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jerryking : midlife   52

As I enter middle age, these are the fitness lessons I wish I could teach my younger self
October 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL LANDINI.

Mistakes have been made. Efforts were wasted. Time was lost. If I could mentor my 20-year-old self, the first thing I would do is collect all of the tattered fitness and lifestyle magazines that would soon lead me astray and throw them all in the trash where they belong. Then, I would sit myself down and impart the following hard-earned knowledge.

* IT’S SUPPOSED TO BE FUN
Remember recess? Remember how much fun it was to be set loose upon the schoolyard after enduring hours of enforced sitting? ...Playground games such as double dutch, red rover and tag always appealed to me more than traditional sports, but as we age, society tells us to stop playing games, to get serious, to respect and follow the rules. The grown-up rules of physical fitness emphasize pain, suffering and drudgery over pleasure, joy and leisure. Exercise becomes a form of corporal punishment for simply existing; you can’t indulge in any of life’s rewards without having to pay the price on the treadmill the next day........The point here is that there is great happiness to be had in being active, you just have to find the right outlet. Powerlifting, CrossFit, kettlebell sport, parkour, gymnastics, cycling, swimming, dancing, walking, running, rowing, climbing – each of these activities has merit, each can deliver “results.” If your current workout is leaving you bored and listless, try something new. A whole world of movement possibilities awaits.

* START WITH STABILITY
Just like solving an algebra problem or landing a 747, the principles of getting in shape are governed by a specific order of operations. However, unlike the laws of mathematics and aerodynamics, the consequences for ignoring the rules of fitness aren’t as dire. The worst thing that will happen, outside of actually injuring yourself, is a complete lack of progress in reaching any of your goals.

There are variations on these steps, catchy turns of phrase that certain coaches will use to enhance their industry brand, but the gist is the same – first you enhance stability, then you build strength, then you apply that strength to some form of fast, explosive movement. The logic of this continuum is evident – you can’t be fast without being strong, and you can’t be strong without first building a stable foundation. [JCK Stability, Strength, Power] Of course, all of this was beyond me when I first started lifting, which is why I didn’t progress for a long time.

The fitness industry sells itself by using exciting images of muscular people doing cool things – Kettlebell swings! Box jumps! Deadlifts! – the implicit message being: This could be you......know planks and push-ups are boring, but you must master your body first. Then, and only then, are you ready to increase resistance.

* YOU DON’T NEED BARBELLS
This is a corollary to the last two points, if not a summary of my fitness philosophy in general. Barbells are designed to support significant weight – hundreds upon hundreds of pounds – and in that respect, they do their job very well. Now, what about you. What are you wired to do?

If your answer is “move as much weight as humanly possible,” then stick with barbell training. It will serve you well for a time, as long as your technique and programming are sound, but eventually your body will break.......For everyone else, it’s time to think outside of the squat rack. If you’re walking into your workouts with anything less than a semi-reluctant enthusiasm, freeing yourself from the confines of barbells and benches can have a dramatic impact on your mindset. Think push-ups over bench press, pull-ups over pull-downs, sled pushes over squats. Actually, everyone should squat, you just don’t need to sling a barbell on your back to do so.
aging  CrossFit  exercise  fitness  lessons_learned  midlife  play  pull-ups  push-ups  squats  stability  strength_training 
october 2019 by jerryking
8 Muscle Gaining Mistakes - Men Over 40 (FIXED!!) - YouTube
(1) Start with the Warm-up, get body ready to train. Get your heart rate up. Break a sweat.
(2) Focus on building strength. Do so responsibly. Controlled strength is the focus. Commend the weight that you use. Pause reps for bench press and squats. Progressively overloading.
(3) Train the mind-muscle connection. Pursuit of the quality of each repetition. Introduction of joint stability and muscular control.. Now feed more into controlled strength.
(4) How to string quality reps into quality sets and a quality workout? Introduce metabolic training. Lighter weights on exercises and going for the burn (metabolic stress). Get THROUGH the burn.
(5) Train like an athlete. Be scientific, be purposeful. Doing athletic things. E.g. Jumping. Don't be one dimensional.
(6) Boring corrective exercises. Face-pulls.
(7) What type of cardio? Do sparing cardio. Battle ropes, sled push, Farmers carry,
(8) Nutrition and supplementation. Our metabolism changes. Reliance on consistent, high quality nutrition. Be on point with your nutrition. Focus on increasing consistency of diet.
aging  AthleanX  cardiovascular  diets  metabolism  midlife  mistakes  nutrition  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Luke Perry Had a Stroke and Died. I Had One and Lived.
March 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Contributing Opinion Writer.

