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Yes, Healthful Fast Food Is Possible. But Edible?
April 3, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By MARK BITTMAN

After the success of companies like Whole Foods, and healthful (or theoretically healthful) brands like Annie’s and Kashi, there’s now a market for a fast-food chain that’s not only healthful itself, but vegetarian-friendly, sustainable and even humane. And, this being fast food: cheap. “It is significant, and I do believe it is coming from consumer desire to have choices and more balance,” says Andy Barish, a restaurant analyst at Jefferies LLC, the investment bank. “And it’s not just the coasts anymore.” ...What I’d like is a place that serves only good options, where you don’t have to resist the junk food to order well, and where the food is real — by which I mean dishes that generally contain few ingredients and are recognizable to everyone, not just food technologists....In recent years, the fast-food industry has started to heed these new demands. Billions of dollars have been invested in more healthful fast-food options, and the financial incentives justify these expenditures. About half of all the money spent on food in the United States is for meals eaten outside the home. And last year McDonald’s earned $5.5 billion in profits on $88 billion in sales. If a competitor offered a more healthful option that was able to capture just a single percent of that market share, it would make $55 million. Chipotle, the best newcomer of the last generation, has beaten that 1 percent handily. Last year, sales approached $3 billion. In the fourth quarter, they grew by 17 percent over the same period in the previous year.

Numbers are tricky to pin down for more healthful options because the fast food industry doesn’t yet have a category for “healthful.”...Chipotle combines the best aspects of Nouveau Junk to create a new category that we might call Improved Fast Food. At Chipotle, the food is fresher and tastes much better than traditional fast food. The sourcing, production and cooking is generally of a higher level; and the overall experience is more pleasant. The guacamole really is made on premises, and the chicken (however tasteless) is cooked before your eyes. It’s fairly easy to eat vegan there, but those burritos can pack on the calories. As a competitor told me, “Several brands had a head start on [the Chipotle founder Steve] Ells, but he kicked their [expletive] with culture and quality. It’s not shabby for assembly-line steam-table Mexican food. It might be worth $10 billion right now.” (It is.)

Chipotle no longer stands alone in the Improved Fast Food world: Chop’t, Maoz, Freshii, Zoës Kitchen and several others all have their strong points. And — like Chipotle — they all have their limitations, starting with calories and fat.
...Veggie Grill, Lyfe Kitchen, Tender Greens and others have solved the challenge of bringing formerly upscale, plant-based foods to more of a mass audience. But the industry seems to be focused on a niche group that you might call the health-aware sector of the population. (If you’re reading this article, you’re probably in it.) Whole Foods has proved that you can build a publicly traded business, with $16 billion in market capitalization, by appealing to this niche. But fast food is, at its core, a class issue. Many people rely on that Tendercrisp because they need to, and our country’s fast-food problem won’t be solved — no matter how much innovation in vegan options or high-tech ovens — until the prices come down and this niche sector is no longer niche. ...Soda consumption is down; meat consumption is down; sales of organic foods are up; more people are expressing concern about G.M.O.s, additives, pesticides and animal welfare. The lines out the door — first at Chipotle and now at Maoz, Chop’t, Tender Greens and Veggie Grill — don’t lie. According to a report in Advertising Age, McDonald’s no longer ranks in the top 10 favorite restaurants of Millennials, a group that comprises as many as 80 million people.
Lyfe_Kitchen  Mark_Bittman  fast-food  Burger_King  Chipotle  plant-based  vegetables  fresh_produce  vegan  McDonald's  social_classes  perishables  Whole_Foods  millennials  fast-casual  new_categories 
april 2013 by jerryking
Jobs, jobs, jobs! The future is brighter than you think
Feb. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente.

if the idea of working for someone else doesn’t appeal to barista girl, she’s in luck. Thanks to the IT revolution, starting your own business is easier than ever, as American thinker Walter Russell Mead has pointed out: All you need is a computer and an Internet connection. You can provide math tutoring to kids, music instruction, even long-distance psychological counselling. You don’t even have to be in the same country as your clients. You can find cheap marketing information to identify your potential customers, and you can reach them via social media. You can buy inexpensive accounting and billing software. If you have employees, you can even get HR advice online.

The IT revolution is wiping out entire industries, like bookstores and travel agents. But it is also creating virtually unlimited opportunities for new service businesses.
Margaret_Wente  entrepreneurship  Desire2Learn  disruption  self-employment  IT  millennials  Walter_Russell_Mead  bookstores  travel_agents  new_businesses 
february 2013 by jerryking
O, brave new TempWorld
September 29, 2000| Fortune |Review by Larry Keller, CNN.com/career Senior Writer
The Good News About Careers: How You'll Be Working in the Next Decade'
By Barbara Moses, Ph.D.(Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer)

To cope with this uncertainty, Moses asserts that workers must learn to become "career activists."
Know what kind of work engages you and gives your life meaning.

