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jerryking : mindsets   61

How to step back and rethink your career goals
SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | Financial Times | by Elizabeth Uviebinene.

Mobile apps: Wunderlist and Trello.
Podcasts on the “back to life” mindset: How to Fail with Elizabeth Day, Better Life Lab and Without Fail
Newsletters: The Roundup by Otegha Uwagba

Autumn now brings a sense of trepidation — it can be an unsettling time for those who are starting new opportunities and a source of anxiety for those who feel stuck in a rut while others move on......I look at autumn a little differently, seeing it as a time to reset and an opportunity to make small changes to my routine without the cynicism that is attached to new year’s resolutions...... a little refresh now can go a long way...... it’s more about making time to check in with them, to realign and reprioritize.......The first step is to check in on your long-term goals, the ones you want to achieve in a few years. Is your current trajectory aligning with those goals? If not, why not? What can you implement today to get you back on track?....write down what you’ve achieved this year and positioning it within the overall business objectives that show your individual impact......journal when it comes to both long-term and weekly career planning. Spending time writing down objectives and reflecting on how best to get there in the coming weeks and months can provide a sense of control......prioritizing is essential to maintaining a healthy work and life balance. Journal five goals for the next four months and then place them in priority order, cross off the bottom three, to leave the two most important ones. That's where to focus one's time and energy......."Find your tribe”. A sense of community is key to battling the loneliness that this time of year can bring. This could be done online by signing up to a newsletter, or via community groups and live events....Attend conferences.....use this time of year to consider making a career change, aiming for the next promotion or starting a side project, ....reflect, plot and plan on how best to get there. Sneaking small changes into our working life can make all the difference.
autumn  conferences  goals  howto  journaling  long-term  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  mobile_applications  networking  podcasts  priorities  reflections  résumés  self-organization  sense_of_control  tribes  work_life_balance 
4 weeks ago by jerryking
Why You Should Try to Be a Little More Scarce
May 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cindy Lamothe.

* Conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, but playing a little hard to get has its advantages.
* Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.”
* John Lees, a Britain-based career strategist and the author of “How to Get a Job You Love.”
* Liz Ryan, founder of Human Workplace and the author of “Reinvention Roadmap: Break the Rules to Get the Job You Want and Career You Deserve.”
* Shirli Kopelman, author of “Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business,”

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Studies show that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become less available.....the scarcity principle says that people are more attracted to those options or opportunities that are rare, unique or dwindling in availability,”. The underlying principle is “reactance”: Essentially, when we think something is limited to us, we tend to want it more....it’s possible to harness this concept and increase our appeal in things like negotiations and career advancement.....if you find yourself becoming overzealous over every little opportunity that comes your way, here are a few ways to keep things in balance:

(1) Be less eager - Appearing readily available can work against you....This comes down to economics — if you’re in low supply and high demand, you’re worth more. Making something harder to get, “tends to increase at least the perception of the value, if not its actual value.”....tell people that you're “..selective with who you work with, but you would consider working with or for them.”... “Well, I do have a couple of other projects that I’m working on. However, I could prioritize this for you if you want.”

(2) Don’t jump the gun - It’s easy to become excited when an unexpected opportunity presents itself, Ms. Ryan said, but remember that your power in any negotiation is related to your ability to walk away. Once you have interest, channel that into due diligence, Mr. Lees said. “Research the organization as if you were going to invest half your life savings in it,” he said. It’s also important to continually check in with your gut, Ms. Ryan added, and remember: Don’t accept an offer before fully considering the terms.

(3) Know your market value - continually assessing our market worth, “so that if an unexpected opportunity comes up, you don’t have to rush and do a slack job on this crucial factor.”...Keep an updated spreadsheet on hand with a list of your skills and achievements so you can quickly review it when you have an offer. You also have to know how much to charge for your services beforehand. The idea is to plan ahead so you’re not scrambling in the moment.

(4) Adopt an abundance mind-set - Recognizing that there are unlimited possibilities can give you the security and confidence you need to create successful outcomes. ....reframe how we use scarcity and abundance in our own head before we can apply it outwardly. When you worry about all the things you’re going to lose out on if you don’t take a particular opportunity, you’re using the scarcity mind-set on yourself rather than as a persuasion strategy, he said. “You’re at a real disadvantage mentally.”

(5) Trust the process - appearing less available isn’t about limiting our enthusiasm or being unnecessarily hard on ourselves. It’s about trusting in our own self-worth so we can be proactive, experts say. This means mindfully aligning our excitement into strategy....“Emphasize the uniqueness of your resources and your collaborative approach"
abundance  bank_shots  books  conventional_wisdom  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  opportunities  overeagerness  overzealous  preparation  scarcity  selectivity  self-worth  think_differently  unexpected 
may 2019 by jerryking
Black Folk's Guide to Making Big Money in America
A primer on personal finance, business and real estate. It is truly comprehensive and a must read for anyone serious about improving their financial situation.
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First, Trower-Subira emphasizes the central importance of home ownership as a source of equity capital. He decried the usage of earned income and accumulated home equity to fuel (conspicuous) consumption binges. Trower-Subira got it right when he said that real estate should be the base asset for African Americans from which to build wealth. As long as you borrow against your home to acquire other, income producing assets, you are doing yourself a favor by pursuing homeownership.

Second, he stressed the importance of financial assets in building wealth. Trower-Subira puts forth a brilliant explanation of the types of assets that produce income and that African Americans in particular should endeavor to pursue (real estate is just one of several).

Third, Trower-Subira emphasizes the importance of continuing education combined with an asset-based approach to wealth building. Trower-Subira wrote in the context of his day, but now the game has shifted somewhat. That is not to say that the problems of his day are no more; indeed, many of the problems of his day still relentlessly follow the African American community, and in too many instances, the problem have actually gotten worse. Although we are presented with new opportunities, we also face new challenges- on top of the same old challenges that we have yet to vanquish.
'80s  advice  African-Americans  Amazon  books  business  home_ownership  mindsets  personal_finance  primers  real_estate  self-help  wealth_creation 
april 2019 by jerryking
Why tech titans need an empathy handbook
April 4, 2018 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett
..........if engineers want to be better understood by consumers, they need to learn empathy for mindsets that were different from their own, or hire non-engineers. .....These days, Silicon Valley executives need to relearn these lessons — not only to make their gadgets more user-friendly, but also to create a better social contract to underpin technology in a wider sense. As criticism of the tech sector — in particular, concerns about the power of Silicon Valley — gathers momentum, the response of most of its executives has been very defensive......there is an epistemological angle too. Most of the people running the big tech companies today have come from engineering, computing or mathematical backgrounds. They are used to working by deduction and logical steps, not always prioritising emotion or empathy. They want to assemble the facts before jumping on to a public stage or making a strategic policy decision.

That works well if you are designing code or running a fast-growing team of engineers. After all, one of the striking features of the employee base at places such as Google or Facebook is just how homogenous this tribe tends to be......The problem is that what might seem routine from a software-engineering standpoint is not necessarily normal or acceptable for the wider world, and tech companies are now having to confront angry politicians, journalists and consumer groups, all of whom operate within different frameworks.....Tech executives now need to go further, not just listening to outside voices but actively trying to empathize with and understand them. .......we are all creatures of our own cultural environment, saddled with endless biases and assumptions. But, somehow, those titans of tech need to get a lesson in empathy, and see the world through non-tech eyes.
empathy  Silicon_Valley  engineering  mindsets  Gillian_Tett  empathy_vacuum  homogeneity  Big_Tech  tribes 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Memo: Five Rules for Your Economic Liberation: John Hope Bryant: 9781523084562: Amazon.com: Books
True power in this world comes from economic independence, but too many people have too much month left at the end of their money. John Hope Bryant, founder and CEO of Operation HOPE, illuminates the path toward liberation that is hiding in plain sight. His message is simple: the supermajority of people who live in poverty, whom Bryant calls the invisible class, as well as millions in the struggling middle class, haven't gotten “the memo”—until now.

