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jerryking : military_academies   17

Private service held for John McCain before burial at Naval Academy - The Globe and Mail
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2, 2018 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | SUSAN WALSH
ANNAPOLIS, MD.

One scheduled speaker at the service, Sen. Lindsey Graham, said before the service that he would tell the audience that “nobody loved a soldier more than John McCain, that I bear witness to his commitment to have their back, travel where they go, never let them be forgotten.”..........“There’s a lesson to be learned this week about John McCain,” said Graham, R-S.C.

“No. 1, Americans appreciate military service. ... If you work hard and do your homework and know what you’re talking about, people will listen to you. That if you pick big causes bigger than yourself, you’ll be remembered,” he told “Fox News Sunday.”

“He tried to drain the swamp before it was cool, that you can fight hard and still be respected. If you forgive, people appreciate it, and if you admit to mistakes, you look good as a stronger man. That’s the formula, John McCain. This was a civics lesson for anybody who wanted to listen. Why do we remember this man? Because of the way he conducted his public life.”
civics  John_McCain  obituaries  tributes  lessons_learned  military_academies 
september 2018 by jerryking
Book Review: General Albert C. Wedemeyer - WSJ.com
September 9, 2012 | WSJ | By JONATHAN W. JORDAN.
The Man With a Plan
A warrior who helped lead the Allies to victory armed with charts, graphs and a meticulous attention to detail.

Albert Coady Wedemeyer (1897-1989) was from an upper-middle-class family in Omaha, Neb. Fascinated by European history and the grand strategy of empires as a youth, he was inexorably drawn to the life of a soldier and graduated from West Point in 1919. He foresaw another war with Germany and, in the late 1930s, attended the German army's prestigious general-staff school, the Kriegsakademie. There he learned the art of blitzkrieg alongside his future enemies. He watched Nazi brownshirts strut around Berlin, venting their hatred against Jews. He was in Vienna during the Anschluss, and he saw the Czechoslovakian crisis unfold from the German perspective.

Wedemeyer's report summarizing German tactics and organization brought him to the attention of George C. Marshall, who in 1939 became the Army's chief of staff. Marshall assigned Wedemeyer to the War Plans Division and tasked him with reducing America's mobilization requirements to a single document. In the summer of 1941, in response to a request from Roosevelt, Wedemeyer's team expanded this into a blueprint on how to defeat America's likely enemies in a future war.
1919  book_reviews  WWII  U.S._Army  logistics  generalship  warfare  war  blitzkrieg  military_academies  George_Marshall  mobilization  grand_strategy  '30s  blueprints  detail_oriented  West_Point 
september 2012 by jerryking
Expeditionary Leaders, CINCs, and Chairmen Shaping Air Force Officers for Leadership Roles in the Twenty-First Century
Winter 2000| Aerospace Power Journal | DR. JAMES M. SMITH.

Editorial Abstract: In this article, APJ is honored to play a part in announcing to the Air Force the Developing Aerospace Leaders project. The twenty-first-century international environment suggests that our aerospace leaders may need to be more skilled in strategic thinking than their predecessors. How should the Air Force change the currently stovepiped career-and-assignment structure to develop strategy-savvy officers with experience broad enough to lead in an uncertain future? Rising to the challenge of producing such strategist-leaders, the Air Force chief of staff initiated the Developing Aerospace Leaders project in October 1999. Dr. Smith, a member of that team, outlines some of the challenges and proposes one possible solution requiring a substantially changed system of professional military education with specially selected “strategist grooming” assignments for its graduates.
USAF  strategic_thinking  leadership_development  21st._century  military_academies 
july 2012 by jerryking
War Without End - WSJ.com
October 10, 2001| WSJ | this is an e-mail exchange that occurred Sept. 19 between a senior cadet at West Point and one of his professors, retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey.

Cadet: Could you describe what you think the United States should consider as an "endstate" on the matter of dealing with terrorists? Eradication, containment, or some other option? And what would the United States consider the literal and figurative center of gravity?

Gen. McCaffrey: Great issue to consider . . . we have too liberally borrowed from the language of science to deal with the imperfections of political and security analysis.