Kara Swisher was 49 years old, healthy and had none of the conditions--symptoms--like high blood pressure that might predict a stroke...yet she had one after arriving in Hong Kong after a long flight...not hydrating or walking around enough on the long flight to Hong Kong, created what the doctor, who immediately started the treatment of anticoagulant drugs and others, called a “hole in one.”.....The idea of death — the absolute nearness of it — has been ever-present for Kara Swisher. Since her dad died, she's lived her life as if she had no time at all or very little, making the kinds of choices of someone who knew that tomorrow might indeed be her last.

[Stanford University in 2005 by the Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs:

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.]

.....Sometimes {Steve Jobs'] urgency manifested itself in inspiration, sometimes in meanness, sometimes in humor, sometimes in seriousness. But it was always urgent.......[recast in my words...I have both the privilege to live more days on earth and the awareness that those days are limited.

Be tough-minded going forward--Basically, I don’t have the time to be so careless in what I do and I don’t have the time to not to ask the same of you.].........You get this kind of nudge again and again from death. It is, as the Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski noted, “a secret teacher hiding in plain sight.” Luke Perry’s death was yet another lesson from that teacher. ....... Mr. Perry’s Dylan McKay, who was given to saying things like, “The only person you can trust in this world is yourself.”
'90s  actors  hydration  Kara_Swisher  Luke_Perry  midlife  mini-stroke  mybestlife  op-ed  tips  speeches  Stanford  Steve_Jobs  strokes  symptoms  television  travel  It's_up_to_me  urgency  long-haul  deaths 
march 2019 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Myths Aside, Time Is on the Side of Aging Entrepreneurs - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Irving Wladawsky-Berger
Aug 31, 2018

Are young entrepreneurs more likely to produce high-growth firms? Can middle-age founders in their 40s be successful?

Age and High-Growth Entrepreneurship, — a recent working paper by economists Pierre Azoulay, Benjamin Jones, J. Daniel Kim and Javier Miranda — aimed to answer these questions.
aging  ageism  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  high-growth  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  midlife  myths  Silicon_Valley  founders 
september 2018 by jerryking
The midlife crisis — and how to deal with it | Financial Times
Emma Jacobs JULY 13, 2018

The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After Midlife, by Jonathan Rauch, Bloomsbury Publishing, RRP£18.99, 256 pages

There Are No Grown-Ups: A Midlife Coming-of-Age Story, by Pamela Druckerman, Doubleday, RRP£14.99, 288 pages

No One Tells You This: A Memoir, by Glynnis MacNicol, Simon & Schuster, RRP$26, 304 pages
books  book_reviews  mortality  aging  midlife  parenting 
july 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Survive Your 40s - The New York Times
By Pamela Druckerman

Ms. Druckerman is a writer in her 40s, living in Paris.

May 4, 2018
aging  grace  howto  midlife  women 
may 2018 by jerryking
Why can’t we all be as productive as Picasso?
MARCH 28, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

The year 1932 was a landmark moment for Picasso both personally and professionally. Having recently turned 50, the artist found himself feverishly experimenting with new styles and subjects as he reflected on his own contemporaneity and relevance. It was the year his marriage to Olga broke down, and the year in which a group of Paris dealers would mount his first ever retrospective.

Picasso’s “year of wonders” is obviously a cause for celebration — even if only for his astonishing output.
......As the New Yorker writer and critic Malcolm Gladwell so deftly pointed out in his 2008 book, Outliers, those who are blessed with the talent of a genius only become so after 10,000 hours of practice: the “magic number of greatness”. Debate has raged ever since as to the precise number at which the merely good become gifted, but Gladwell’s theory has always held a beguiling allure. If only I weren’t so appallingly lazy, I too might write a bestselling novel, or win a gold medal for figure skating, or fulfil my life-long dream of becoming a lead soprano in a West End musical. It’s always served as a peculiar comfort to know that the only obstacle to my success has been feckless indolence — and possibly the invention of the iPhone.

