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jerryking : metabolism   13

Make 2020 the Year of Less Sugar
Dec. 30, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tara Parker-Pope.

Added sugar lurks in nearly 70 percent of packaged foods and is found in breads, health foods, snacks, yogurts, most breakfast foods and sauces. The average American eats about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day (not counting the sugars that occur naturally in foods like fruit or dairy products). That’s about double the recommended limit for men (nine teaspoons) and triple the limit for women (six teaspoons).........the benefit of reducing the sugar in your diet. “It’s not about being obese, it has to do with metabolic health,” .......“Sugar turns on the aging programs in your body,” ...... “The more sugar you eat, the faster you age.”.....the case against sugar is as strong as the case against smoking or excess alcohol. ......eating high amounts of added sugar doubles the risk of heart disease, even for people who aren’t overweight. Added sugar has also been implicated in an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes, cancer, stroke and even Alzheimer’s disease.

And too much added sugar in your diet can damage your liver, similarly to the way that alcohol can. About a third of American adults and 13 percent of children have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition linked to added sugar consumption that is on the rise and that can progress to serious, even deadly, liver illness..... when the liver repeatedly detects more fructose, a form of sugar found in fruits that is also added to many processed foods, than our bodies can use. To deal with it, the liver breaks down the extra fructose and changes it to fat globules, which are then exported into the bloodstream and deposited around your internal organs and your midsection.

Fruit vs. Fructose
it’s O.K. to eat fruit! Your body can handle fructose when it’s eaten as whole fruit!!!.....for many people, getting control of their sugar habit is the most important thing they can do for their health. If they can’t do it through abstinence, then mostly-abstinence is a good thing to achieve.”
abstinence  diets  healthy_lifestyles  mens'_health  metabolism  nutrition  obesity  resolutions  sugar  Tara_Parker-Pope 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | The Wisdom Your Body Knows - The New York Times
By David Brooks
Opinion Columnist

Nov. 28, 2019

**
** “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett.
This has been a golden age for brain research.....we mistakenly believe that thinking happens only from the neck up.......scientists are now focusing on the thinking that happens not in your brain but in your gut. You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. Much of this conversation is about how we are relating to others. Human thinking is not primarily about individual calculation, but about social engagement and cooperation.....When you enter a new situation, Porges argues, your body reacts. Your heart rate may go up. Your blood pressure may change. Signals go up to the brain, which records the “autonomic state” you are in....

a main purpose of the brain is to read the body, and to regulate "the body budget". Spotting a bully on the playground may cause one's brain to predict actions, speeds heart rates and breathing to deal with it. We experience these changes as emotion — e.g. fear, anger, etc. — because our brain has created an emotion concept [JCK - a lexicon??] to make those physical changes meaningful.

“You might think that in everyday life, the things you see and hear influence what you feel, but it’s mostly the other way around: What you feel alters your sight and hearing,”....... Under the old brain-only paradigm, we told people to self-regulate their emotions through conscious self-talk. But real emotional help comes through co-regulation. When a mother and a child physically hold each other, their bodily autonomic states harmonize, connecting on a metabolic level. Together they move from separate distress to mutual calm........the Welch Emotional Connection Screen, which measures the emotional connection between mothers and pre-term babies. ....When we step back and see the brain and body thinking together, the old distinction between reason and emotion doesn’t seem to make sense. Our perception of the world is shaped by the predictions our brains make about our physical autonomic states. It is vital to teach emotional granularity, something our culture pays almost no attention to. We’re not separate brains, coolly observing each other. We’re physical viscera, deeply interacting with each other. The important communication is happening at a much deeper level.
biology  Communicating_&_Connecting  David_Books  digestive_systems  emotional_connections  emotions  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  logic_&_reasoning  mental_health  metabolism  op-ed  physical_touch  physiological_response  psychology  stress_response  thinking  wisdom 
december 2019 by jerryking
The Zen of Weight Lifting
Nov. 22, 2019 | The New York Times | By Brad Stulberg.