Building on his personal experience of rising up from economically disadvantaged circumstances and his work with Operation HOPE, Bryant teaches readers five rules that lay the foundation for achieving financial freedom. He emphasizes the inseparable connection between “inner capital” (mindset, relationships, knowledge, and spirit) and “outer capital” (financial wealth and property). “If you have inner capital,” Bryant writes, “you can never be truly poor. If you lack inner capital, all the money in the world cannot set you free.”

Bryant gives readers tools for empowerment by covering everything from achieving basic financial literacy to investing in positive relationships and approaching wealth with a completely new attitude. He makes this bold and controversial claim: “Once you have satisfied your basic sustenance needs—food, water, health, and a roof over your head—poverty has more to do with your head than your wallet.”

Bryant wants to restore readers' “silver rights,” giving them the ability to succeed and prosper no matter what very real roadblocks society puts in their way. We have more power than we realize, if only we can recognize and claim it. “We are our first capital,” Bryant writes. “We are the CEOs of our own lives.
African-Americans  books  economically_disadvantaged  economic_empowerment  individual_agency  individual_autonomy  It's_up_to_me  James_Baldwin  knowledge  mindsets  personal_economy  poverty  relationships 
august 2017 by jerryking
Big Companies Should Collaborate with Startups
Eddie YoonSteve Hughes
FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Growth is increasingly hard to come by, so large companies are increasingly looking to entrepreneurs to help them find it. In the food and beverage category, growth came from 20,000 small companies outside of the top 100, which together saw revenue grow by $17 billion dollars.
Despite that aggregate revenue growth, not every startup is successful — in fact, the vast majority will fail.

Ironically, startups and established companies would both improve their success rates if they collaborated instead of competed. Startups and established companies bring two distinct and equally integral skills to the table. Startups excel at giving birth to successful proof of concepts; larger companies are much better at successfully scaling proof of concepts.

Startups are better at detecting and unlocking emerging and latent demand. But they often stumble at scaling their proof of concept, not only because they’re often doing it for the first time, but also because the skills necessary for creating are not the same as scaling. Startups must be agile and adapt their value proposition several times until they get it right. According to Forbes, 58% of startups successfully figure out a clear market need for what they have.

In contrast, big companies often end up launching things they can make, not what people want.

Successful collaboration between startups and established companies must go beyond financial deals: it must be personal and mission-oriented.....areas of emerging and latent demand are often highly concentrated.... spend time physically in hotbeds specific to your sector. ....met people...walk the aisles ...... explore up and coming datasets. SPINs is a retail measurement company that covers the natural and organic grocers. Yet too many companies don’t even bother to acquire this data because they dismiss it as too small to matter.....Just as important as personal knowledge are personal relationships. ...spend time with customers....skew more toward emerging customers......connect with key people who have tight connections with both startups and established companies in your industry.....collaboration needs to be mission-oriented, meaning it has to be focused on something larger than financial success. ......Executives who wish to tap into the growth of these smaller companies will find that having a big checkbook is not going to be enough, and that waiting for an investment banker to bring them deals is the wrong approach. A mercenary mindset will only go so far. When big companies try to engage with startups, a missionary mindset will create better odds of success.
large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  scaling  start_ups  collaboration  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  information_sources  personal_relationships  personal_knowledge  HBR  growth  funding  M&A  success_rates  latent  hidden  proof-of-concepts  mindsets  missionaries  mission-driven  Mondolez  cultural_clash  Gulliver_strategies 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why wealthy families lose their fortunes in three generations - The Globe and Mail
AUGUSTA DWYER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017

Among the causes of the phenomenon are taxes, inflation, bad investment decisions and the natural dilution of assets as they are shared among generations of heirs.

Yet among the most compelling causes are younger family members who are ill-prepared or unwilling to shoulder the responsibility of wealth stewardship. They have grown up with plenty of money and are a step or two removed from the work ethic and drive of the people who made it for them.

“There is a risk of entitlement that comes to the fore, and that is where things tend to go off the rails,” says Thane Stenner, director of wealth management at Vancouver-based StennerZohny Investment Partners, part of Richardson GMP.

The key to overcoming that, he adds, is communication, which means “family discussions, family meetings, and trying to be very proactively engaging with the next generation, rather than reactive.

“Successful families are basically talking a lot to them about what the previous generation has done and engaging them by asking about their own dreams and aspirations. And really helping to enlighten them, or get them excited about their own future and how the family can help fund that future, but in a very responsible, business-like way.”

According to Mr. McCullough, almost as much time and effort should be spent in preparing the heirs to receive the wealth as actually investing and managing it.

“That involves understanding what your family’s set of values is,” he says.
attrition_rates  wealth_management  family  values  stewardship  generational_wealth  Tom_McCullough  Northwood  family-owned_businesses  family_business  Communicating_&_Connecting  mission_statements  entitlements  mindsets  family_office  work_ethic  heirs 
january 2017 by jerryking
Yes, It's a Tech Bubble. Here's What You Need to Know
SEPTEMBER 2015 ISSUE | | Inc.com | BY JEFF BERCOVICI.

"Investors change priorities. Soon, they may be telling you, 'We want to see profitability at the expense of growth.' So you need to think about the levers you can pull to make that happen." (JCK- How does redirect from a growth mindset and plans to one of profitability?--Scott Kupor)

First, there will be some upside. Sky-high home and office rents in certain cities and neighborhoods will drop, and if you're not in the market yet, you'll have a great buying opportunity. If you're hiring, the drum-tight talent market for anyone with programming skills should loosen up considerably, although big companies may reap the benefits more than small ones, says Oliver Ryan, founder of the tech recruiting firm Lab 8 Ventures. "The 'war' for engineering talent is primarily a supply-and-demand issue, so a widespread pullback of venture capital would likely diminish demand to a point," he says.......a burst bubble could also create new types of adversity. ....suppliers and distribution partners may disappear, your business notwithstanding......money is time, and the best way to ride out a downturn is with a couple of years' worth of cash stashed in your mattress. Just be sure you're prepared to deliver a couple of extra years' worth of growth, because you'll need to if you follow the raise-more-than-you-need plan. "It's not without risk," .... "You'll have to make the numbers to justify your valuation at some point, so you're raising the hurdle on yourself."......To make it over the chasm, you have to show investors traction and momentum--a PowerPoint slide with a line pointing up and to the right. A startup can often manufacture these things by spending enough on advertising and customer acquisition. But the attributes so richly rewarded in the current environment aren't necessarily the same ones that will be selected for once the bubble bursts......In October 2008, Doug Leone of Sequoia Capital gave a famous presentation titled "R.I.P. Good Times," in which he counseled entrepreneurs to squirrel away their nuts for winter and "spend every dollar as if it was your last." In hindsight Leone's forecast, and his warning was seen as alarmist......be more careful about the terms on which you raise money as that "extreme end of a cycle" approaches. Typically, you'll seek the highest possible valuation: (a) It minimizes dilution and generates publicity that attracts talent and clients and even more capital. But as valuations settle--and the inevitable rise of interest rates all but guarantees they will--founders who overreached will struggle to support, or defend, those valuations. In the worst instances, if you finagled an extra 10 or 20 % of paper value by granting investors aggressive downside protections--the "features" and "ratchets" that VCs use to make reckless bets without incurring real risk--you'll find yourself downgraded from owner to employee. "
boom-to-bust  bubbles  downside  economic_downturn  founders  growth  investors  mindsets  overreach  profitability  priorities  Sequoia  start_ups  Silicon_Valley  silver_linings  upside  vc  venture_capital  war_for_talent 
october 2016 by jerryking
How to have an ‘attitude of gratitude’
Jul. 19, 2016 | The Globe and Mail | BILL HOWATT Special to The Globe and Mail

gratitude = counting your good fortune -- such as having good health, feeling safe, having loving family and friends --and your well-being.

Your mental health is influenced by what you focus on -- if you focus on the positive, most likely you’ll feel more positive, too. The "98-2 theory" : It’s common for a person to report that 98% of their day is going well and 2% is not. Oftentimes, as a result, 98% of their focus is on the 2% that’s not going so well. This can then cloud their perceptions, and instill a negative bias, as to how well their life is going right now. It can also affect their level of stress and sense of balance and calm..... take a few moments each day to reflect and acknowledge what you have to be grateful for. This reflection can be done inside your head or in writing. This is called “an attitude of gratitude.”

