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Returning to your primal state | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
The BIG five compound movements are squats, deadlifts, bench presses, barbell rows and overhead barbell presses.

* Why are compound movements important?
Compound movements are any exercise that engages two or more different joints, therefore impacting multiple muscles during the same exercise. They improve overall fitness by benefitting the key categories: cardiovascular health, strength and flexibility.

* More burn
Compound movements burn more calories than an isolation exercise. As you build more muscle, your basal metabolic rate (the rate at which you burn calories when at rest) goes up. While doing compound movements, your body expends about five calories of energy to consume one litre of oxygen. That means that an exercise involving more muscle tissue, such as compound movements, requires more oxygen and that helps burn more calories.

* Benefits of each compound movement
SQUAT
Squats activate the muscles all over the upper and lower body. They are a relatively easy movement to learn, but there are varieties and progressions that offer challenges on the way to mastering them.Physical benefits:
Enhance the mobility in the hips and ankles
Challenge your core stabilizers, posterior chain and lower leg
Correct muscle imbalances
Life benefits:
Ease movements such as bending down to lift boxes, working in the garden, trying on shoes at the mall or picking up after a dog during a walk
DEADLIFT
Deadlifts target lats, glutes, hamstrings and core stabilizers, but also work your entire body. They are a great exercise for stabilizing the posterior chain, which is the group of muscles through your whole back.Physical benefits:
Improve overall speed, power and athleticism
Help create a nice shape, especially the butt and legs
Life benefits:
Help when you're doing movements such as picking up heavy boxes or lifting kids
BENCH PRESS
Bench presses are the most effective exercise to gain upper-body strength and mass.Physical benefits:
Increase overall upper-body strength
Improve cardiovascular function
Life benefits:
Anything that requires pushing, whether that's pushing a stroller or a lawnmower or attempting power-sled exercises in the gym
BARBELL ROW
This is one of the key exercises that carries over to the other big lifts. If you do it well, you'll improve all the other compound movements.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the back
Reinforces proper hip function
Life benefits:
Improves posture
Helps undo some of the damage of sitting every day
OVERHEAD BARBELL PRESS
While the overhead barbell press strengthens the upper body, particularly shoulder muscles, it also gives your stabilizers a workout as you maintain proper form.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the rotator cuff, which helps people who are internally rotated
Reduces the risk of shoulder injuries
Life benefits:
Eases the impact of constantly looking down at cellphones
Improves posture
You can start off with bodyweight, rather than weights..... air squat can still deliver a workout. You can also just use the bar without weights. .....Perfecting the movements helps ward off injury when you do load on some weight. Once you’re comfortable with the movements, put together a periodized plan (ask a GoodLife professional about a 5x5 program to get you started). You’ll soon see and feel the benefits of more strength, increased energy, better posture and higher fat burn.
chest  deadlifts  Goodlife  metabolic_rate  strength_training  squats  fitness  glutes  military_press  compound_movements  functional_strength  core_stability 
august 2019 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  metabolic_rate  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Older You Are, the Worse You Sleep
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Dr. Matthew Walker, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of a new book, “Why We Sleep” (Scribner)

As we age, bodily changes degrade the quantity and quality of our sleep—which affects our health more than we realize....Sleep gets more difficult the older you get. Older adults are less able, on average, to obtain as much sleep, or as restorative a sleep, as young adults. The problem gets so bad that by our 80s, the lack of sleep can have major health ramifications, though we don’t always notice.

Older adults face a number of challenges. The first is a reduction in the quantity and quality of deep sleep—the stage that beneficially overhauls your cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems and refreshes learning and memory abilities. As you enter your 30s and 40s, your deep-sleep brain waves become smaller, less powerful and fewer in number. Reductions in deep-sleep quality increase your risk of heart attacks, obesity and stroke, as well as the buildup of a toxic brain protein—called beta amyloid—that is linked​to Alzheimer’s disease.