There’s an old Eastern adage: “Before enlightenment, chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment, chop wood, carry water.” It’s great training advice too.......A favorite movements at the gym is called a farmer’s carry. You hold a heavy weight in each hand and attempt to walk with a solid, upright posture for between 30 and 60 seconds...... the farmer’s carries work your grip, core, arms, legs and even cardiovascular system — an utterly elegant full-body exercise. .......The physical and mental health benefits of weight lifting are well documented. Weight training can help us to maintain muscle mass and strength as we age, as well as better mobility and metabolic and cardiovascular health. It may help ease or prevent depression and anxiety, and promote mental sharpness.......lifting weights becomes a transformative practice to be undertaken primarily for its own sake, the byproduct of which is a nourishing effect on the soul.....Weight lifting offers participants a chance to pursue clear and measurable goals with outcomes that can be traced directly back to oneself.....In the weight room, however, it’s just you and the bar. You either make the lift or you don’t. If you make it, great. If not, you train more, and try again. Some days it goes well, other days it doesn’t. But over time, it becomes clear that what you get out of yourself is proportionate to the effort you put in. It’s as simple and as hard as that. A kind of straightforwardness and self-reliance that gives rise to an immense satisfaction, a satiating feeling that makes it easier to fall asleep at night because you know you did something real, something concrete, in the world. This doesn’t mean that progress happens fast or is always linear. Consistency and patience are key. If you try to rush the process or force heroic efforts, you invariably wind up getting hurt. Weight lifting, like so much in life, demands showing up day in and day out, taking small and incremental steps that, compounded over time, lead to big gains.
Whether you like it or not, there will be plateaus, which in my experience tend to occur right before a breakthrough. Weight lifting teaches you to embrace them, or at the very least accept them.....For most, the plateau is a form of purgatory. But to advance beyond the low-hanging fruit in any meaningful discipline — from weight lifting, to writing, to meditation, to marriage — you must get comfortable spending time there. Weight lifting shoves this reality in your face since progress, or in this case, lack thereof, is so objective.......
you don’t keep showing up and pounding the stone.

But here’s a paradox: Pound too hard or too often, and you’ll run into problems. The only way to make a muscle stronger is to stress it and then let it recover. In other words, you’ve got to balance stress and rest. Exercise scientists call this “progressive overload.” Too much stress, not enough rest, and the result is illness, injury or burnout. Too much rest, not enough stress, and the result is complacency or stagnation. It’s only when yin and yang are in harmony that you grow — another lesson that applies to a lot more than lifting weights.

It is true that from the outside, weight lifting can seem dull or boring — same movements, same barbells, same people at the same gym. 
Weight lifting fulfills three basic needs:
Autonomy: The ability to exert oneself independently and have control over one’s actions.
Mastery: A clear and ongoing path of progress that can be traced back to one’s efforts.
Belonging: Being part of a community, lineage or tradition that is working toward similar goals.
 
The Zen of weight lifting — the joy, fulfillment, hard-earned calluses and growth — lives in the process, in the journey. 
cardiovascular  compounded  consistency  core_stability  efforts  exercise  fitness  functional_strength  incrementalism  metabolism  movement-based  objective_reality  paradoxes  patience  plateauing  small_wins  soul-enriching  strength_training 
november 2019 by jerryking
8 Muscle Gaining Mistakes - Men Over 40 (FIXED!!) - YouTube
(1) Start with the Warm-up, get body ready to train. Get your heart rate up. Break a sweat.
(2) Focus on building strength. Do so responsibly. Controlled strength is the focus. Commend the weight that you use. Pause reps for bench press and squats. Progressively overloading.
(3) Train the mind-muscle connection. Pursuit of the quality of each repetition. Introduction of joint stability and muscular control.. Now feed more into controlled strength.
(4) How to string quality reps into quality sets and a quality workout? Introduce metabolic training. Lighter weights on exercises and going for the burn (metabolic stress). Get THROUGH the burn.
(5) Train like an athlete. Be scientific, be purposeful. Doing athletic things. E.g. Jumping. Don't be one dimensional.
(6) Boring corrective exercises. Face-pulls.
(7) What type of cardio? Do sparing cardio. Battle ropes, sled push, Farmers carry,
(8) Nutrition and supplementation. Our metabolism changes. Reliance on consistent, high quality nutrition. Be on point with your nutrition. Focus on increasing consistency of diet.
aging  AthleanX  cardiovascular  diets  metabolism  midlife  mistakes  nutrition  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
How exactly does fat cause cancer?
July 22, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL TAYLOR.