Practicing gratefulness

Here are some simple ways you can start to practice gratefulness.

Awareness

For seven days, take a few moments at the end of each day to reflect and acknowledge what you are grateful for and why. Consider all the people with whom you interacted and the ones you thanked and acknowledged.

Get a daily boost

Gratitude can fuel life satisfaction and contentment. Through daily reflection and practice, gratitude can become a positive boost. When practiced regularly it can provide a positive reserve to draw upon in those moments of life when you feel stressed and challenged.

Evaluate daily

Once a day is over, you can’t get it back. You can, though, enjoy the journey. Taking time each day to focus on what you are grateful for is a discipline that takes practice.
gratitude  mindsets  biases  affirmations  negativity_bias 
july 2016 by jerryking
Network orchestrators are the new path to profit - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 03, 2016 | Special to The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

The Network Imperative by authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck, and Jerry Wind.
Technology - Shift from physical to digital. Develop a digitally enabled platform around which people can congregate.

Assets - Shift from tangible to intangible assets. Physical assets are becoming a liability. Pay attention to your brand, a key intangible asset, and also view people as an asset, not an expense.

Strategy -move from operator to allocator. As a strategist, Mr. Libert has spent many years working with leaders to figure out what products to sell to what market. But these days, leaders should be active allocators of capital, like portfolio managers.

Leadership - The shift here is from commander – in charge of a highly structured, hierarchical, top-down organization – to co-creator, who knows how to motivate, inspire and work alongside others to develop the network.

Boards - His favourite shift, because it is the most difficult, is the switch from governance to representation.
Finally, the mindset must change to thinking less rigidly about roles, processes, products and industries.
networks  orchestration  Harvey_Schachter  platforms  Etsy  eBay  mindsets  flexibility  business_models  resource_allocation  intangibles  capital_allocation  atoms_&_bits  physical_assets  portfolio_management  assets  pay_attention 
july 2016 by jerryking
How The New York Times lost the internet, and how it plans to win it back - Vox
What's Page One? What's digital first?

The first page of the print edition of the newspaper is known as Page One with capital letters. The report details the extent to which Page One is the heart of the daily routine of the newsroom, with the most important editorial meeting also being called Page One, and reporters and editorial groups assessing themselves largely in terms of their ability to score Page One stories. This remains the case even though digital is not just the future of the New York Times but largely its present. The Times' digital audience dwarfs its print subscriber base, but the editorial workflow is built around Page One and the newspaper.

The report urges a "digital first" strategy and emphasizes that this means more than literally putting a story on the internet before it appears in a print newspaper. Digital first is a state of mind in which the job of the newsroom is to deliver an excellent digital product, which a relatively small team would then repackage as a daily print product. Today it's largely the reverse. Deadlines are structured around the pace of print, incentives are structured around Page One, and then teams of producers build a website out of what's really a print workflow.
newspapers  digital_media  digital_first  NYT  disruption  perspectives  mindsets  mobile_first  digital_strategies 
may 2016 by jerryking
A Burglar’s Guide to the City
Ways of thinking/looking at the built environment. Consider "security architecture".

Studying architecture the way a burglar would, Geoff Manaugh takes readers through walls, down elevator shafts, into panic rooms, and out across the rooftops of an unsuspecting city.

At the core of A Burglar’s Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight: how any building transforms when seen through the eyes of someone hoping to break into it.

Encompassing nearly 2,000 years of heists and break-ins, the book draws on the expertise of reformed bank robbers, FBI Special Agents, private security consultants, the L.A.P.D. Air Support Division, and architects past and present.

Whether picking locks or climbing the walls of high-rise apartments, finding gaps in a museum’s surveillance routine or discussing home invasions in ancient Rome, A Burglar's Guide to the City ensures readers will never enter a bank again without imagining how to loot the vault or walk down the street without planning the perfect getaway.
Achilles’_heel  architecture  books  counterintuitive  dark_side  fresh_eyes  heists  mindsets  security  security_consciousness 
april 2016 by jerryking
The Choices That Led Small Business Owners to Wealth - The New York Times
FEB. 12, 2016 | NYT | By PAUL SULLIVAN

have to make decisions to professionalize the business, put systems in place and have a plan that allows them to do longer-term planning. Those decisions can make the difference between being a small-business owner and a business executive with significant wealth....“There is no bright-line test when a company gets to a certain size or age to do these things,” said Kevin M. Harris, head of the family business group at Northern Trust. “It is based on where the company wants to go.”

Determining which decisions were the ones that made the difference is sometimes not an easy task, and the stories that are retold are often the ones that turned out well. Yet it is worth considering what can go wrong.

Entrepreneurs who failed to find success were often resistant to change
small_business  wealth_creation  decision_making  entrepreneur  risk-taking  mindsets  JCK  thinking_tragically  Northern_Trust  owners  private_banking  choices  internal_systems  professionalization  high_net_worth 
february 2016 by jerryking
The Republicans’ Incompetence Caucus - The New York Times
OCT. 13, 2015 | NYT | David Brooks.

The Republican Party’s capacity for effective self-governance degraded slowly, over the course of a long chain of rhetorical excesses, mental corruptions and philosophical betrayals. Basically, the party abandoned traditional conservatism for right-wing radicalism. Republicans came to see themselves as insurgents and revolutionaries, and every revolution tends toward anarchy and ends up devouring its own.
By traditional definitions, conservatism stands for intellectual humility, a belief in steady, incremental change, a preference for reform rather than revolution, a respect for hierarchy, precedence, balance and order, and a tone of voice that is prudent, measured and responsible. Conservatives of this disposition can be dull, but they know how to nurture and run institutions....Over the past 30 years, or at least since Rush Limbaugh came on the scene, the Republican rhetorical tone has grown ever more bombastic, hyperbolic and imbalanced....Politics is the process of making decisions amid diverse opinions. It involves conversation, calm deliberation, self-discipline, the capacity to listen to other points of view and balance valid but competing ideas and interests.

But this new Republican faction regards the messy business of politics as soiled and impure. Compromise is corruption. Inconvenient facts are ignored. Countrymen with different views are regarded as aliens. Political identity became a sort of ethnic identity, and any compromise was regarded as a blood betrayal.
David_Brooks  GOP  conservatism  political_polarization  partisan_warfare  Tea_Party  dysfunction  root_cause  Rush_Limbaugh  radicalization  mindsets  messiness  politics  compromise  rhetoric  listening  self-discipline  conversations  partisanship 
october 2015 by jerryking
When Big Data Isn’t an Option
May 19, 2014 / Summer 2014 / Strategy + Business | by David Meer
When Big Data Isn’t an Option
Companies that only have access to “little data” can still use that information to improve their business.

Many companies—probably most—work in relatively sparse data environments, without access to the abundant information needed for advanced analytics and data mining. For instance, point-of-sale register data is not standard in emerging markets. In most B2B industries, companies have access to their own sales and shipment data but have little visibility into overall market volumes or what their competitors are selling. Highly specialized or concentrated markets, such as parts suppliers to automakers, have only a handful of potential customers. These companies have to be content with what might be called little data—readily available information that companies can use to generate insights, even if it is sparse or of uneven quality....the beverage manufacturer developed an algorithm based on observable characteristics, then asked its sales professionals to classify all the bars and restaurants in their territories based on the algorithm. (This is a classic little data technique: filling in the data gaps internally.)

. Little data techniques, therefore, can include just about any method that gives a company more insight into its customers without breaking the bank. As the examples above illustrate, mining little data doesn’t mean investing in expensive data acquisition, hardware, software, or technology infrastructure. Rather, companies need three things:

• The commitment to become more fact-based in their decision making.

• The willingness to learn by doing.

• A bit of creativity. ...