Which is why the Picasso exhibition was so grim. It wasn’t so much that he worked extremely hard to become the world’s most famous artist. Anyone could, technically, slave away in a studio for hours crafting their genius. It’s that he still found time to finesse such a gloriously well-rounded and fulsome life in the spaces he found in between.
Pablo_Picasso  Malcolm_Gladwell  artists  reflections  aging  genius  prolificacy  productivity  midlife  well-rounded  interstitial  personal_accomplishments  10000_hours 
april 2018 by jerryking
Lift Weights, Eat More Protein, Especially if You’re Over 40 - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS FEB. 7, 2018

To answer the simplest question of whether taking in more protein during weight training led to larger increases in muscle size and strength, the researchers added all of the results together....And the answer was a resounding yes. Men and women who ate more protein while weight training did develop larger, stronger muscles than those who did not.
strength_training  fitness  exercise  aging  midlife  diets  proteins 
february 2018 by jerryking
How to Improve Resilience in Midlife
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By TARA PARKER-POPE.

“There is a naturally learnable set of behaviors that contribute to resilience,” said Dr. Grant, who, with Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook, wrote the book “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy.” “Those are the behaviors that we gravitate to more and more as we age.”

Scientists who study stress and resilience say it’s important to think of resilience as an emotional muscle that can be strengthened at any time. ......Here are some of the ways you can build your resilience in middle age.

■ Practice Optimism. Optimism is part genetic, part learned. So if you were born into a family of Eeyores, you can still find your inner Tigger.
■ Rewrite Your Story. When Dr. Charney was recovering from the shooting, he knew that his life was forever changed, but he reframed the situation, focusing on the opportunity the setback presented. “Once you are a trauma victim it stays with you,” he said. “But I knew I could be a role model. I have thousands of students watching my recovery. This gives me a chance to utilize what I’ve learned.”

Study after study has shown that we can benefit from reframing the personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves.
■ Don’t Personalize It. (i.e. self-defeating & self-doubt). We have a tendency to blame ourselves for life’s setbacks and to ruminate about what we should have done differently. In the moment, a difficult situation feels as if it will never end.
■ Remember Your Comebacks. When times are tough, we often remind ourselves that other people — like war refugees or a friend with cancer — have it worse.
■ Support Others. Resilience studies show that people are more resilient when they have strong support networks of friends and family to help them cope with a crisis. But you can get an even bigger resilience boost by giving support.
■ Take Stress Breaks. Times of manageable stress present an opportunity to build your resilience.
■ Go Out of Your Comfort Zone. Resilience doesn’t just come from negative experience. You can build your resilience by putting yourself in challenging situations.
discomforts  resilience  midlife  optimism  Sallie_Krawcheck  comebacks  reframing  serving_others  disconnecting  timeouts  personal_energy  Sheryl_Sandberg  Adam_Grant  living_in_the_moment  self-defeating  self-doubt 
july 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-Old - The New York Times
Pagan Kennedy APRIL 7, 2017

Pagan Kennedy is the author of “Inventology: How We Dream Up Things That Change the World”

it’s easy for us middle-aged folk to believe that the great imaginative leaps are behind us, and that innovation belongs to the kids.

On the contrary, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that late blooming is no anomaly. A 2016 Information Technology and Innovation Foundation study found that inventors peak in their late 40s and tend to be highly productive in the last half of their careers. Similarly, professors at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University in Japan, who studied data about patent holders, found that, in the United States, the average inventor sends in his or her application to the patent office at age 47, and that the highest-value patents often come from the oldest inventors — those over the age of 55.....The more I talked to Dr. Goodenough, the more I wondered if his brilliance was directly tied to his age. After all, he has been thinking about energy problems longer than just about anyone else on the planet.....“I’m old enough to know you can’t close your mind to new ideas. You have to test out every possibility if you want something new.”

When I asked him about his late-life success, he said: “Some of us are turtles; we crawl and struggle along, and we haven’t maybe figured it out by the time we’re 30. But the turtles have to keep on walking.” This crawl through life can be advantageous, he pointed out, particularly if you meander around through different fields, picking up clues as you go along. .... The tapestry reminds him of the divine power that fuels his mind. “I’m grateful for the doors that have been opened to me in different periods of my life,” he said. He believes the glass battery was just another example of the happy accidents that have come his way: “At just the right moment, when I was looking for something, it walked in the door.”
physics  batteries  energy  creativity  biases  patents  midlife  genius  aging  late_bloomers 
april 2017 by jerryking
Getting past ageism and back to work after a late job loss - The Globe and Mail
CAMILLA CORNELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015