Passing into your mid- to late-40s, age will have stripped you of 60% to 70% of the deep sleep you were enjoying as a teen. By the time you reach age 70, you will have lost 80% to 90% of your youthful, restorative deep sleep....The second hallmark of altered sleep as we age is fragmentation. The older we get, the more frequently we wake up throughout the night. Causes include body pain and a weakened bladder. Reducing fluid intake in the evening can help the latter, but it isn’t a cure-all.

Because of sleep fragmentation, older people will suffer a reduction in sleep efficiency, defined as the percent of time you were asleep while in bed.The third sleep change with advanced age is that of circadian timing—the body’s internal clock that times our sleep-wake rhythms. Seniors commonly experience a regression in circadian timing, leading to earlier bedtimes. The cause is an early release and peak of melatonin in older adults in the evening, instructing an earlier start time for sleep, in part because of an early drop in core body temperature.
aging  Alzheimer’s_disease  books  cardiovascular  circadian_rhythms  health_risks  heart_attacks  immune_system  melatonin  mens'_health  metabolic_rate  sleep 
october 2017 by jerryking
Review: How Laws of Physics Govern Growth in Business and in Cities
MAY 26, 2017 | The New York Times | By JONATHAN A. KNEE

Book review of “Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies” (Penguin), by Geoffrey West, a theoretical physicist.....Mr. West’s core argument is that the basic mathematical laws of physics governing growth in the physical world apply equally to biological, political and corporate organisms.....The central observation of “Scale” is that a wide variety of complex systems respond similarly to increases in size. Mr. West demonstrates that these similarities reflect the structural nature of the networks that undergird these systems. The book identifies three core common characteristics of the hierarchal networks that deliver energy to these organisms — whether the diverse circulatory systems that power all forms of animal life or the water and electrical networks that power cities. First, the networks are “space filling” — that is, they service the entire organism. Second, the terminal units are largely identical, whether they are the capillaries in our bodies or the faucets and electrical outlets in our homes. Third, a kind of natural selection process operates within these networks so that they are optimized......These shared network qualities explain why when an organism doubles in size, an astonishing range of characteristics, from food consumption to general metabolic rate, grow something less than twice as fast — they scale “sublinearly.” What’s more, “Scale” shows why the precise mathematical factor by which these efficiencies manifest themselves almost always relate to “the magic No. 4.”

Mr. West also provides an elegant explanation of why living organisms have a natural limit to growth and life span following a predictable curve, as an increasing proportion of energy consumed is required for maintenance and less is available to fuel further expansion.

....Despite his reliance on the analysis of huge troves of data to develop and support his theories, in the concluding chapters, Mr. West makes a compelling argument against the “arrogance and narcissism” reflected in the growing fetishization of “big data” in itself. “Data for data’s sake,” he argues, “or the mindless gathering of big data, without any conceptual framework for organizing and understanding it, may actually be bad or even dangerous.”
books  book_reviews  business  cities  economics  efficiencies  economies_of_scale  growth  innovation  Jonathan_Knee  linearity  massive_data_sets  metabolic_rate  natural_selection  physical_world  physics  physicists  powerlaw  scaling  selection_processes  sublinearity  sustainability 
may 2017 by jerryking
Preoccupations - The Urban Lands of Opportunity
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com |By RICHARD FLORIDA. Over the past
20 yrs., a new way of working and a new kind of workplace have evolved.
Increasingly, places (e.g. the Starbucks where we drink coffee &
send e-mail; the hotel lobby where we take a meeting; or the local
library where we write,edit & revise documents) are supplanting
plants — corporate HQ and factories — as the principal social and
economic organizing units of our time...Especially in tough times, it
makes more sense to choose a big city, with its thick labor markets and
greater economic opportunities, over a single company...The metabolic
rate of living organisms tends to slow as they increase in size. But
cities can achieve a faster rate of “urban metabolism” as they grow,
leading to more innovation, economic growth and improved living
standards. When cross-pollinated in the urban jungle, people come up
with more and better ideas and produce more results from those ideas by
finding more collaborators as well as critics.
Rotman  Richard_Florida  urban  cities  workplaces  work_life_balance  cross-pollination  information_spillover  metabolic_rate  metabolism  third_spaces  hard_times  coffeehouses 
june 2010 by jerryking

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