our understanding of fat has gone through a huge transformation in recent years.

It was once thought that fat – medically known as adipose tissue – was just an inert collection of cells used for the storage of surplus calories, or energy, that we can draw upon in times of need.

But now medical experts realize that fat behaves almost like an organ – interacting with other parts of the body. It actually sends out signals that play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, the immune system and other functions. If we become overweight or obese, the normal running of the body can get knocked off balance by too many signals from fat.

There are several ways in which fat may contribute to the development of a variety of cancers:

(1) fat can be converted to estrogen – a hormone that is known to fuel the growth of some ovarian, endometrial (the membrane lining the uterus) and breast cancers.

(2) Fat also creates a state of chronic inflammation – another factor linked to cancer. The inflammatory process is associated with free radicals, unstable oxygen molecules that can damage DNA and cause potentially cancerous genetic mutations.

(3) excess weight often leads to a condition known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose (or sugar) from the blood stream into cells where it is used for energy. As the body’s cells become resistant to insulin, the pancreas responds by producing more and more of the hormone in an attempt to clear glucose from the bloodstream. Elevated levels of insulin and related substances – such as insulin-like growth factor-1 – stimulate cells to divide and multiply. This increased activity may lead to random genetic mutations that set the stage for cancer.

(4) People with excessive weight around the abdomen are prone to gastric reflux (or heartburn), in which digestive juices will back up into the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach. The constant irritation can damage cells and may lead to esophageal cancer.

(5) Dietary and lifestyle factors that may contribute to weight gain are also directly linked to an increased cancer risk. For example, diets rich in red meats and highly processed foods have been implicated in colorectal and other cancers.

People who tend to eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains are consuming a host of micronutrients that may help guard against cancer. Likewise, studies suggest that regular exercise may be protective, too.
cancers  colorectal  cured_and_smoked  diets  digestive_systems  exercise  fats  healthy_lifestyles  immune_system  inflammation  insulin  meat  metabolism  risk_factors 
july 2019 by jerryking
How ‘The Pump’ can help give your muscles – and ego – a quick boost - The Globe and Mail
PAUL LANDINI
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 7 HOURS AGO

If, however, you’ve been putting in the hours and you’ve already built an appreciable amount of muscle that’s not hidden underneath a smooth layer of fat, keep reading, because you’re a prime candidate for taking advantage of the vainglorious lifter’s best friend – “the pump.”

Immortalized by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1977 documentary Pumping Iron, “the pump” is the temporary increase in a muscle’s size that follows ultraintense sets of high-repetition resistance exercises. As your muscles contract during a lift, metabolic compounds such as lactic acid accumulate in and around the muscle cells. Water and blood is then drawn into the muscle (“pumped,” if you will) as a defence mechanism against the inflammation brought on by these compounds. The longer and more taxing the set, the more fluid that enters the cells, the ultimate result being a muscle that looks like it’s been shrink-wrapped.

A side benefit of this practical biological function? For up to about an hour afterward your muscles will appear significantly larger, providing an instant ego boost before strutting one’s stuff on the beach-side boardwalk or disrobing for a photo shoot. But the pump isn’t all smoke and mirrors. This style of training forms the basis of all bodybuilding programs, where the end goal is the accumulation of maximum muscle........The pump-training protocol is the exact opposite of strength training. Whereas strength gains come from lifting relatively heavy weights for low reps with up to two minutes of rest between sets, building a pump is all about high volume and minimal rest. Anywhere from 12 to 20 reps will suffice, with 30 to 45 seconds of rest max. Adding some pauses at the end-point of the exercises will increase the intensity and test your mental fortitude, as will employing “finishers” such as drop sets, in which you extend the set for as long as you can by continually reducing the weight once you’ve hit failure so you can keep firing off a few more reps.