The bottom line: Companies have to put in the extra effort required to capture and interpret data that is already being generated.
small_data  data  analytics  data_driven  market_segmentation  observations  call_centres  insights  data_quality  data_capture  interpretation  point-of-sale  mindsets  creativity 
september 2015 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
In the age of disruptive innovation, adaptability is what matters most - The Globe and Mail
May. 13 2015 | The Globe and Mail |by EAMONN PERCY.

William Gibson, who coined the term Cyberspace, “The future is here, it’s just not evenly distributed yet.”

It is not the innovation itself that matters, but its implications during this transition. For the individual, the key will be how to take advantage of these changes, while protecting one’s family, business, career, investments and way of life.....In 2013, a study authored by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McFee at the MIT Sloan School of Management argued that advances in technology are largely behind the sluggish job growth and flattening median incomes over the last 10 to 15 years. They believe that the recent rapid advances in technology are destroying jobs more quickly than they are being created, contributing to the recent stagnation in income and the growth of inequality in the U.S. ... However, around the year 2000, this correlation diverged, with productivity continuing to rise but employment levels stagnating. They call the gap between increasing productivity and employment ‘the Great Decoupling,’ and the authors believe technology is behind it....the best way to both survive and then thrive in this coming transition is simple; embrace it as an Age of Adaptability. There is nothing an individual can do to stop these massive global trends in technology, economics, and demographics, other than adapt. Even reacting to the trends is insufficient, since their scale and velocity are will leave you scrambling to catch up, not mind getting ahead. The only solution is to adapt by becoming a lifelong learner, failing fast if necessary, and learning to get ahead of the changes.

This ability to adapt starts with a mindset that the status quo is not a safe haven, but the place of greatest risk. It means accepting complete responsibility for your destiny, rather than subordinating your well-being to other groups or people. It requires you to take 100 per cent control of your circumstances, particularly if you are responsible for a family, or other people in the form of a business. It entails moving to a state of absolute clarity and awareness of the coming onslaught of change, and then taking a personal leadership role in making incremental, but permanent, changes to your life now.
mindsets  information_overload  disruption  the_Great_Decoupling  Erik_Brynjolfsson  MIT  Andrew_McFee  economic_stagnation  adaptability  innovation  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
Five things the TD Centre can teach us about how to build Toronto - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

The TD towers were a radical departure both in scale and in style. The tallest of the original two soared to 56 floors, dominating the skyline like nothing before or since. Rising from its six-acre site at King and Bay, it was everything the old buildings around it were not. While they featured arched windows and gargoyles, Greek columns and bronze roofs, the design of the TD Centre was all austerity and simplicity.

It is just this sort of future that the creators of the TD Centre had in mind when they hired one of the era’s most renowned architects to build them something outstanding. The architect was Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), the Chicago-based German émigré who liked to say that “less is more.” He referred to his works as “skin-and-bones” architecture, and his unadorned steel-and-glass boxes were meant to reflect the spirit of a modern technological era.

It took ambition and foresight to pull off something as bold as the TD Centre. It meant thinking about what the city would become instead of just coping with what it was. Those qualities sometimes seem lacking in today’s Toronto. There are still things we can learn from those dark towers.

First, don’t be afraid of tall buildings.
Second, investing in quality pays.
Third, maintain what you have.
Fourth, pay attention to details.
Finally, always think about the future. Toronto, and Canada, were in a risk-taking frame of mind when the first tower took shape. Expo 67, the wildly successful world’s fair, was under way in Montreal. The striking new Toronto City Hall by Finnish architect Viljo Revell had opened two years earlier.
'60s  ambitions  architecture  boldness  foresight  history  lessons_learned  Marcus_Gee  skyscrapers  Bay_Street  TD_Bank  Toronto  design  forward_looking  PATH  detail_oriented  minimalism  quality  Expo_67  risk-taking  mindsets  pay_attention 
may 2015 by jerryking
How to raise entrepreneurial children - The Globe and Mail
REVA SETH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 28 2015,

According to a 2013 joint report from the United Way and McMaster University almost half the residents of southern Ontario are engaged in ‘precarious employment’ or work in jobs that share some of the characteristics of precarious work. This increasingly applies to ‘white collar’ and knowledge professionals working freelance or on contract. And it’s a trend that’s set to continue.... deliberately fostering an entrepreneurial mindset one that our kids can then to apply to whatever it is they end up doing.

The good news is that according to research by entrepreneur, Stanford lecturer and author Amy Wilkinson, The Creators Code: The Six Essential Skills of Extraordinary Entrepreneurs, these are all behaviors that can be learned, practiced and passed on.

Ms. Wilkinon advises parents to encourage their children to ask “how” and “why” something works.
parenting  mindsets  entrepreneurship  howto  children  books 
april 2015 by jerryking
The three personal development goals successful people pursue habitually - The Globe and Mail
DIXIE GILLASPIE
Entrepreneur.com
Published Saturday, Jan. 24 2015
(1) They spend time getting to know themselves. They know their energy patterns, so they know how much sleep is optimal. They know when they get their best rest they are at their best when they are awake. They know what fuel their body needs, and what kind of exercise it takes to feel the way they want to feel. They know what environments they need to be creative and productive, and they know the difference between those two states.

They know their priorities, too, and they know that all of their decisions must start with the highest level of their vision, mission or purpose.
(2)They spend time improving themselves. Successful people know that to increase their net worth they must increase their personal worth. They’ve mastered the personal SWOTT analysis and they consistently invest in themselves....Successful people read-story books, how-to books, news, industry articles. They read to improve their knowledge, their mind-set, even their mood. Moreover, successful people study--trends in their industry and outside of their industry, things that interest them and, most of all, they study people.
(3) They spend time sharing themselves. Many super successful people are generous with their money and time.
overachievers  self-analysis  self-assessment  personal_energy  self-awareness  generosity  mindsets  self-improvement  habits  think_threes  volunteering  serving_others  high-achieving 
january 2015 by jerryking
Where to Look for Insight
Mohanbir Sawhney Sanjay Khosla
FROM THE NOVEMBER 2014
Innovation isn’t a department. It’s a mindset that should permeate your entire enterprise.

No matter the venue, the feedstock for innovation is insight—an imaginative understanding of an internal or external opportunity that can be tapped to improve efficiency, generate revenue, or boost engagement. Insights can be about stakeholder needs, market dynamics, or even how your company works.

Here are Seven Insight Channels
Anomalies

Examine deviations from the norm
Do you see unexpectedly high or low revenue or share in a market or segment? Surprise performance from a business process or a company unit?

Confluence

Find macro trend intersections

What key economic, behavioral, technological, or demographic trends do you see? How are they combining to create opportunities?

Frustrations

Pinpoint deficiencies in the system

Where are customer pain points for your products, services, or solutions? Which organizational processes or practices annoy you and your colleagues?

Orthodoxies

Question conventional beliefs
Are there assumptions or beliefs in your industry that go unexamined? Toxic behaviors or procedures at your company that go unchallenged?

Extremities

Exploit deviance
What can you learn from the behaviors and needs of your leading-edge or laggard customers, employees, or suppliers?

Voyages

Learn from immersion elsewhere
How are your stakeholders’ needs influenced by their sociocultural context?

Analogies

Borrow from other industries or organizations
What successful innovations do you see applied in other disciplines? Can you adapt them for your own?
customer_insights  HBR  analogies  anomalies  toxic_behaviors  trends  pain_points  assumptions  innovation  insights  conventional_wisdom  travel  laggards  copycats  dilemmas  extremes  orthodoxy  immersive  deviance  learning_journeys  leading-edge  unexpected  mindsets  frictions  opportunities  opportunistic  consumer_behavior  feedstock 
november 2014 by jerryking
Five Steps to Lower the Risk of Breast Cancer - The Experts - WSJ
Sep 15, 2014 | WSJ | Marissa Weiss.