There will be no endstate . . . we will, if successful, manage this chronic threat to our survival, economy, and self-confidence by dramatically lowering the risk. We will build a series of defensive programs that will make a multiple order of magnitude increase in our day-to-day security. Second, we will form a coalition based on common danger. Much of the globe will join us to leverage foreign intelligence services and security forces to fight these FTO's forward in the battle area. Finally, we will at last take the gloves off and use integrated military power to find, fix, and destroy these organizations.
Barry_McCaffrey  military_academies  9/11  security_&_intelligence  terrorism  endgame  orders-of-magnitude  imperfections  West_Point 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Sunshine Warrior - NYTimes.com
By BILL KELLER September 22, 2002

His inclination to act derives, too, from his analytical style, a residue, perhaps, of the mathematician he started out to be. In almost any discussion, he tends to be the one focusing on the most often overlooked variable in decision making, the cost of not acting. ....the tensions between State and Defense are rooted in starkly different views of how America should deal with the world. The State Department tends to see the world as a set of problems to be handled, using the tools of professional diplomacy and striving for international consensus. This Defense Department tends to define leadership as more (in the Pentagon's favorite buzzword of the moment) ''forward leaning,'' including a willingness to act unilaterally if need be and to employ muscle. Rumsfeld and Cheney, who have been friends since the Nixon administration, are visceral advocates of this more assertive view, but Wolfowitz is its theorist -- its Kissinger, as one admirer put it. ...Dennis Ross went to work for Wolfowitz shortly after writing a paper trashing the work of Team B. ''What I always found in him that separated him from everybody else on that side of the political spectrum is not that he didn't have predispositions, but that he was much more open, much more intellectually open, to different kinds of interpretations,'' Ross says....''In the end, it has to come down to a careful weighing of things we can't know with precision, the costs of action versus the costs of inaction, the costs of action now versus the costs of action later.''
U.S._military  leadership  leadership_development  U.S._Army  military_academies  red_teams  Dennis_Ross  Paul_Wolfowitz  cost_of_inaction  Pentagon  U.S._State_Department  diplomacy  consensus  interpretation 
may 2012 by jerryking
Fort Leavenworth and the Eclipse of Nationhood - 96.09
September 1996 | The Atlantic | by Robert D. Kaplan.

Here historical precedent rules. Officers study previous battles and
interventions, and the political circumstances surrounding them, the way
law students study torts. The underlying message is that knowledge of
the past helps foresight, and those with foresight accrue power....."The
military," Major Kellett-Forsyth told me, "is in the nation-state
world. The media represents the postmodern, or transnational world.
Overseas, [U.S. soldiers] sit down with each other. The American media
sits down with foreign journalists: that's its socialization group."
U.S._Army  Robert_Kaplan  military_academies  foresight  civilian-military_relations  think_tanks  far-sightedness  historical_precedents 
august 2011 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - The Military’s Mission Of Mediocrity
May 20, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By BRUCE FLEMING. the Naval
Academy, where I have been a professor for 23 years, has lost its way.
The same is true of the other service academies. They are a net loss to
the taxpayers who finance them, as well as a huge disappointment to
their students, who come expecting reality to match reputation. They
need to be fixed or abolished....Instead of better officers, the
academies produce burned-out midshipmen and cadets. They come to us
thinking they’ve entered a military Camelot, and find a maze of petty
rules with no visible future application.
military_academies  disappointment  mediocrity 
may 2010 by jerryking
William McGurn: A Salute to West Point - WSJ.com
JANUARY 4, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By WILLIAM MCGURN.
Whether character can be taught is an age-old question; usually we refer
to its being built. West Point does not pretend its cadets are immune
from the normal temptations of our culture. After all, they come from
the same towns and high schools other universities draw from. The
difference is that at West Point, words such as duty, honor and country
are spoken without irony—and a scandal is a scandal because behavior is
still measured against standards.
education  inspiration  traditions  military_academies  values  militaries  West_Point 
january 2010 by jerryking
That '70s Show: Detroit - WSJ.com
July 8, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | By PAUL INGRASSIA.
Detroit executives might drop by their favorite bookstore before their
summer vacation and pick up a book published last year by Col. Thomas A.
Koldtiz, head of the department of behavioral sciences at West Point.
It's titled "In Extremis Leadership: Leading as if Your Life Depended on
It." There are bound to be some applicable lessons.
automotive_industry  leadership  book_reviews  military_academies  books  life_and_death  West_Point 
june 2009 by jerryking

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