Sell yourself. People in their 20s and early 30s are more comfortable doing this than those who are older, she says. For the latter, she offers advice on marketing oneself in a way that's effective without feeling like a phony.

OLD OR NEW?



See if you're closer to Barbara Moses' old- or new-style worker. More



Network with others. Moses stresses that this means developing mutually supportive relationships with others, not using people or indiscriminately exchanging business cards at every function you attend.

Stay current in your field and continue to develop skills and knowledge outside it.

...It's not just rank-and-file workers who must cope with a rapidly changing workplace. The challenges can be just as daunting for managers. Moses suggests they incorporate 10 strategies aimed at keeping the troops happy and productive.

Among her recommendations: Provide skill-building opportunities, sabbaticals, career planning, mentoring and flexible benefits. She also proposes that managers try to give employees a sense of ownership of the projects on which they work.

September 29, 2000
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  books  gig_economy  book_reviews  self-reliance  freelancing  workplaces  generations  solo  contractors  millennials  rapid_change 
december 2012 by jerryking
Clear Conscience -- Clear Profit - WSJ.com
September 29, 2006 | WSJ | By N.R. NARAYANA MURTHY.

Our experience has shown there are five elements of success in today's global marketplace:

(1) Listen to other people's ideas, especially those of the younger generations. Devise ways of management to tap the brilliance of young minds. Some of our best ideas grew from monthly "Ideation Days," brainstorming sessions led by employees under 30. Keep doors open. Let young workers walk into senior managers' offices to present their ideas without going through "proper channels." Retire early enough to give younger people a chance to take responsibility while still enthusiastic.
(2) Maintain meritocracy. Build a company where people of different nationalities, genders and religions compete in an environment of intense competition and total courtesy. Do this by using data to decide which ideas are adopted. Our motto: "In God we trust. Everyone else brings data to the table."
(3) Benchmark yourself against internal and external competitors to make sure you are doing everything faster today than you did yesterday, or last quarter.
(4) Continue to develop better ideas. Build something great, and then break it to build something better. Never fear being insufficiently focused on a single core business. As long as your most brilliant people are continuously experimenting with the best services to provide to customers, the results will turn out right in the end.
(5) Maintain pressure to implement the best ideas with ever-higher levels of excellence.

Leadership is key to inspiring employees to make these elements part of their daily lives. The golden core of leadership is the ability to raise aspirations. Aspiration doesn't just build companies, it builds civilizations. It changes a set of ordinary people into a team of extraordinary talents, empowering them to convert plausible impossibilities into convincing possibilities.
aspirations  benchmarking  brainstorming  CEOs  data_driven  experimentation  globalization  ideas  ideation  idea_generation  India  Infosys  ksfs  leadership  listening  meritocratic  millennials 
november 2012 by jerryking
What's All the Fuss About Being Canadian?
August 25th, 2003 | TIME Magazine | Stephen Handelman. The message from non-Canadians at Couchiching was clear: Rise above parochial concerns and help change North America, if you really want to change the world.

Canadian? Sure but not confined by it.
Canadian  national_identity  youth  millennials  sovereignty 
september 2012 by jerryking
Oh, those lazy young people
Aug. 24 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Todd Hirsch.

The first thing a young person should do is get an education. Not coincidentally, postsecondary education has been a huge issue burning a hole in Quebec politics this summer. But rising tuition fees or not, there is no single factor more effective in boosting creativity and productivity than an educated work force.

Travelling or living abroad is also important. The human mind needs to see different patterns and systems in order to tap its full creative potential, and seeing how people and economies work in other parts of the world is enormously helpful for this.

Finally, working in the community offers tremendous benefits. By getting involved in an arts group, a not-for-profit charity, a neighbourhood sports league – it almost doesn’t matter what as long as the interests of others are at the forefront – self-awareness and empathy are enhanced. And from this flows innovation and creativity.

Economic productivity isn’t about working longer hours, nor is it about finding a warm body to fill a dead-end job. It’s about tapping human potential. It’s about spawning new industries – ones that perhaps need some risk-taker champions along the way. And it’s about inspiring a new generation of young Canadians to say “this is our economy.”
productivity  youth  creative_renewal  travel  creativity  Millennials  Todd_Hirsch  self-awareness  empathy  innovation  education  new_businesses  perspectives  volunteering  arts  nonprofit  human_potential  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
in_the_real_world  Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism  self-sacrifice  young_people  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
Degree Of Challenge
May 1, 2003 | American Demographics |Byline: SANDRA YIN