The top five breast-healthy steps are:

1) Get to and stick to a healthy weight
2) Exercise regularly: three-to four hours a week (five-to seven are even better)
3) Stop smoking
4) Follow a Mediterranean diet
5) Limit your alcohol to five or fewer drinks a week (3 or fewer is even better). Equivalent drinks relative to alcohol content are: 12 oz beer, 5 oz wine, 1.5 oz hard liquor

Also,
#1 of the five steps should be: know your family history, #2 should be talk to a professional genetic counselor about your risks, #3 should be eating a plant-heavy diet, and #4 should be regular exercise. Quite frankly, #5 should be to try to take a “mindful” approach to life which has been proven to have physical and mental health benefits.
cancers  exercise  fitness  mindsets  healthy_lifestyles  risk_factors 
september 2014 by jerryking
A hacker mindset for success, the accelerated way - FT.com
September 10, 2014 | FT | By Emma Jacobs.

Cedarbrae: Book Nonfiction In Library 650.1 SNO

Shane Snow’s book Smartcuts....too many of us are mired in dated ways of doing things, argues Snow. Traditional thinking goes something like this: if we pay our dues and take our time, we might earn great success. What Snow suggests instead is that we learn from people such as Groupon's Mr Mason, who “buck the norm and do incredible things in implausibly short amounts of time”.

Snow, a tech journalist in New York and co-founder of Contently, which provides content for brands, believes we all need a hacker mindset to become successful. He is not advocating criminality or even the skills of a coder but suggests applying lateral thinking to careers and business problems. Rather than shortcuts, he advocates ethical “smartcuts”, hence the book’s title. Classic success advice, he writes, is “work 100 hours a week, believe you can do it, visualise, and push yourself harder than everyone else. Claw that nail out with your bare hands ‘til they bleed if necessary”. He dismisses this as “the hard way”.
He argues, for example, that mentors do not work because they are stiff and formulaic.
hackers  books  career_paths  disruption  attitudes  lateral_thinking  thinking  hacks  mindsets  shortcuts  speed 
september 2014 by jerryking
Five ways training for a marathon inspired me as an entrepreneur - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SCHNURMAN
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Jul. 29 2014

1. Keep your commitment. In business, you can’t let difficult challenges prevent you from following through with a plan.

What get one through these hard times is the commitment you make and a strong belief in wanting to break it.

2. Have a clear goal and strong plan. Many entrepreneurs grow their businesses by using their gut and intuition. When you hit adversity, not having a plan isn’t always the smartest choice.

A great thing about the marathon is that there is a clear goal of 26.2 miles and a proven training schedule. Since I didn’t have to put any additional thought into the goal or plan, I was able to focus all my energy on being mentally tough enough to keep up with the 30+ mile weeks and any life challenges that got in the way.

It made me realize the stronger my convictions are in my business goals and in my plan to get there, the more mentally tough I will become.

3. Go in with the right mindset. As business owners, we focus on outside challenges such as raising money, managing a team or acquiring new customers. While all of these issues are important and need to be addressed, they do not hold a candle to the internal challenges that we face on a daily basis: stress, self doubt, negativity, loss of focus, blaming others, fear of failure, etc.

If you have the right mindset and a positive attitude, no outside force can stop you in your journey to success. When training for the marathon, I turned to inspirational speeches and videos that I could listen to while I ran. Without these videos playing in a loop, it would have been hard for me to get through some of the tougher moments. You should apply the same type of inspirational experience sharing to business. It allows you to take the 10,000 foot-view and work on the business instead of in it.

4. Run through the wall. In business, we come up against walls all the time. They key is having the right partner or mentor to help see you through it.

While training, I was told that after mile 20 the same thing happens in the marathon. It happened at mile 23 of my first marathon; I hit a wall. My feet were burning and my legs had shooting pains. All the signals in my body were telling me to stop running. But I was lucky enough to have a more experienced running partner who kept pushing me the additional 30 minutes. He motivated me and kept my focus on the finish line instead of the pain.

In business, we all can benefit from other people’s expertise to get through the pain and hit our big goals.

5. Experience new things. Too often in life we get caught up in a daily routine. Luckily, as entrepreneurs, it’s in our DNA to shake it up and learn new things. During training, I ran through almost every NYC neighborhood and found that I can develop a deep focus for hours on end. I read new books that inspired me, met new people and took part in over a dozen races.

I have transformed my mentality from someone who never ran further than 4 miles to a marathon runner. Now, the sky is the limit.
entrepreneur  gut_feelings  hard_times  intrinsically_motivated  lessons_learned  marathons  mindsets  owners  positive_thinking  running 
august 2014 by jerryking
What kind of jobs do the software engineers who earn $500k per year do? - Quora
If you're a worker in a village who supplies said village with water, you are valuable to its people. There are two types of workers:

Type 1 worker: Grabs an empty bucket or two, goes to the sweet water lake, fills them up, comes back and makes twenty people happy. He gets to drink some of that water along the way, and once he gets back, takes some of the water home.

Type 2 worker: Disregards how much of a "fair share" of water he's getting. Instead of grabbing a bucket, grabs a shovel and a little cup, and disappears for a while. He's digging a stream from the lake towards the village. Often he disappoints people for having returned from weeks of work with an empty cup. But the elders in the village for some reason believe in him and want to keep him (and throw him a bone so that he doesn't starve for a little while). Some day, suddenly he shows up with a constantly flowing stream of water behind his back. He puts the Type 1 workers out of water delivery business. They'll have to go find a different activity and "team" to work with. Type 2 worker, depending on how much control they retained on that stream, get to own a good chunk of it. Because the village wants to acquire and integrate that stream, they compensate the ownership of Type 2 worker in that stream with on par ownership in the village itself, typically land or such.

News media observes the Type 2 worker and his unwillingness to part with his accumulated wealth in return for his added value for the village (often vesting on a schedule, also known as golden handcuffs); and spins it such that it looks as if another village tried to woo that worker but was met with unexpected resistance.

The resulting media impression, in the mind of Type 1 workers, feels like pay inequity (see the video at the bottom). This is because Type 1 workers expect equal rewards for equal time spent being loyal to the same village.
productivity  software  Quora  mindsets  value_creation  entrepreneurship  creating_valuable_content  uncharted_problems  unconventional_thinking  solutions  wealth_creation  variations  productivity_payoffs  scaling  thinking_big 
may 2014 by jerryking
Accessing Open Data via APIs: Never Mind the App, Is There a Market for That?
Mark Boyd, September 4th, 2013

But is the market ready to monetize? In Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, authors Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier argue that at present, those with “the most value in the big data value chain” are those businesses and entrepreneurs with an innovative mindset attuned to the potential of big and open data. While still in its nascence, “the ideas and the skills seem to hold the greatest worth”, they say. However, they expect:

“…eventually most value will be in the data itself. This is because we’ll be able to do more with the information, and also because the data holders will better appreciate the potential value of the asset they possess. As a result, they’ll probably hold it more tightly than ever, and charge outsiders a high price for access.”
data_scientists  open_data  massive_data_sets  entrepreneurship  start_ups  InfoChimps  Junar  mindsets  commercialization  monetization 
january 2014 by jerryking
The need for an analytical approach to life
November 3, 2013 | FT.com | By Rebecca Knight.

