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jerryking : middle_management   5

What if you’re not chosen for a ‘hi-po’ programme?
AUGUST 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Uviebinené.

Organisations naturally need to have a leadership pipeline through which they identify, develop and promote high potential (hi-po) employees who can lead the company in the future. However, given that most will not be selected, it is inevitable that some talented individuals will feel overlooked.

Organisations devote significant resources to these “chosen few”. They give a few individuals privileged access to training, exposure to decision makers and mentorship, all of which helps propel them towards the coveted top spot..... such programmes are invitation only. But how to get invited on to them is usually a closely guarded secret. Sometimes it is a formal process, but at other times it is at the discretion of senior management....So what happens when you are not chosen for a “fast track” programme? It is easy to start questioning your capabilities and even aspirations. It can be a motivation killer at first, leaving you feeling undervalued.....Harvard Business Review data suggests companies are bad at correctly identifying high-potential employees....The best organisations build a culture that nurtures high-potential individuals whether or not there is a formal talent development programme in place. This is especially true for women and minorities in the workplace who remain under-represented at every level in the corporate talent pipeline....New research from Northwestern University in the US suggests that early career hurdles actually help spur future success. The study showed that experiencing setbacks at the start of a career has a powerful and opposing effect: “Individuals with near misses systematically outperformed those with near wins in the long run.”

Early success does not always predict future success. Longer term, what you do when faced with disappointment usually determines whether or not you have what it takes to have a successful career....If you just missed out on a talent development programme, do not be disheartened. It leaves open the possibility of proving yourself on your own terms, rather than getting boxed into one company’s view of what leadership looks like.
career_paths  fast_track  HBR  high-achieving  invitation-only  leadership  leadership_development  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  middle_management  movingonup  selection_processes  strivers  talent  talent_management  talent_pipelines  talent_spotting  talent_scouting  training  up-and-comers 
august 2019 by jerryking
The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye -
JULY 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Two Stanford biz profs, Melissa Valentine and Michael Bernstein, have introduced the idea of “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.....information technology has made the flash organization a suddenly viable form across a number of industries.....intermediaries are already springing up across industries like software and pharmaceuticals to assemble such organizations. They rely heavily on data and algorithms to determine which workers are best suited to one another, and also on decidedly lower-tech innovations, like middle management......Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, e.g. Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.....Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations. “We’re the producers,” Ms. Miller said. “We understand how to evaluate talent, pick the team.”.....
Three lessons stand out across the flash-type models. First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power....Second is the importance of well-established roles. ...Third, there is perhaps the least likely of innovations: middle management. The typical freelancer performs worker-bee tasks. Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers...........Flash organizations have obvious limits....they tend to work best for projects with well-defined life spans, not continuing engagements....“The bottleneck now is project managers,” ... “It’s a really tough position to fill.”.....even while fostering flexibility, the model could easily compound insecurity. Temporary firms are not likely to provide health or retirement benefits. ..... the anxiety is legitimate, but these platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.
pop-ups  freelancing  on-demand  ephemerality  producers  execution  Hollywood  project_management  teams  data  algo  lessons_learned  Business_Talent_Group  Gigster  Artella  Foundry  Slack  pharmaceutical_industry  Outsourcing  contractors  job_insecurity  middle_management  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  short-lived 
july 2017 by jerryking
Note From the Edge: Sometimes You Can't Control Your Success - WSJ.com
September 2, 1997 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

An Ex-Manager Says You Can't Always Control Your Success

Mr. Curnutt says. He speaks for a large populace of middle managers who aren't golden boys being groomed for senior management, who will likely rise only so far and then stay there.

But there is more these managers can do to bust out of their confining boxes. Mr. Curnutt always wanted to be a manager and he says now he would have been better off majoring in business or accounting from the start. I think he also could have been more aggressive in promoting himself, particularly after getting his M.B.A. Perhaps he could have created a new position, using some of the skills he learned in his M.B.A. program, instead of waiting for the company to identify an opportunity for him.

Even then, of course, things might not work out. Not everyone is meant to ride the gravy train. But you have everything to gain and nothing to lose. Remember, those who stand in place the longest are the most vulnerable. Ask Mr. Curnutt.
action-oriented  beyond_one's_control  contingency_planning  crisis  crisis_management  first_movers  Hal_Lancaster  immobilize  middle_management  paralyze  self-promotion  stress_response  Sue_Shellenbarger  uncertainty 
december 2012 by jerryking
Making the Change From Middle Manager To a Seat at the Top - WSJ.com
July 7, 1998 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER

Less surprising, delivering results matters. Thinking strategically, being persuasive, being politically adroit and having a "significantly broader organizational awareness" also tend to make up a successful manager, ...Earn respect for being exceptionally good at what you do and show that you can run a business independently. Translation: Deliver results without a lot of hand-holding....a seldom-mentioned trait: consistency. "They must show consistency in the decisions they make and in their behavior," ..."A lot of people fail to make the next move because they really don't understand" how to assess risk," she says. "Or they don't have a Plan B."
Hal_Lancaster  ksfs  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  executive_management  risk-assessment  risk-management  contingency_planning  JCK  transitions  companywide  middle_management  consistency  decision_making  Plan_B  off-plan  hand-holding  strategic_thinking  personal_accomplishments 
december 2012 by jerryking

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