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jerryking : metaphors   12

Spencer Johnson, ‘Who Moved My Cheese?’ Author, Dies at 78 - The New York Times
“Who Moved My Cheese?,” which was published in 1998, was the story — in 94 pages of large type — of two mice, Sniff and Scurry, and two tiny people, Hem and Haw, looking for cheese in a maze. When the cheese supply runs out at Cheese Station C, the mice leave without angst to find more.

But Hem and Haw resist, refusing to accept change. Haw overcomes his anxiety and ventures out of his comfort zone — at first timidly, but then, gradually, with more confidence — in search of a new supply of cheese.

“Before long, he knew why he felt good,” Mr. Johnson wrote about Haw. “He stopped to write again on the wall: ‘When you stop being afraid, you feel good!’”
obituaries  '90s  metaphors  writers  authors  management_consulting 
july 2017 by jerryking
Why Millennials Swipe Right On ‘Swiping’ - WSJ
By BEN ZIMMER
Nov. 3, 2016

Tinder’s massive success, with users making more than a billion swipes a day, has led to an array of other apps adopting the swipe-to-like approach. “Swiping” has even permeated the language, with “swipe left” used as a general metaphor for rejection and “swipe right” for acceptance and openness.
gestures  millennials  Tinder  metaphors  online_dating 
november 2016 by jerryking
Keep Calm and Carry On
May 31, 2013 | NYT |By TONY SCHWARTZ

I had been away much of the week, I was tired and I had several morning meetings the next day that I did not want to miss. I made an instant decision: I am not going to let myself get frustrated or move into victim mode. It’s something I have worked at for many years. ....The first technique comes from sports psychology--the best tennis players are meticulous about renewing themselves in the 20 to 30 seconds between points. The first thing these players did when a point ended was to turn away from the net.

I loved the metaphor: Turn away from the net. Let it go. Don’t dissipate energy on something you can no longer influence. Invest it instead where it has the power to make a difference. I came to call it the Energy Serenity Prayer....the Each of us has a finite reservoir of energy in any given day. Whatever amount of energy we spend obsessing about missteps we have made, decisions that do not go our way or the belief we have been treated unfairly is energy no longer available to add value in the world.

Worse yet, negative emotions feed on themselves and move us into fight or flight – a reactive state in which it is impossible to think clearly. Negative emotions also burn down energy at a furious rate. It is exhausting to be a victim.

The goal is to keep calm and carry on.

If I was to keep my composure at this point, I needed to find a new gear.

This is where the second technique came in. I have long recognized that one of the best ways to make yourself feel better is to make someone else feel better
I also happened to be in the midst of reading a book called “Give and Take” by Adam Grant, which makes a compelling case that people who give without expecting anything in return actually turn out not only to feel better for having done so, but also to be more successful.

Giving, Mr. Grant explains, does not require extraordinary acts of sacrifice. It simply involves a focus on acting in the interests of others. When takers succeed, there is usually someone else who loses. When givers give, it spreads and cascades. In my own case, the book served as a powerful reminder that the “giver” is the person I want to be....Rather than feeling sorry for myself, I decided to focus on making other people feel better.
inspiration  books  giving  work_life_balance  serving_others  beyond_one's_control  personal_energy  span_of_control  sport_psychology  disconnecting  affirmations  metaphors  athletes_&_athletics  finite_resources  tennis  missteps  Adam_Grant  high-impact 
june 2013 by jerryking
Design Sets Tone at Square, a Mobile Payments Start-Up - NYTimes.com
By NICK BILTON
| January 15, 2012,

“We believe strongly that the company is going to be reflected in the product and vice-versa,” Mr. Dorsey said. “The internal matches the external and the external matches the internal, and if we can’t provide a clean, simple, well-designed experience in here, it’s not going to be reflected in our identity. It’s in our DNA.” (Mr. Dorsey also is the chairman and co-founder of Twitter, where his obsession with openness is not as extreme.)

Square also borrows metaphors from traditional institutions, including the old United States Mint building, which sits across the street from the company’s office. “It looks like something that is built to last; it looks like it will stay up forever,” he said. “So how do you build that into pixels instead of stone?”

For centuries banks were built with thick stone walls, marble slab floors and heavy metal doors, all of which gave customers the feeling that bankers were dependable and trustworthy.

Square transactions primarily occur on a small plastic plug, inserted into a smartphone’s headphone jack, through which people swipe credit cards.