Resistance bands are the perfect tool for building a pump, as they offer constant tension throughout the entire range of motion during each exercise, never giving your muscles a chance to rest.
exercise  fitness  strength_training  power_of_the_pause  metabolism 
june 2019 by jerryking
Waking Up at 4 A.M. Every Day Is the Key to Success. Or to Getting a Cold.
June 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Adam Popescu.

Is the key to success emulating high-profile achievers who are hacking their bodies to increase productivity? Even if capitalism favors early wake-up times, at least as a badge of honor, there is no data that shows that successful people get less sleep...... this early-rising trend propagated by entertainers and entrepreneurs is deeply troubling. And while some people seem to need less sleep than others, we can’t game our body clocks.......In 1999, researchers at the University of Chicago monitored a group who slept only four hours a night — a common amount for those who wake up very early — for six days in a row. That group quickly developed higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, higher blood pressure and produced half the usual amount of antibodies to a flu vaccine........When we delay or speed up our internal body clock, it can have the same consequences as not getting enough sleep, a phenomenon known as advanced sleep-wake phase disorder.......Missing even two hours here, an hour there, then having a wildly different sleep pattern over the weekend, is the gateway drug to chronic sleep deprivation. Fatigue, irritability and overall mental confusion are the dangers and symptoms of such deprivation....In 2008, professors at the University of Chicago, including Eve Van Cauter, the director of the Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center, found a link between sleep loss and an increased risk for obesity and diabetes. A decade later, the university advanced those studies to find that chronic sleep loss can increase the amount of free fatty acids in the blood.

That means a metabolism disruption that reduces the body’s ability to use insulin to regulate blood sugar.
antibodies  blood_pressure  circadian_rhythms  diabetes  early_risers  high-achieving  immune_system  metabolism  overachievers  self-care  sleep 
june 2019 by jerryking
Sitting for More Than 13 Hours a Day May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise
April 10, 2019 |The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and many other chronic conditions. Even a single workout can improve our metabolisms, studies show, so that we burn fat more efficiently after meals and keep our blood sugar and insulin levels steady.

Inactivity, meanwhile, has almost the opposite physiological effects. People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.
inactivity  sedentariness  mens'_health  disease  exercise  fitness  metabolism 
april 2019 by jerryking
How to Minimize Pancreatic Cancer Risk - The New York Times
By Jane E. Brody
July 23, 2018

In most of the approximately 6 percent of five-year survivors, pancreatic cancer is discovered early quite by accident, usually during a scan or surgery for some other reason.....The pancreas is a small two-part glandular organ — about 7 inches long and 1.5 inches wide — lying in the upper abdomen behind the stomach. It performs two vital functions. One part of the gland is a source of digestive enzymes and the other part produces the hormones insulin and glucagon that control blood levels of glucose and fatty acids.

Some known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are beyond an individual’s control: older age, being an African-American or Ashkenazi Jew and having two or more first-degree relatives (parents or siblings) who have had the cancer.

But it is the modifiable risk factors that are currently of greatest concern. Aside from tobacco smoking, which accounts for 20 percent to 25 percent of pancreatic cancers even as this risk factor continues to decline, the main risks for pancreatic cancer cases and deaths are obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome..... [JCK - Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. These conditions include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

Having just one of these conditions doesn't mean you have metabolic syndrome. But it does mean you have a greater risk of serious disease. And if you develop more of these conditions, your risk of complications, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, rises even higher. ]..... all of which have risen to epidemic levels in recent years.....be alert to the possibility of hidden cancer in patients newly diagnosed with diabetes who are 50 or older, have no family history of the disease, are losing weight and their diabetes is not controlled by oral medication......Early diagnosis is vital because pancreatic cancer is highly resistant to most therapies and often recurs after surgery. Currently, only 20 percent of cancers are even eligible for surgery, she said. The pancreas is next to very large blood vessels and when the tumor involves them, it cannot safely be removed.