Despite modest individual earnings, college students as a whole represent a multibillion dollar market. The allure for marketers is the opportunity to lock in relationships with the future's more affluent consumers while they are still in school, when they are open to experimenting with products and sharing their opinions with their peers. The first step is to understand college students' attitudes and purchasing behavior. Today, among the most cost-effective media for reaching students on campus is the old college newspaper. At least 72% of college students report having read one of the past five issues. In addition to traditional media, guerrilla marketing, or viral marketing, has proven effective in spurring word of mouth. College students are trendsetters and early adopters who may be a first step to reaching broader market segments. Though marketers may encounter challenges as they build relationships with these young adults before they begin their financial ascent, the trouble may well be worth it.
Colleges_&_Universities  students  challenges  mass_media  guerrilla_marketing  millennials  buying_power  purchase_decisions  locked_in 
july 2012 by jerryking
8 Things You Can Do To Evolve Your Career - Business Insider
Shira Levine|December 03, 2011|
There's no such thing as a second career.

We only have evolving careers, says marketing expert James Marshall Reilly. Reilly wrote Shake the World: It's Not About Finding a Job, It's About Creating a Life. The book tackles the job market, social entrepreneurship and philanthro-capitalism, and will be released in late December....Reilly's book talks to the "young game-changers" of this generation and seeks to discover how they found success. By game-changers, he means entrepreneurs, both business and social. There are no Young Turk investment bankers, politicians or cancer doctors in his book. These are people who design iPod covers, magazine publishers, serial technology entrepreneurs and the founders of innovative non-profits. There is not a Rotary Club membership between them.
book_reviews  books  start_ups  career_paths  career  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  new_graduates  millennials  entrepreneurship  game_changers 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Entrepreneurial Generation
November 12, 2011 | NYTimes.com | By WILLIAM DERESIEWICZ

What’s underneath hipster culture ? What's their idea of life? What's their stance with respect to the world?.......
The millennial affect is the affect of the salesman. Consider the other side of the equation, the Millennials’ characteristic social form. Here’s what I see around me, in the city and the culture: food carts, 20-somethings selling wallets made from recycled plastic bags, boutique pickle companies, techie start-ups, Kickstarter, urban-farming supply stores and bottled water that wants to save the planet.

Today’s ideal social form is not the commune or the movement or even the individual creator as such; it’s the small business. Every artistic or moral aspiration — music, food, good works, what have you — is expressed in those terms.

Call it Generation Sell.

Bands are still bands, but now they’re little businesses, as well: self-produced, self-published, self-managed. When I hear from young people who want to get off the careerist treadmill and do something meaningful, they talk, most often, about opening a restaurant. Nonprofits are still hip, but students don’t dream about joining one, they dream about starting one. In any case, what’s really hip is social entrepreneurship — companies that try to make money responsibly, then give it all away......The small business is the idealized social form of our time. Our culture hero is not the artist or reformer, not the saint or scientist, but the entrepreneur. (Think of Steve Jobs, our new deity.) Autonomy, adventure, imagination: entrepreneurship comprehends all this and more for us. The characteristic art form of our age may be the business plan.

AND that, I think, is the real meaning of the Millennial affect — which is, like the entrepreneurial ideal, essentially everyone’s now. Today’s polite, pleasant personality is, above all, a commercial personality. It is the salesman’s smile and hearty handshake, because the customer is always right and you should always keep the customer happy. If you want to get ahead, said Benjamin Franklin, the original business guru, make yourself pleasing to others.
beatniks  entrepreneurship  hippies  hipsters  millennials  punks  slackers  small_business  youth_cultures 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Unused Cellphone App: 'Calling' - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by By JOSEPH DE AVILA. The Unused Cellphone App: 'Calling'
Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  smartphones  mobile_phones  mobile_applications  iPhone  millennials 
february 2010 by jerryking
A high-tech sports revolution
Jan. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Stephen Brunt. The
boomers and their buying power are heading toward the sunset, and the
talk in the sports business now is about how to attract and hold a
different generation, with a different, diminished attention span,
accustomed to having the whole world laid out for them, every minute of
every day, literally at their fingertips.

Getting them out of their homes and into the building or into the
ballpark, getting their eyes to linger for more than a few seconds as a
game flickers across a screen – not to mention the advertising that pays
the freight – has become the core challenge.
sports  consumption  Stephen_Brunt  revolution  arenas  future  challenges  LBMA  sports_marketing  baby_boomers  millennials  attention  advertising  buying_power  stadiums  attention_spans 
january 2010 by jerryking
Finding Anchors in the Storm: Mentors
JANUARY 27, 2009 WSJ article by TODDI GUTNER that speaks to the
economic crisis reducing opportunities for millennials, therefore
mentoring becomes a more strategic avenue for their career development.
career  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  millennials 
january 2009 by jerryking
I spent my twenties obsessing about what I should do.
April 25, 2008 G& M column by Barbara Moses aimed at 20-something new grads confused about career and life choices.
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  life_skills  career  millennials 
january 2009 by jerryking

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