A hefty chunk of marble it is not. Square’s front door to customers is a smartphone application. Square has to provide the simplest experience possible, Mr. Dorsey believes, because, along with good design, it will evoke trust and confidence in a new financial institution that lives in a smartphone.
Square  Jack_Dorsey  start_ups  mobile_payments  metaphors  design  smartphones  mobile_applications  UX  customer_experience  trustworthiness  confidence 
january 2012 by jerryking
Amy Chua Is a Wimp - NYTimes.com
Jan 17, 2011 | NYT| DAVID BROOKS. ... Practicing music for 4
hrs. requires focus, but it’s not as cognitively demanding as a
sleepover with 14-yr-old girls....Participating in a well-functioning
group is really hard. It requires the ability to trust people outside
your kinship circle, read intonations & moods (i.e. cues & prompts), understand how the
psychological pieces each person brings to the room can & can`t fit
together.This skill set is not taught formally, but it is imparted
through arduous experiences....Chua would do better to see the classroom
as a cognitive break from the truly arduous tests of childhood. Where
do they learn how to manage people? Where do they learn to construct and
manipulate metaphors? Where do they learn to perceive details of a
scene the way a hunter reads a landscape? Where do they learn how to
detect their own shortcomings? Where do they learn how to put themselves
in others’ minds & anticipate others’ reactions?
Amy_Chua  parenting  cues  prompts  nonverbal  David_Brooks  Tiger_Moms  arduous  empathy  emotional_intelligence  EQ  self-awareness  self-reflective  metaphors  people_skills  self-regulation  girls  hunting  tacit_knowledge 
january 2011 by jerryking
A New Vocabulary for Trade
Aug 4, 2005 | WSJ pg. A.12 | Jagdish Bhagwati. The flat world
metaphor is, , both inept and mistakenly alarming. The real problem in
the increasingly globalized economy is rather that most producers in
traded activities -- an expanding set because services have become
steadily more tradeable -- face intensified competition. A specific
producer here will find rival suppliers stealing up on him from
somewhere, whether Portugal, Brazil or Malaysia, indeed from sources
which may not include India and China....Historically, comparative
advantage was "thick," shielded by big buffers. This is no longer so:
not predictably from India and China, but almost certainly from
somewhere. Hence I use the metaphor: "kaleidoscopic comparative
advantage." Today, you have it; but in our state of knife-edge
equilibrium, you may lose it tomorrow and regain it the day after.
...[How quickly can Ontario's colleges pull together a new course? How
much of the content is general vs. specific? for Dianne-- pinboard search on "institutional_integrity" "legal system" ]
ProQuest  flat_world  globalization  Tom_Friedman  metaphors  India  China  comparative_advantage  impermanence  transient  kaleidoscopic  instability  accelerated_lifecycles  global_economy 
december 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - Yes, People Still Read, but Now It’s Social - NYTimes.com
June 18, 2010 | New York Times | By STEVEN JOHNSON, Nicholas
Carr's new book, “The Shallows,” argues that the compulsive skimming,
linking and multitasking of our screen reading is undermining the deep,
immersive focus that has defined book culture for centuries.
Distractions come with a heavy cost--studies show how multitasking harms
our concentration. But we must also measure what we gain from
multitasking....The problem with Mr. Carr’s model is its unquestioned
reverence for the slow contemplation of deep reading. For society to
advance as it has since Gutenberg, he argues, we need the quiet,
solitary space of the book. Yet many great ideas that have advanced
culture over the past centuries have emerged from a more connective
space, in the collision of different worldviews and sensibilities,
different metaphors and fields of expertise. (Gutenberg himself borrowed
his printing press from the screw presses of Rhineland vintners, as Mr.
Carr notes.)
cognitive_skills  collective_intelligence  collective_wisdom  Communicating_&_Connecting  connected_learning  contemplation  cross-disciplinary  deep_learning  discernment  distractions  focus  Johan_Gutenberg  Kindle  metaphors  multitasking  monotasking  Nicholas_Carr  reading  solitude  Steven_Johnson  sustained_inquiry  thinking  thinking_deliberatively  worldviews 
june 2010 by jerryking
Illness as Economic Metaphor - WSJ.com
JUNE 20, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By MICHAEL MILKEN and JONATHAN SIMONS. The first rule, as always, is do no harm.

"[There's] a remarkable alignment between treatment regimens for sick economies and sick people. In both cases, it's important at some point to let the patient's immune system carry the load of recovery. Overtreatment is bad medicine.

Before the 1970s, our economy's "immune system" resided in financial institutions, especially banks and insurance companies. Companies looked to these institutions for capital that could restore growth and create jobs whenever the economy got sick. Beginning with the 1974-75 recession, however, capital markets took over the healing function; equity and bond markets provided the "antibodies" that corporate America could depend on to fight off the infection of recession.

Economies that lack the crucial immune-system component of a corporate bond market tend to suffer longer, deeper recessions. The most obvious case in point is Japan, whose banks struggled to recapitalize in the 1990s.
'70s  antibodies  capital_markets  deleveraging  economic_downturn  financial_institutions  immune_system  metaphors  Michael_Milken  overtreatment  recessions  stress-tests  
june 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: My friend is newly jobless - and clueless
February 19, 2009 at 7:21 PM EST G& M column by DAVID EDDIE
offering advice to the newly jobless and clueless. Start looking for
work right away and not wait (I'd told him I would start looking as soon
as my current job was over): "Because people can tell when you're in
your bathrobe, both literally and metaphorically."
job_search  layoffs  attitudes  metaphors 
february 2009 by jerryking

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