Risk analysis is not about predicting events; it’s about understanding the probability of possible scenarios, according to Elisabeth Paté-Cornell, professor at the Stanford School of Engineering.
In her latest research, she argues that expressions such as “black swan” and “perfect storm”, which have become journalistic shorthand when describing catastrophes, are just excuses for poor planning. Managers, should “think like engineers” and take a systematic approach to risk analysis. They should figure out how a system works and then identify the probable ways in which it could fail.
So does a black swan event exist?
The only one that I can think of is the Aids epidemic. In the case of a true black swan, you cannot anticipate it.
And what about ‘perfect storms’?
A combination of rare events is often referred to as a perfect storm. I think people underestimate the probability of them because they wrongly assume that the elements of a perfect storm are independent. If something happened in the past – even though it may not have happened at the same time as something else – it is likely to happen again in the future.
Why should managers take an engineering approach to analysing the probability of perfect storms?
Engineering risk analysts think in terms of systems – their functional components and their dependencies. If you’re in charge of risk management for your business, you need to see the interdependencies of any of the risks you’re managing: how the markets that you operate in are interrelated, for example.
You also need imagination. Several bad things can happen at once. Some of these are human errors and once you make a mistake, others are more likely to happen. This is because of the sequence of human error. When something bad happens or you make a mistake, you get distracted which means you’re more likely to make another mistake, which could lead to another bad event. When you make an error, stop and think. Anticipate and protect yourself.
How can you compute the likelihood of human error?
There are lots of ways to use systems analysis to calculate the probability of human error. Human errors are often rooted in the way an organisation is managed: either people are not skilled enough to do their jobs well; they do not have enough information; or they have the wrong incentives. If you’re paid for maximum production you’re going to take risks.
So in the case of a financial company I’d say monitor your traders, and maybe especially those that make a lot of money. There are a lot of ways you can make a lot of money: skill, luck, or through imprudent choices that sooner or later are going to catch up with you.
So you can do risk analysis even without reliable statistics?
We generally do a system-based risk analysis because we do not have reliable statistics. The goal is to look ahead and use the information we have to assess the chances that things might go wrong.
The upshot is that business schools ought to do a better job of teaching MBAs about probability.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
“Numbers make intangibles tangible,” said Jonah Lehrer, a journalist and
author of “How We Decide,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009). “They
give the illusion of control. [Add "sense of control" to tags]
engineering  sense_of_control  black_swan  warning_signs  9/11  HIV  Aids  business_schools  MBAs  attitudes  interconnections  interdependence  mindsets  Stanford  imagination  systems_thinking  anticipating  probabilities  pretense_of_knowledge  risk-management  thinking_tragically  complexity  catastrophes  shorthand  incentives  quantified_self  multiple_stressors  compounded  human_errors  risks  risk-analysis  synchronicity  cumulative  self-protection  systematic_approaches 
november 2013 by jerryking
African Guyanese leaders must be much more development oriented
November 20, 2007 | Stabroek News | by Lin-Jay Harry-Voglezon.

Cheddi Jagan said around 1990, that the PNC government was preparing the Afro community to fail. He meant the high concentration of Afro Guyanese in the bloated public service sector which was unsustainable, and the practice of giving them opportunities on the basis of party cards, as a way of up-keeping the government, would backfire on the community. He meant that when the system of things changed the community would be uncompetitive for it would by then have nurtured the wrong ethics, expectations, and attitudes. The psyche of dependency on the state would be so ingrained that it would fail to be as resourceful as it is ought to be and was capable of being........I have argued in the past that the Afro community, owing to its historical conditions of survival, had crystallised a false sense of importance and security under PNC governance. I indicated that it is not a government of black faces, PNC or otherwise that would transform the Afro communities, but transformation in cultural ideas and economic groundings, which could be induced through changed conditions of survival and an improved understanding of self. Of all Afro leaders, Walter Rodney was best trained and equipped to lead that transformation. His death was a tremendous loss.

This additional response to Osafo Modibo’s letters is that the problems at Buxton are fundamentally symptomatic of cultural and economic deficiencies. While Modibo accuses myself and others of being silent on the extremities in that village he fails to acknowledge that the very executors of the excesses are mainly Afro Guyanese. The Afro community should realise that the highest form of emancipation would be when every black child grows up with the doctrine that he must be black, honourable and economically creative. So whether he is poor, rich, or an officer of state he must never pawn his common sense and dignity to others.
letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Afro-Guyanese  ethnic_communities  entrepreneurship  false_sense_of_security  mindsets  generational_wealth  public_sector  psyche_of_dependency  human_psyche  Cheddi_Jagan  cultural_values 
september 2013 by jerryking
African-Guyanese need to invest time and resources in agriculture
May 19, 2011 | Stabroek News | by Richard Drake.

I believe that what black communities lack the most is money and wealth. A causal observation of any black community will reveal that the stranglehold of poverty is affecting their growth and development. The high number of dilapidated buildings, poor roads, water and sanitation are manifest expressions of that poverty. There are a number of reasons for this I shall discuss two.

First, our attitude towards money is bad. Look at the way we spend our hard-earned money in entertainment. Almost every show at the Providence Stadium is filled to capacity with young and not so young African-Guyanese. Every show young Blacks spend thousands of dollars they can hardly afford. We entertain ourselves at the expense of everything else, even our development.

Second, a large percentage of African-Guyanese work in the public sector; they are public servants. The government controls the public purse. Therefore, it decides how much these servants will be paid and how much they should be taxed. In this way, they do exert a great deal of power over the development of Blacks and influence the quality of their lives and communities.

One can argue that there are trade unions which negotiate with government, wages and salaries for workers. However, given the behaviour of the unions demonstrated at the last May Day rally, the divisions among them, and the fact that some of their leaders appear to have been bought out by the government one can hardly expect a decent challenge by these organizations to the unfairness in the national pay system.

As a result, the average public servant lives from pay cheque to pay cheque. It is a vicious cycle.

What is clear is that African-Guyanese desperately need a paradigm shift. African-Guyanese must get out of the public sector now. We need to begin to ‘re-image’ ourselves not as servants (public or otherwise) but as entrepreneurs. This is absolutely necessary for wealth creation and development.

One area that is immediately available to us is agriculture. There is a lot of history in the black community in this industry and much aversion to it, particularly by our young people but, there is enormous potential in this industry. Export markets are available for all kinds of non-traditional produce. However, we are too busy sitting behind desks burdened with loads of paperwork that we cannot see and exploit the potential in this sector. We love the sound of the names and status of certain positions in the public sector. Some of those very positions retard our growth and progress. We have to change that.

As a people, we need to invest time and resources in the agriculture industry; we need to go back to the land en masse. Black families and communities must become efficient economic units, generating wealth for real development through large-scale crop and animal husbandry. This will make us self employed, reduce the amount we spend in purchasing food, decrease our dependence on others to supply us with food and free up money for other investment activities. It will help in wealth generation in black communities.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  Afro-Guyanese  agriculture  wealth_creation  ethnic_communities  economic_development  entrepreneurship  mindsets  public_sector  overrepresentation  farming  fresh_produce  non-traditional  generational_wealth  self-employment  frugality  downward_spirals  poverty  public_servants  paradigm_shifts  African_Guyanese_villages  young_people  psyche_of_dependency 
august 2013 by jerryking
Jurgen Klinsmann Has U.S. Soccer Team Speaking German - WSJ.com
June 19, 2013 | WSJ | By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN.

When head coach Jurgen Klinsmann, the former German star, took over this band of oddly self-satisfied athletes two years ago, he promised to change the culture of U.S. soccer at the highest level. He aimed to build a side that played with both discipline and fury—one that could compete consistently with the best soccer nations. In other words, to turn them into... perhaps not Germany exactly, but something like it....Players talk constantly now about wearing out opponents rather than surviving them, of wanting to enforce their will on games and not simply being satisfied with that staple of American soccer from toddlerhood on—the trophy for participation. "Jurgen has instilled that mentality to fight for every ball, to play your role, to not take plays off," midfielder Graham Zusi said after Tuesday's win. "If we do that we can eventually grind a team down." In other words, what Germans do......"It is what is required to play well internationally. You got to play fast. You got to play at a high tempo, you got to play both ways, get behind the ball and be going forward. If you're going to be with the best in the world, this is what you got to do."

