recentpopularlog in

jerryking : mental_maps   6

Reading with intention can change your life
May 03, 2016 | Quartz | WRITTEN BY Jory Mackay.

Warren Buffett, who says he spends 80% of his time reading and writing, attributes a huge amount of his success to a single book: The Intelligent Investor, by his mentor Benjamin Graham. For Malcolm Gladwell, it was Richard Nisbett’s The Person and the Situation that inspired his string of New York Times bestselling books. These are what economist Tyler Cowen calls “quake books”—pieces of writing that are so powerful they shake up your entire worldview......As author and avid reader Ryan Holiday explains: “Whatever problem you’re struggling with is probably addressed in some book somewhere written by someone a lot smarter than you.” [JCK: Don't Reinvent the Wheel]

Every story has been experienced, recorded, and published by someone at some point in time. Beyond just stories, books provide life lessons—a set of proven theories and anecdotes that you can apply to your own life.“.........

Often we're ok with the why of reading, but what about the how? Too often we get through a book, flip the last page, sit back, and think, “What the hell did I just read?” Reading and being able to use what you’ve read are completely different things......Without purpose and intention, the ideas sparked while reading easily slip away. .......Having a clear question in mind or a topic you’re focusing on can make all the difference in helping you to remember and recall information. While this can be as easy as defining a subject to look into beforehand, if time is no object here’s how to effectively “hack” your brain into being impressed with the subject matter:

Before reading
Ruin the ending. Read reviews and summaries of the work. You’re trying to learn why something happened, so the what is secondary. Frame your reading with knowledge around the subject and perspective of what’s being said and how it relates to the larger topic.

During reading
As you read, have a specific purpose in mind and stick to it. Don’t let your mind be the river that sweeps your thoughts away as you read. Be a ruthless notetaker. Your librarian might kill you for this, but using a technique such as marginalia (writing notes in the margin and marking up key patterns for follow ups), will make you a more active reader and help lock information in your memory.

After reading
Engage with the material. Write a summary or analysis of the main ideas you want to recall or use, research supporting topics and ideas noting how they connect with what you’ve read, and then present, discuss, or write about your final ideas.

Make associations with what you already know
Repeat, revisit, and re-engage
5_W’s  cross-pollination  deep_learning  hacks  high-impact  howto  intentionality  life-changing  memorization  mental_maps  note_taking  problem_definition  problem_framing  productivity  purpose  questions  reading  reinventing_the_wheel  Ryan_Holiday  tips 
may 2018 by jerryking
How Artists Change the World - The New York Times
AUG. 2, 2016 | NYT | David Brooks.

Frederick Douglass was not an artist but understood how to use a new art form. Douglass used his portraits to change the way viewers saw black people.....And that’s what Douglass did with his portraits. He took contemporary stereotypes of African-Americans — that they are inferior, unlettered, comic and dependent — and turned them upside down.....“Picturing Frederick Douglass,” curated by John Stauffer, Zoe Trodd and Celeste-Marie Bernier, and you can read a version of Gates’s essay in the new special issue of Aperture magazine, guest edited by Sarah Lewis.....Douglass was combating a set of generalized stereotypes by showing the specific humanity of one black man. ...Most of all, he was using art to reteach people how to see.

We are often under the illusion that seeing is a very simple thing. You see something, which is taking information in, and then you evaluate, which is the hard part.

But in fact perception and evaluation are the same thing. We carry around unconscious mental maps, built by nature and experience, that organize how we scan the world and how we instantly interpret and order what we see.

With these portraits, Douglass was redrawing people’s unconscious mental maps. ....“Poets, prophets and reformers are all picture makers — and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements,” Douglass wrote. This is where artists make their mark, by implanting pictures in the underwater processing that is upstream from conscious cognition. Those pictures assign weights and values to what the eyes take in.
David_Brooks  artists  photography  Frederick_Douglass  books  poets  prophets  mental_maps  interpretation  subconscious  portraits  humanity 
august 2016 by jerryking
Busy and Busier
Oct 24 2012 | The Atlantic | James Fallows.

a lot of people are feeling overwhelmed is because people are not in true survival or crisis mode as often as they have been in much of our history. The interesting thing about crisis is that it actually produces a type of serenity. Why? Because in a crisis, people have to integrate all kinds of information that’s potentially relevant, they have to make decisions quickly, they have to then trust their intuitive judgment calls in the moment. They have to act. They’re constantly course-correcting based on data that’s coming up, and they’re very focused on some outcome, usually live—you know, survive. Don’t burn up. Don’t die.

But as soon as you’re not in a crisis, all the rest of the world floods into your psyche. Now you’re worried about taxes and tires and “I’m getting a cold” and “My printer just crapped out.” Now that flood is coming across in electronic form, and it is 24/7.....The thing about nature is, it’s information rich, but the meaningful things in nature are relatively few—berries, bears and snakes, thunderstorms, maybe poison oak. There are only a few things in nature that force me to change behavior or make a decision. The problem with e-mail is that it’s not just information; it’s the need for potential action. It’s the berries and snakes and bears, but they’re embedded, and you don’t know what’s in each one....Things on your mind need to be externalized—captured in some system that you trust. You capture things that are potentially meaningful; you clarify what those things mean to you; and you need maps of all that, so you can see it from a larger perspective. With better technology, I’d like a set of maps—maps of my maps. Then I could say, “Okay, which map do I want to work on right now? Do I want to work on my family map, because I’ve got family members coming over for dinner?” Then you can drill down into “Oh, my niece is coming. She likes this food, her favorite color is pink, her dog is named …” Then you can back off and say, “That’s enough of that map. What’s the next map I want to see?” Or: “I’d just like to read some poetry right now.”  [JCK: this is really an example of thinking in layers]
busy_work  course_correction  crisis  David_Allen  GTD  human_psyche  information_overload  James_Fallows  living_in_the_moment  mapping  mental_maps  metacognition  metadata  metaphysical  monotasking  productivity  nature  noise  overwhelmed  self-organization  sense-making  signals  stress_response  thinking  thinking_deliberatively 
november 2013 by jerryking
What Knowledge Is of Most Worth in the Global and Digital Economy?
Catching Up or Leading the Way

by Yong Zhao

We must cultivate skills and knowledge that are not available at a
cheaper price in other countries or that cannot be rendered useless by
machines. This is mainly Pink's argument but is shared by others such as
the New Commission on Skills of the American Workforce and Harvard
economists Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz, both professors of
economics at Harvard University. In The Race Between Education and
Technology, they write:

Today, skills, no matter how complex, that can be exported through
outsourcing or offshoring are vulnerable. Even some highly skilled jobs
that can be outsourced, such as reading radiographs, may be in danger of
having stable or declining demand. Skills for which a computer program
can substitute are also in danger. But skills for non-routine
employments and jobs with in-person skills are less susceptible. (Goldin
& Katz, 2008, p. 352)
21st._century  automation  China  core_competencies  Daniel_Pink  digital_economy  eBay  education  face2face  future-proofing  highly_skilled  imagination  in-person  knowledge  Lawrence_Katz  Managing_Your_Career  mental_maps  non-routine  personal_growth  outsourcing  self-analysis  self-worth  skills  skills_training  special_sauce 
june 2011 by jerryking
Does the Internet Make You Dumber? - WSJ.com
JUNE 5, 2010 | WSJ | NICHOLAS CARR. The cognitive effects are
measurable: We're turning into shallow thinkers, says Nicholas Carr.
Nicholas_Carr  information_overload  cognitive_skills  internet  mental_maps  shallowness  skimming 
june 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read