.................networking with your own contacts first. “The people who know you understand your talents and what you’re capable of,” he says. “It’s much better than being just another résumé on a desk, where the manager thinks, ‘Oh my gosh, he has 30 years’ experience. He’s probably deader than a doornail.’”.....don’t rule out employment with smaller companies. “The jobs have greater scope, so they’re interesting,” he says. “And because they have greater scope, those companies need to hire people who are experienced. They can’t hire a young buck because he won’t be able to handle everything that needs to happen in that job.”.......The key message for mature job-seekers, says Mr. Richter: Don’t lose faith. “Keep trying and be secure in the fact that you do have a good track record and a well-developed set of skills,” he says. “You do have something to contribute.”..
aging  retirement  Second_Acts  entrepreneurship  ageism  midlife  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  small_business  networking 
may 2016 by jerryking
To Get a Job in Your 50s, Maintain Friendships in Your 40s - The New York Times
SEPT. 26, 2015 | NYT | By PHYLLIS KORKKI.

in the job search process, the number of connections we maintain in our professional and personal networks is often critical.

As people age, they also tend to stay in the same job longer, consistent with a pattern of wanting to put down roots. During that time, the skills people have learned and the job search strategies they once used may become outdated — especially as technology evolves ever more quickly.

The cure for these drawbacks is fairly straightforward. Once you hit your early 40s, even if you are not looking for a job, work to learn new skills and stretch yourself, Professor Wanberg said. Also, keep your networks strong by staying in touch with former colleagues and classmates, along with current co-workers and clients whom you don’t see regularly, she said.
job_search  friendships  networking  aging  midlife  howto  co-workers 
september 2015 by jerryking
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
Mar 26, 2015 | Reuters | BY KATHRYN DOYLE.
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
cancers  midlife  fitness  mens'_health  colorectal  exercise 
april 2015 by jerryking
Eight steps to better health after 40 - The Globe and Mail
ALEX ALLAN - HEALTH ADVISOR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Mar. 08 2015
aging  exercise  midlife  sleep  strength_training  fitness  stretching  gratitude 
march 2015 by jerryking
What You Learn in Your 40s - NYTimes.com
FEB. 28, 2014| NYT | Pamela Druckerman.

There are no soul mates. Not in the traditional sense, at least. In my 20s someone told me that each person has not one but 30 soul mates walking the earth. (“Yes,” said a colleague, when I informed him of this, “and I’m trying to sleep with all of them.”) In fact, “soul mate” isn’t a pre-existing condition. It’s an earned title. They’re made over time.

• You will miss out on some near soul mates. This goes for friendships, too. There will be unforgettable people with whom you have shared an excellent evening or a few days. Now they live in Hong Kong, and you will never see them again. That’s just how life is.
aging  midlife  mid_life_crisis  soul_mates 
march 2014 by jerryking
Entrepreneurs With an Edge - WSJ.com
November 6, 2000 | WSJ| By CHRISTINE LARSON.

Today, Americans at least 50 years old comprise fully 24% of Internet-business founders, according to Industry Standard, a technology trade journal. Older adults can be found in every e-business outpost, from mom-and-pop craft stores to multimillion-dollar public companies. They bring with them not only a wealth of experience, but an appreciation of old-fashioned business values such as customer service and tightfisted cost control.

Equally important, they often enjoy an economic and personal stability that can cushion the bumps of start-up life
aging  entrepreneurship  slight_edge  baby_boomers  retirement  Second_Acts  start_ups  seniorpreneurs  mom-and-pop  midlife  e-commerce 
july 2012 by jerryking
With Kids Gone, Women Find Business - WSJ.com
JUNE 14, 2005

Women Often Discover Their Business Talent After Kids Are Raised

By CAROL HYMOWITZ

In addition, it often takes women longer to believe in themselves enough to seek jobs in which they wield power. "By their 40s and 50s, after observing a few male bosses, women finally begin to say to themselves, 'These guys aren't any smarter than I am,' " says Ms. Liswood. Yet few big corporations are flexible enough to take advantage of women's life cycles by, for example, giving them flexible schedules when they are raising young children and promotion opportunities when they are older. A lot of middle-age women have found their own solution: launching their own businesses. There are 10.6 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., employing 19.1 million people, and two out of three of the new businesses being launched are women-owned. "A lot of these women have worked for big corporations, but at 40 or so when a lot are still stuck in middle management they start thinking, 'I can have more influence and a bigger piece of the pie doing it on my own,' " says Marsha Firestone, founder of the Women Presidents' Organization. The average age of the group's members is 49.
women  movingonup  Carol_Hymowitz  Second_Acts  entrepreneurship  midlife 
november 2011 by jerryking
I'll Be Back -- Delaying Retirement -- Future Planning | Inc.com
Feb 1, 2008 | Inc. Magazine | By Leigh Buchanan |

