional_connections  emotions  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  logic_&_reasoning  mental_health  metabolism  op-ed  physical_touch  physiological_response  psychology  stress_response  thinking  wisdom 
december 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | How Artificial Intelligence Can Save Your Life
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Brooks.
Opinion Columnist

In his book “Deep Medicine,” which is about how A.I. is changing medicine across all fields, Eric Topol describes a study in which a learning algorithm was given medical records to predict who was likely to attempt suicide. It accurately predicted attempts nearly 80 percent of the time. By incorporating data of real-world interactions such as laughter and anger, an algorithm in a similar study was able to reach 93 percent accuracy.....
algorithms  artificial_intelligence  books  clinical_depression  David_Brooks  diagnostic  doctors  medical  mens'_health  mental_health  op-ed  pattern_recognition  predictive_analytics  tools  visual_cues 
june 2019 by jerryking
Gut feelings: How microbes may affect your mental health
MAY 24, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL TAYLOR.

......A growing body of research suggests that what’s happening in the gut may also have an impact on the brain.....In a study published in February, for instance, Belgian scientists reported that two types of gut bacteria tend to be depleted in people with depression. The significance of this study is still open to debate. Although the scientists found “an association” between the absence of certain gut microbes and depression, they didn’t actually prove one thing causes the other......adds support to earlier studies that demonstrated mood and behaviour could be altered by manipulating the gut’s microbial contents..[JCK: from David Brooks, "You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. ].....It was once thought that depression resulted from a “chemical imbalance” in the brain. Based on this theory, patients should feel better by simply taking medications that restore the brain’s correct chemical balance.

But now researchers believe that there may be many different causes of depression, which is characterized by both structural and activity changes in the brain. Some evidence also suggests inflammation may play a role. “There are probably multiple types of depression that all masquerade as a single entity,” Sinyor explains. “And that’s the reason why we have many treatments that work, but certain treatments work for some people while other treatments work for others.”

Both Collins and Sinyor think it’s possible that research may eventually lead to new bacterial-based treatments for depression and other mental-health disorders.
bacteria  clinical_depression  digestive_systems  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  mens'_health  mental_health  microbes  microbiome 
may 2019 by jerryking
Former finance minister, ambassador and businessman Michael Wilson dies at 81 - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE AND ERIC ANDREW-GEE
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 10, 2019

Michael Wilson, a former federal finance minister and stalwart of Canadian business who overcame personal tragedy in later life to become an advocate for mental-health support, has died at 81.

Under prime minister Brian Mulroney, Mr. Wilson helped negotiate the North American free-trade agreement and brought in the federal goods and services tax, initiatives that were controversial at the time, but have survived to become pillars of federal policy......Mr. Wilson went on to have a laurelled career after politics as Canadian ambassador to the United States in the late 2000s and then chancellor of the University of Toronto from 2012 until 2018....He was also a veteran investment banker with a career in finance that spanned more than half a century and included senior roles at UBS Canada, Royal Bank of Canada and, most recently, Barclays Capital Canada.

But, of late, he was perhaps best known for his dedication to raising awareness of mental-health issues after his son Cameron died by suicide in 1995, at the age of 29​. That work included serving as chair of the Mental Health Commission of Canada for the past four years......Anthony Fell was Mr. Wilson’s boss as CEO of RBC Dominion Securities when Mr. Wilson was a partner in the investment bank, before entering federal politics. The two stayed close friends.

“It’s been said that one of the best thing you can leave behind is a sterling reputation for integrity and for making a positive difference in peoples’ lives, and this Michael Wilson has done throughout his life, in very full measure,” Mr. Fell said on Sunday.
Canada  Canadian  crossborder  Bay_Street  FTA  GST  investment_banking  leaders  mental_health  Michael_Wilson  NAFTA  obituaries  politicians  Progressive_Conservatives  RBC  UBS  UCC  uToronto  public_service  Tim_Kiladze 
february 2019 by jerryking
Confronting anxiety in the age of fear
Jo Ellison 16 HOURS AGO.

Fear is terribly boring. I suppose in modern jargon it could be called anxiety. But I prefer the old fashioned neurotic. I conjure fear from any source — electric kettles, exploding champagne corks, unattended bags . . . At night I consider unmentionable catastrophes and my preparedness to survive them. (Top tip: talking to a disaster relief engineer as to what to do in the event of Armageddon, she said to fill the bath tub. Safe potable water will be the key to one’s survival.)......Olivia Remes, an American PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, is the glamorous face of anxiety research.....While Remes acknowledges that some degree of anxiety can make us more productive, because it equips us to meet deadlines and complete tasks, she says excessive worry will always be debilitating because it paralyses our progress. We stop going out. We limit our lives.

The first step to recovery, she says, is to “do it badly”. Doing whatever it is that frightens you, she argues, will “catapult” you to action and help you realise that your fear may not be as bad as you think. Whatever else, it will only get better with practice. Anxiety, she adds, is largely the byproduct of perfectionism, whereby people stop doing things because they hold their own personal standards too high....loosen the grip. Because only by letting go of the things over which you have no control can you gain control over the things that really matter — namely, your mental health.
anxiety  fear  sense_of_control  earthquakes  randomness  perfectionism  survival_techniques  letting_go  mental_health  what_really_matters 
april 2018 by jerryking
Those who focus on police reform are asking the wrong questions - The Globe and Mail
AMANDA ALEXANDER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 29, 2016

The deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile underscore two truths about the United States: We make it difficult for people to get by and harder yet to care for each other. After decades of slashing welfare budgets and increasing investments in prisons, federal and state governments have charted a path for the country’s poorest: aggressive policing and incarceration. We’ve locked people out of the formal job market and criminalized their survival.