One bright spot for people with diabetes: The drug metformin, often used by patients to help control blood sugar, has in some studies been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer and improved survival chances for those who develop the cancer. This drug, which has also been linked to longevity and healthy aging, is an inexpensive generic with an excellent safety record.
cancers  risks  diabetes  howto  metabolism  pancreas  risk_factors 
july 2018 by jerryking
The Art of Focus
June 2, 2014 | - NYTimes.com | David Brooks.

The way to discover a terrifying longing is to liberate yourself from the self-censoring labels you began to tell yourself over the course of your mis-education. These formulas are stultifying, Phillips argues: “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself. Because the point of knowing oneself is to contain one’s anxieties about appetite.”[JCK: anti the valorization of self-awareness??]

Thus: Focus on the external objects of fascination, not on who you think you are. Find people with overlapping obsessions. Don’t structure your encounters with them the way people do today, through brainstorming sessions (those don’t work) or through conferences with projection screens.

Instead look at the way children learn in groups. They make discoveries alone, but bring their treasures to the group. Then the group crowds around and hashes it out. In conversation, conflict, confusion and uncertainty can be metabolized and digested through somebody else. If the group sets a specific problem for itself, and then sets a tight deadline to come up with answers, the free digression of conversation will provide occasions in which people are surprised by their own minds.
children  constraints  curiosity  David_Brooks  fascination  focus  howto  metabolism  mis-education  passions  self-awareness  self-censorship  self-discovery  sustained_inquiry  uncertainty  unknowns 
june 2014 by jerryking
Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything - Tony Schwartz - The Conversation
August 24, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | by Tony Schwartz.
Here are 6 keys to achieving excellence: 1. Pursue what you love.
Passion is an incredible motivator. 2. Do the hardest work first.
3. Practice intensely, without interruption for short periods of no
longer than 90 minutes and then take a break.
4. Seek expert feedback, in intermittent doses. The simpler and more
precise the feedback, the more equipped you are to make adjustments. Too
much feedback, too continuously, however, can create cognitive
overload, increase anxiety, and interfere with learning.
5. Take regular renewal breaks. Relaxing after intense effort not
only provides an opportunity to rejuvenate, but also to metabolize and
embed learning. It's also during rest that the right hemisphere becomes
more dominant, which can lead to creative breakthroughs. 6. Ritualize
practice
hbr  tips  self-improvement  JCK  intensity  focus  feedback  Tony_Schwartz  passions  metabolism  excellence  practice  rituals  intermittency  creative_renewal  breakthroughs  disconnecting 
september 2010 by jerryking
Preoccupations - The Urban Lands of Opportunity
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com |By RICHARD FLORIDA. Over the past
20 yrs., a new way of working and a new kind of workplace have evolved.
Increasingly, places (e.g. the Starbucks where we drink coffee &
send e-mail; the hotel lobby where we take a meeting; or the local
library where we write,edit & revise documents) are supplanting
plants — corporate HQ and factories — as the principal social and
economic organizing units of our time...Especially in tough times, it
makes more sense to choose a big city, with its thick labor markets and
greater economic opportunities, over a single company...The metabolic
rate of living organisms tends to slow as they increase in size. But
cities can achieve a faster rate of “urban metabolism” as they grow,
leading to more innovation, economic growth and improved living
standards. When cross-pollinated in the urban jungle, people come up
with more and better ideas and produce more results from those ideas by
finding more collaborators as well as critics.
Rotman  Richard_Florida  urban  cities  workplaces  work_life_balance  cross-pollination  information_spillover  metabolic_rate  metabolism  third_spaces  hard_times  coffeehouses 
june 2010 by jerryking

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