Business owners may dream of kicking back, all the way back, after years of full-throttle company building. Yet many return to the fray, suffering adrenaline withdrawal and lured by new opportunities. No one has quantified this breed's failure rate when it comes to permanent retirement. But numerous entrepreneurs tell the same tale: "I sold the business and figured I had it made, so I retired. That lasted about three months."...Running a company leaves scant opportunity to personally assist immunization programs in Africa or build irrigation systems in rural Latin America. Yet those are the sorts of experiences that change people and supply direction for meaningful lives, according to Marc Freedman, founder and president of Civic Ventures and author of Encore: Finding Work That Matters in the Second Half of Life. "Join the Peace Corps. Live in a part of the world where there's tremendous need," advises Freedman. "This is your chance to lift yourself out of your comfort zone....For more ideas and insights on creative ways to recharge, take a look at the following books: Encore: Finding Work That Matters in the Second Half of Life, by Marc Freedman; Don't Retire, Rewire!, by Jeri Sedlar and Rick Miners; and Retire Smart, Retire Happy, by Nancy K. Schlossberg.
entrepreneur  books  serial_entrepreneur  midlife  serial_entrepreneurship  retirement  accessories  seniorpreneurs  Second_Acts  purpose  mission-driven 
november 2011 by jerryking
Failure Chronicles -
April 2011 Harvard Business Review by Roger McNamee,
Elevation Partners.

The idea behind Silver Lake was to create a new kind of private equity.
Instead of a typical financial engineering strategy of using high
leverage to squeeze cash out of mature companies, we focused on “midlife
venture capital”—helping mature tech companies create new products that
would transform their businesses. Our approach was based on two
insights: Mature tech companies had low valuations, and investors
overestimated the cost and complexity of product transformations. At any
other time, Silver Lake’s radical idea might have scared investors, but
in the spring of 1999, institutional investors—state pension plans, in
particular—were desperate to put money into the tech sector. It’s hard
to imagine better circumstances in which to test a new investment
strategy.
failure  private_equity  Silver_Lake  fallen_angels  midlife  turnarounds  vulture_investing  Roger_McNamee  insights  institutional_investors  valuations  technology  financial_engineering  transformational  overestimation  radical_ideas 
april 2011 by jerryking
Being Healthy at 100 Takes Some Homework — Jane E. Brody - NYTimes.com
By JANE E. BRODY
Published: October 25, 2010
The good news is that the age of immobility can be modified. As life
expectancy rises and more people live to celebrate their 100th birthday,
postponing the time when physical independence can no longer be
maintained is a goal worth striving for.

Lifestyle choices made in midlife can have a major impact on your
functional ability late in life, he emphasized. If you begin a daily
walking program at age 45, he said, you could delay immobility to 90 and
beyond. If you become a couch potato at 45 and remain so, immobility
can encroach as early as 60.
aging  longevity  strength_training  healthy_lifestyles  midlife 
october 2010 by jerryking
People 55 and Older Start Own Businesses in Growing Numbers - NYTimes.com
March 3, 2010 | New York Times| By STEVEN GREENHOUSE. More
than five million Americans age 55 or older run their own businesses or
are otherwise self-employed, according to the Small Business
Administration. And the number of self-employed people ages 55 to 64 is
soaring, the agency says, climbing 52 percent from 2000 to 2007.

Like Ms. Dolphin, some use money from a buyout to finance a new company.
Some of these entrepreneurs were already retired, but after seeing
their 401(k) retirement plans plunge in value, created a business in a
quest for extra income. Some had lost their jobs and, after months of
searching for work, started a business to make ends meet, perhaps
catering, cabinet making or doing photography.
retirement  baby_boomers  entrepreneurship  seniorpreneurs  self-employment  aging  midlife 
march 2010 by jerryking

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