He has conveyed his message with the subtlety of a Wagnerian symphony. He belittled the accomplishments of his top players, booted team captain Carlos Bocanegra, even temporarily dropped Jozy Altidore, the team's top striker, all in an effort to teach these big fish in the smallish pond of U.S. soccer they need to burn to get better. His message, that international soccer is no joke, seems to be sinking in.
soccer  German  coaching  organizational_culture  team  hustle  operational_tempo  attitudes  grit  mindsets  fingerspitzengefühl  tempo  momentum 
june 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Difference Between The Mindsets Of Founders And Professional Managers - Forbes
Eric Jackson, Contributor

I cover the business of technology
Follow (1,079)
Investing
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3/26/2013
entrepreneur  start_ups  attitudes  mindsets  founders 
march 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  capital_accumulation  capital_formation  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_empowerment  economic_nationalism  ethnic_communities  judges  mindsets  self-reliance  self-determination  strategic_thinking  tribes  trustworthiness 
january 2013 by jerryking
Growing at a Smart Pace
Growing at a Smart Pace

What Every CEO Should Know About Creating New Businesses
1 Ultimately, growth means starting new businesses.
Most firms have no alternative. Sectors decline, as they did for Pullman’s railroad cars and Singer’s sewing machines. Technology renders products and services obsolete—the fate Polaroid suffered, as digital cameras decimated its instant photography franchise. Markets saturate, as Home Depot is now finding, after establishing more than a thousand stores nationwide.
2 Most new businesses fail.
3 Corporate culture is the biggest deterrent to business creation.
New ventures flourish best in open, exploratory environments, but most large corporations are geared toward mature businesses and efficient, predictable operations.
4 Separate organizations don’t work—or at least not for long.
5 Starting a new business is essentially an experiment.
6. New businesses proceed through distinct stages, each requiring a different
7. New business creation takes time--a lot of time.
8. New businesses need help fitting in--"bridging"--with established systems and structures.
9. The best predictors of success are market knowledge and demand-driven products and services.
10. An open mind is hard to find.
growth  Thomas_Stewart  HBR  CEOs  Junior_Achievement  hard_to_find  start_ups  failure  organizational_culture  experimentation  trial_&_error  life_cycle  tacit_data  entrepreneurship  dedication  obsolescence  demand-driven  infrastructure  new_businesses  bridging  large_companies  customer-driven  market_saturation  Home_Depot  Fortune_500  mindsets  open_mind  decline  Michael_McDerment  Polaroid  digital_cameras 
december 2012 by jerryking
Conservatism is about more than cutting taxes
September 27, 2004 | G&M | by William Thorsell.

A conservative frame of mind starts with respect for the depth of our social experience, for our history and inheritance as a civilization, if you will. It values the successful adaptations of previous generations, and is slow to throw over well grounded, much-tested means of securing social order and economic prosperity.

A conservative frame of mind is suspicious of complete answers, total solutions and centralized controls. it is humble with the memory of history's honors and excesses. It remembers, as well as dreams. It looks askance at the fragility of humanity, the distortions of power, and the enthusiasms of any given moment.

It puts more faith in process than specific outcomes - the rule of law — and expresses more faith in aspirations than prescriptions.

It recognizes free markets as a fundamental expression of democracy, and values their power to generate technological change and productive work. it is fierce in its respect for individual human rights against aggression by any group, even for admirable ends.

A particular level of taxation is not seminal to these conservative attitudes. The purposes and structure of taxation are.

A conservative may even support higher levels of taxation in the interest of prosperity and social health. Look what Brian Mulroney and, yes, Paul Martin finally did in raising taxes to slay Canada's deficit - which underlies so much of our current economic and social success.
Conservatives will happily invest public money on education, infrastructure, defence and social programs to perpetuate and strengthen the traditions of their society. These responsibilities come with the Constitution, after all. It is how they are done — efficientiy, carefuiiy and affordabiy - that matters.
Conservatives appreciate the limits of public programs to change human nature or solve existential problems. Conservatives know where levels of regulation and taxation become counterproductive, however laudable the political goals may be. So they stop there, often with a rueful smile.
conservatism  Conservative_Party  William_Thorsell  technological_change  Ontario  Michael_Harris  Dalton_McGuinty  taxation  mindsets  skepticism 
september 2012 by jerryking
A Mindset, Not a Technology | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Find Articles
Dec 15, 1999 | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Tony Silber.

But technology improvements only enable. They're a means, not the end. The real commitment has to be a companywide understanding of how valuable a fully developed database marketing operation is--especially for magazine publishers, who, because of their lists, already have a rather sophisticated picture of their customers. Database marketing--data mining, data warehousing, one-to-one marketing, whatever you want to call it--is really a mindset, an approach, a framework for doing business. And it remains, to me at least, unclear how many publishing companies are really maximizing the inherent, but often latent, value of their databases. That's why we decided to do this issue.
data  data_driven  databases  marketing  frameworks  Condé_Nast  mindsets  latent  companywide 
july 2012 by jerryking
Who gets the money: 'aggressive, hungry and paranoid' - The Globe and Mail
MARK EVANS | Columnist profile
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Friday, Mar. 02, 2012

there is financing available for “aggressive, hungry and paranoid” entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The problem is that there aren’t enough of those kinds of entrepreneurs in Canada....“Venture capital is made for people who are very ambitious, people who want to make a dent in the world, eat someone’s lunch, and want to disrupt someone’s business. That attitude, we don’t have enough of in Canada.”
iNovia  venture_capital  vc  entrepreneur  change_agents  disruption  mindsets  paranoia  ambitions  Mark_Evans  aggressive  frugality  pitches  thinking_big  champions  competitiveness  self-confidence  overambitious  staying_hungry  torchbearers 
march 2012 by jerryking
Viola Davis on a Mind-Set That She Says Harms Black Actors - NYTimes.com
February 14, 2012, 8:30 am
Viola Davis on a Mind-Set That She Says Harms Black Actors
By MELENA RYZIK

“I want you to win,” Mr. Smiley said, “but I’m ambivalent about what you’re winning for.”

Ms. Davis was direct. “That very mind-set that you have and that a lot of African-Americans have is absolutely destroying the black artist,” she said.

“The black artist cannot live in a revisionist place,” she added. “The black artist can only tell the truth about humanity, and humanity is messy. People are messy. Caucasian actors know that.”
African-Americans  actors  films  movies  Tavis_Smiley  attitudes  mindsets 
february 2012 by jerryking
Why Should Anyone be Led by You
September-October 2000| HBR | by Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones
leadership  HBR  myths  tough_love  tough-mindedness  empathy  mindsets 
november 2011 by jerryking
Corner Office - The 5 Habits of Highly Effective C.E.O.’s
April 16, 2011|NYT|ADAM BRYANT
* Passionate Curiosity.
Share stories re. failures, doubts & mistakes. Ask big-picture
questions re. why things work the way they do & can they be improved
upon? Know people’s back stories, and what they do. Relentless
questioning can lead to spotting new opportunities, or helping
understand subordinates, and how to get them to work together
effectively.
* Battle-Hardened Confidence
The best predictor of behavior is past performance, & that’s why so
many CEOs interview job candidates about how they've dealt with failure.

* Team Smarts
* A Simple Mind-Set
Be concise, get to the point, make it simple. ...There was a time when
simply having certain information was a competitive advantage. Now, in
the Internet era, most people have easy access to the same information.
That puts a greater premium on the ability to synthesize, to connect
dots in new ways and to ask simple, smart questions that lead to
untapped opportunities.
* Fearlessness - Not status quo!
CEOs  leadership  teams  ksfs  contextual_intelligence  Managing_Your_Career  executive_management  curiosity  questions  mindsets  concision  confidence  critical_thinking  overlooked_opportunities  interpretation  connecting_the_dots  fearlessness  the_big_picture  subordinates 
april 2011 by jerryking
Tough-mindedness - Gabor's Positive Thoughts
William James, a great teacher of psychology & philosophy
at Harvard during the early yrs. of the 20th century, made the useful
distinction between being tough-minded vs. tender-minded. The terms have
nothing to do with levels of ethical conduct; the toughness referred to
is toughness of the intellectual apparatus, toughness of the spirit,
not toughness of the heart. It is the attitude & the qualities &
the training that enable one to seize on facts & make these facts a
basis for intelligent, courageous action. The tough-minded have a zest
for tackling hard problems. They dare to grapple with the unfamiliar
& wrest useful truth from stubborn new facts. They are not dismayed
by change. Above all, the tough-minded do not wall themselves in
comfortable illusions. They do not rely on the easy precepts of
tradition or on mere conformity to regulations. They know that the
answers are not in the book.
tough_love  tough-mindedness  attitudes  conformity  mindsets  decision_making  ambiguities  change  illusions  arduous 
april 2011 by jerryking
Want to Be More Successful? Change Your Mindset
January 24, 2011 | BNET | By Jeffrey Pfeffer. for most
people, networking, building social relationships with strangers at, for
instance, events and functions, was seen as a task. That mindset held
true for many of the other actions required to build power–they were
tasks. Tasks, he said, are things like taking out the garbage. You don’t
try to develop your “skill” at taking out the garbage, you don’t think
much about it, you just do it and get it over with.