It is not coincidental that officers in New York and Baton Rouge killed Eric Garner and Alton Sterling, respectively, in the course of policing informal economies (selling loose cigarettes and CDs). We simply make life hard for people – until we extinguish it entirely....Each day, we require black people to risk their lives to be cafeteria workers, teachers, therapists. The United States demands impossible sacrifices from black people to sustain its economy, and has since slavery.

What does this have to do with police reform?

Very little. Reformers are asking the wrong questions. They have turned to increased police training and altered use-of-force protocols to end this nightmare. Fortunately, some among us demand another way. Young black activists are not just asking, “How do we make cops stop shooting us?” but instead, “What do our communities need to thrive? How do we get free?” They’re not begging for scraps; they’re demanding the world they deserve. If there’s a future for any of us, it’s in asking these questions, demanding fundamental shifts in resources and organizing like hell.....Meanwhile, cash-strapped cities continue to raise revenue from policing and fining the poor. And because of insufficient social service investment, Americans rely on police to be first responders to crises of mental health, addiction and homelessness.
policing  African-Americans  reform  informal_economy  mental_health  addictions  existential  foundational  homelessness  community_organizing  incarceration  institutional_path_dependency  structural_change  questions  Black_Lives_Matter  cash-strapped  cities  reframing  political_organizing 
july 2016 by jerryking
Confusing Medical Ailments With Mental Illness - WSJ.com
AUGUST 9, 2011

Confusing Medical Ailments With Mental Illness

By MELINDA BECK
Melinda_Beck  mental_health  mens'_health 
august 2011 by jerryking
July 21: Letters to the editor - The Globe and Mail
Dealing with dementia

Re Health Care: Ontario Aims To Expand Care for ‘Difficult’ Dementia
Patients (July 19): “Experts believe that in many cases difficult
behaviour could be avoided or more easily controlled if it is properly
understood.” So when my dementia-ridden mother suddenly swung her cane
like a baseball bat at my face, it could have been prevented if I’d been
trained to “understand” her behaviour? Aggression, irrationality, anger
& frustration combine with a loss of inhibitions & judgment to
make maniacs out of what were once nice, rational people. Understanding
behaviour may help caregivers to forgive, but it won’t help Mom.

Her nursing home needs extra staff (but has none) to care for my mother
because she physically resists all help but can do nothing for herself.
Send 4 of those 700 new health-care workers to bathe Mom, brush her
teeth, wash her hair & trim her nails & that will make a
difference. But tell them to watch out. She bites.

Brenda McMillan, Toronto.
letters_to_the_editor  dementia  mental_health 
july 2011 by jerryking
Seven health risks that could lead to Alzheimer’s - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD,
PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTER— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 19, 2011

The seven risk factors, in descending order of magnitude, were identified as:

* Low education: "Use it or lose it" is an important credo in Alzheimer's prevention. Schooling is key because stimulating the brain builds neural networks and the more education a person has the more likely they are to engage in stimulating brain activity.

* Smoking: Among other things, smoking weakens blood vessels and it affects blood flow to the brain. But almost one-third of adults in the world still smoke. The research estimates 13.9 per cent of Alzheimer's cases are linked to smoking.

* Physical inactivity: Studies show that people who are physically active have better cognitive abilities and are less likely to develop dementia. Worldwide about one in six people are inactive. The new study found that 12.7 per cent of Alzheimer's cases were likely due to inactivity.

* Depression: People who suffer from depression have more than double the risk of developing dementia. About one in seven people in the world will suffer from serious depression. Researchers calculated that about 10.6 per cent of Alzheimer's cases could be traced to depression.

* High blood pressure: About one in nine people in the world have hypertension in middle age. The study estimated that poorly-controlled blood pressure accounts for 5.1 per cent of Alzheimer's cases.

* Diabetes: Research shows patients with type 2 diabetes have a significantly higher risk of developing Alzheimer's. Globally, almost seven per cent of adults have diabetes. The research team found it could be responsible for about 2.4 per cent of Alzheimer's cases.

*Obesity: Women and men who are obese at middle age have an increased risk of dementia later in life. Worldwide about 3.5 per cent of the population is both obese and middle-aged. The study found that obesity is associated with about two per cent of Alzheimer's cases.
Alzheimer’s_disease  André_Picard  dementia  mens'_health  mental_health  health_risks  risks 
july 2011 by jerryking
Why Canada needs a national strategy on dementia
September 18, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by André Picard.
"Canada's health and welfare systems are woefully unprepared for a
coming crisis. The Alzheimer Society is pleading for a national action
plan, as it has repeatedly in its 32 years of existence. Yet the federal
government refuses to invest in a strategy for dementia to match those
already in place for cancer, heart disease and mental health. The Health
Minister is refusing even to meet a new independent group of leading
researchers in the field.

So, today and next week, The Globe and Mail's journalists do what the
government would not: They consult experts, from renowned scientists to
the members of dementia victims' families, gathering facts and recording
personal experiences with the devastating disease. They also present a
seven-point plan to grapple with the coming crisis. It is only a
starting point, but if we don't begin the quest for desperately needed
solutions, more and more of us will slip away."
André_Picard  cognitive_skills  mental_health  crisis  dementia  Alzheimer’s_disease  unprepared  action_plans  national_strategies 
september 2010 by jerryking
Well - Physical Toll of Dementia Often Overlooked in Treatment - NYTimes.com
October 19, 2009 | New York Times | By TARA PARKER-POPE . The
lack of understanding about the physical toll of dementia means that
many patients near the end of life are subjected to aggressive
treatments that would never be considered with another terminal illness.
health  Alzheimer’s_disease  dementia  nursing_homes  palliative_care  living_wills  elderly  TARA_PARKER-POPE  mental_health 
october 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read