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jerryking : metaphysical   6

The Toronto Poetry Map: See (and read) a new way of exploring the city - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 13 2015

The Toronto Poetry Map captures the city in words. Click on an area and you’ll be presented with an excerpt, or several, from works referencing the street, or landmark, or neighbourhood....“The metaphysical Toronto is what we actually see in this map,” says Clarke. “The Toronto that’s conjured up by our imaginations as we ponder the reality of our existence here.”
poems  poetry  poets  Toronto  mapping  metaphysical  neighbourhoods  streetscapes  storytelling  imagination  landmarks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Busy and Busier
Oct 24 2012 | The Atlantic | James Fallows.

a lot of people are feeling overwhelmed is because people are not in true survival or crisis mode as often as they have been in much of our history. The interesting thing about crisis is that it actually produces a type of serenity. Why? Because in a crisis, people have to integrate all kinds of information that’s potentially relevant, they have to make decisions quickly, they have to then trust their intuitive judgment calls in the moment. They have to act. They’re constantly course-correcting based on data that’s coming up, and they’re very focused on some outcome, usually live—you know, survive. Don’t burn up. Don’t die.

But as soon as you’re not in a crisis, all the rest of the world floods into your psyche. Now you’re worried about taxes and tires and “I’m getting a cold” and “My printer just crapped out.” Now that flood is coming across in electronic form, and it is 24/7.....The thing about nature is, it’s information rich, but the meaningful things in nature are relatively few—berries, bears and snakes, thunderstorms, maybe poison oak. There are only a few things in nature that force me to change behavior or make a decision. The problem with e-mail is that it’s not just information; it’s the need for potential action. It’s the berries and snakes and bears, but they’re embedded, and you don’t know what’s in each one....Things on your mind need to be externalized—captured in some system that you trust. You capture things that are potentially meaningful; you clarify what those things mean to you; and you need maps of all that, so you can see it from a larger perspective. With better technology, I’d like a set of maps—maps of my maps. Then I could say, “Okay, which map do I want to work on right now? Do I want to work on my family map, because I’ve got family members coming over for dinner?” Then you can drill down into “Oh, my niece is coming. She likes this food, her favorite color is pink, her dog is named …” Then you can back off and say, “That’s enough of that map. What’s the next map I want to see?” Or: “I’d just like to read some poetry right now.”  [JCK: this is really an example of thinking in layers]
busy_work  course_correction  crisis  David_Allen  GTD  human_psyche  information_overload  James_Fallows  living_in_the_moment  mapping  mental_maps  metacognition  metadata  metaphysical  monotasking  productivity  nature  noise  overwhelmed  self-organization  sense-making  signals  stress_response  thinking  thinking_deliberatively 
november 2013 by jerryking
One final ignominy for a pioneer of abstract art
Sep. 26 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | RUSSELL SMITH

We Canadians shouldn’t be shocked – we ourselves have little concept of placing historical markers of cultural grandeur in our cities. We don’t name our streets after our artists, even when a great artist lived there. We don’t even put up plaques on their former houses. Our municipal governments have no interest in turning our dull concrete grids into a series of references to fantasy – as the streets of Paris and London, for example, are; there, you can walk and meet ghosts of both authors and fictional characters; not only can you see who died of consumption in a garret upstairs, but also whose character did. These plaques lay a fictional city over a real one. (Oh well, you might say, Canada is not famous for its art anyway. And I would say, yes, and this is why.)
Russell_Smith  art  Russia  ideacity  culture  history  overlay_networks  fantasy  wayfinding  artists  cities  virtual_worlds  cityscapes  iconic  street_furniture  landmarks  metaphysical  London  Paris  imagination 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Triumph of the Humanities - NYTimes.com
June 13, 2011,By STANLEY FISH.

There is now a (relatively) new discipline in which this breaking down
of time into spatial units that are read vertically rather than
horizontally is the obligatory gesture. It calls itself GeoHumanities
and its project is nicely encapsulated in the title of one of the essays
in a collection that officially announces the emergence of a field of
study. The collection is called “GeoHumanities: Art, History, Text at
the Edge of Place”; the essay (by Edward L. Ayers, an historian and
president of the University of Richmond) is entitled “Mapping Time.”

Ayers’s project is to map the changes that followed upon the
emancipation of the slaves after the Civil War. He and his colleagues
begin with a simple map and then they locate populations on the
landscape and “put down one layer after another: of race, of wealth, of
literacy, of water courses, of roads, of railways, of soil type, of
voting patterns, of social structure.”
Stanley_Fish  humanities  digital_humanities  geography  geohumanities  New_York  reservoirs  mapping  books  Civil_War  Emancipation  African-Americans  demographic_changes  metaphysical  metadata  overlay_networks 
june 2011 by jerryking
Men like dogs: Technology is allowing us to act more like our canine friends
May 6, 2011 | The Economist |by Schumpeter.

David Crow presentation from a few years ago on smart glasses--augmented reality.

Dogs, they say,
think in maps informed with their smell. They sniff &re-sniff a
location to find out what has been there & they sniff the air to
tell the future: to discover what will be here or where they'll go next.
Thus, dogs have a different sense of 'now'. Unlike our eyes, which take
in what is visible & apparent at this moment, their noses can sense
the past — who & what was here & what’s decaying underneath —
& the future of a place — what’s coming, just upwind. Dogs are
microprocessors & their noses feed their data bases. It strikes me
that the web— particularly the mobile web— is building a dog’s map of
the world. Via Foursquare, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Maps, Layar,
Goggles, etc.,we can look at a place & see who & what was here
before, what happened here, what people think of this place.Every place
will tell a story it could not before, without a nose to find the data
about it and a data base to store it and a mind to process it.
dogs  technology  Foursquare  Twitter  location  overlay_networks  location_based_services  smell  mapping  augmented_reality  metaphysical  sense-making  storytelling  wayfinding 
may 2011 by jerryking

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