However, if you think of networking as a skill, then that mindset
changes everything. Skills are things that can, and maybe even should,
be developed. You think about how well you are performing skills, you
work on getting better, you get feedback, you apply thought, you learn.
attitudes  lifehacks  skills  networking  mindsets 
march 2011 by jerryking
Working Wounded: Find Big-Time Success at Work - ABC News
Feb. 29, 2008 | ABC News | By BOB ROSNER. Dear Working
WOUNDED: I'm a decent salesperson, but no rainmaker. How do you become a
big-time salesperson? Answer: Rainmakers aren't witch doctors who
dance to make it rain. Rather, they're salespeople who see markets
overflowing where most of us see nothing but desert. Below, I've listed
three dos and one don't for making sales fall from the sky. For more,
check out Ford Harding's book, "Creating Rainmakers" (Wiley, 2006).
DO Listen and synthesize. - Mr. Average assumes his most important tool
to making a sale is his golden tongue. While Ms. Rainmaker knows that
it's her ears.
DO Make a friend, not a sale.
DO Always be on the lookout. - have your eye on the horizon for that
next big sale.
DON'T Be part of the pack - make opportunities. Find the
not-part-of-the-pack marketing strategy for your product or service.
rainmaking  sales  selling  tips  prospecting  listening  rainmakers  differentiation  mindsets  books  packaging 
december 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - Leading With Two Minds - NYTimes.com
May 6, 2010 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS. Five years
ago, the United States Army was one sort of organization, with a certain
mentality. Today, it is a different organization, with a different
mentality. It has been transformed in the virtual flash of an eye, and
the story of that transformation is fascinating for anybody interested
in the flow of ideas.

The process was led by these dual-consciousness people — those who could
be practitioners one month and then academic observers of themselves
the next.

It’s a wonder that more institutions aren’t set up to encourage this
sort of alternating life. Business schools do it, but most institutions
are hindered by guild customs, by tenure rules and by the tyranny of
people who can only think in one way.
David_Brooks  U.S._military  organizational_change  institutional_change  dual-consciousness  institutions  critical_thinking  strategic_thinking  U.S._Army  introspection  self-analysis  self-awareness  transformational  mindsets  idea_flows 
may 2010 by jerryking
Unleashing your inner supernova
Dec 29, 2006 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.8 | by Diane Davies.
Go beyond being a good and find out how to become indispensable. The
indispensable person is focused on success, and has built a reputation
not only for finding solutions, but for having visionary ideas and the
guts to make them reality. Here are four steps for building that
indispensable presence. (1) Own the company. Start thinking like the
company's owner. (2) Develop your presence. Avoid negativity. digest
information quickly and present it clearly and concisely. (3) Build
your reputation with colleagues, other parts of the company, members of
professional associations and the broader community. Be the "go-to"
person. Prepare. (4) Be visionary. Plus: Blowing your own horn
(softly). For Jason Isaacs.
indispensable  owners  up-and-comers  Managing_Your_Career  solutions  solution-finders  personal_branding  reputation  self-promotion  time-management  movingonup  visionaries  mindsets  Pablo_Picasso  negativity_bias  clarity  concision  Jason_Isaacs 
february 2010 by jerryking
Changing Mind-Sets About School, and Hygiene
January 11, 2010 | New York Times | By JENNIFER 8. LEE.
"Decoding the job title: It means that I do a lot of content and design
of school leadership stuff to develop the principals, the assistant
principals and the aspiring principals across the city. The office is
relatively new, in general. It was only created in 2007.

Before that? Achievement First Bushwick Middle School — I was the dean
of the students. I was basically the person in charge of culture,
discipline, student investment, student incentives, parent groups. The
whole theme of the school, as at all Achievement First schools, is to
strive to go to college. The fifth grade wasn’t known as the fifth
grade, it was known as the class of 2019, because that would be the year
that they would go to college."
leadership_development  teaching  education  role_models  schools  charter_schools  mindsets  policymaking 
january 2010 by jerryking
Shikha Dalmia: Dave Bing's Last-Second Shot - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 6, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHIKHA DALMIA.
"Our people [city workers] need to understand that entitlement is gone,"
Mr. Bing told the Detroit News in August. "There are people who think
we are job providers. We're service providers."
Dave_Bing  Detroit  urban  unions  public_sector  urban_decline  entitlements  mindsets 
november 2009 by jerryking
Pitching With Purpose
Published: April 1, 2008 |New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS

“Self-discipline is a form of freedom. Freedom from laziness and
lethargy, freedom from expectations and demands of others, freedom from
weakness and fear — and doubt.” You can’t simply urge someone to be
disciplined; you have to build a structure of behavior and attitude.
Behavior shapes thought. If a player disciplines his behavior, then he
will also discipline his mind. A pitcher’s mind is better balanced when
it is unceasingly aggressive.
David_Brooks  book_reviews  baseball  routines  self-discipline  mindsets  attitudes  life_skills  work_habits 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art! - NYTimes.com
February 12, 2009 NYT article By HOLLAND COTTER. The economic
downturn will force a new mindset on the art industry. Make art schools
interdisciplinary, complete with work terms in unorthodox locales (e.g.
prisons, hospitals, etc.). The 21st century will almost certainly see
consciousness-altering changes in digital access to knowledge and in the
shaping of visual culture. What will artists do with this?
artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  innovation  creativity  visual_culture  markets  rethinking  reinvention  fine_arts  interdisciplinary  unconventional_thinking  creative_renewal  21st._century  mindsets  unorthodox  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  workplaces 
february 2009 by jerryking
Can you spot a bad manager?
02-11-2008 column by Harvey Schachter relaying 10 ways that
serial entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan says she spots the incompetents.
If a manager displays any one of these behaviours, it should ring a
warning bell and more than two means you should sound the alarm.

(1) Bias against actions. There are always many reasons not to take a decision. Real leaders display a constant bias for action while the incompetents wait for more information, more options and more opinions.
(2) Secrecy.
(3) Oversensitivity.
(4) Love of procedure.
(5) Preference for weak candidates.
(6) Focus on small tasks.
(7) Allergy to deadlines.
(8) Inability to hire former employees/colleagues.
(9) Addiction to consultants.
(10) Long hours. Bad managers work long hours.
=====================================================
LEADERSHIP: WESTERN WORKPLACE CULTURE REWARDS COWBOYS

Rebels and gamblers prosper in Western society - if they're male. In the TalentSmart newsletter, Nick Tasler notes the firm's emotional intelligence studies measure impulsivity: People who tend to make quick decisions and pay less attention to the consequences of their actions - in Wild West parlance, they "shoot first and apologize later."
====================================================
MARKETING: HOW TO COUNTER THE RECESSION MINDSET

By the time a recession is declared, we're already deep into it, so now is the time to counter the recession mindset that may be gripping your customers. ...in downturns customers want answers not information; the familiar, not something new; universal truths; direction; substance, not style; a limited set of choices; and time until it passes. Focus on the features and benefits of your product that promote saving, are necessary, and offer value. Prepare to make deals, but in a way that retains the value of your product and service. Remember that overwhelmed people are not interested in more information but want structure and clear direction on where to put their limited resources. Provide reassurance and context by talking about your firm's longevity.
====================================================
Reconfirm appointments one business day in advance. If you can avoid a last-minute cancellation, you gain back time that would be wasted travelling and waiting.
====================================================
The ten most powerful two-letter words in the English vocabulary are: If it is to be, it is up to me.
====================================================
economic_downturn  Harvey_Schachter  howto  incompetence  It's_up_to_me  leadership  leading_indicators  longevity  managing_people  mindsets  overwhelmed  recessions  warning_signs 
january 2009 by jerryking

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