recentpopularlog in

jerryking : misunderstandings   9

Picking Your Workplace Battles - WSJ
By SUE SHELLENBARGER
Dec. 16, 2014

Many people avoid confrontations, says Dr. Shelley Reciniello, New York, an executive coach and psychologist. But simmering frustrations can come out in other ways, fostering passive-aggressive behavior such as slacking off or backstabbing...It’s important to weigh your ability to control your emotions during a confrontation and to manage any counterfire from your opponent....More than 4 out of 5 corporate employees have conflicts with other employees over priorities, misunderstandings, resources or personality differences...When picking a battle, it is important to be willing to offer a solution or work with others to find one....It’s better to avoid some kinds of battles altogether, such as disputes over someone’s personality or style,
Communicating_&_Connecting  conflicts  confrontations  conversations  emotional_mastery  Managing_Your_Career  managing_people  managing_up  misunderstandings  passive-aggressive  stressful  Sue_Shellenbarger  workplaces 
december 2014 by jerryking
Brands not just a new wrapper for institutions
Fall 2014 | Western Alumni Alumni Gazette   | by Paul Wells, BA'89.

Michael Ignatieff is an asset to the Harvard brand. Or rather, to the Kennedy School brand, because Ignatieff is returning to the John F. Kennedy School of Government, also known as the Harvard Kennedy School or even as HKS. In other words, Harvard today is a sort of a nested set of Russian dolls of identity. There’s Harvard on the outside, and various affiliated schools further in, with academics of greater or lesser star power in the middle.

And it’s all of those attributes together, that jumble of organizations and individuals, that informed audiences think about when they think about Harvard.....In 2012 Arthur Brisbane, the former public editor of the New York Times, noted he found himself at “an oddly disaggregated New York Times of hyper-engaged journalists building their own brands, and company content flung willy-nilly into the ether.” The Times, surely the strongest newspaper brand in the world, has watched while reporter-columnists like David Carr, Mark Bittman, Paul Krugman, David Brooks take their act at least partly on the road, through active Twitter accounts, books, TV and public speaking gigs. I’ve even had well-meaning readers tell me I’d do better to leave Maclean’s and hang out my own shingle. But that misunderstands the nature of the relationship: The umbrella organization strengthens the individual writer’s clout — and vice versa. Strong identities aren’t something to fear on a big team. They’re essential to the team’s success
Paul_Wells  Colleges_&_Universities  Harvard  brands  branding  KSG  Michael_Ignatieff  personal_branding  NYT  symbiosis  relationships  unidirectional  bidirectional  misunderstandings  star_power  columnists  identity  matryoshka_dolls  writers 
september 2014 by jerryking
Three Mistakes to Avoid When Networking
February 18, 2014 | HBR | by Dorie Clark |

Misunderstanding the pecking order.
Asking to receive before you give.
Failing to specifically state your value proposition.
networking  serving_others  HBR  value_propositions  misunderstandings 
february 2014 by jerryking
Analytic Thinking and Presentation for Intelligence Producers.
The importance of a title
How to gist your reading (actually a very helpful section)
The need for focus and clarity
“If you can’t summarize your bottom line in one sentence, you haven’t done your analysis.”
One idea – One Paragraph
The inverted Pyramid writing style, i.e. begin with the core assumption.
The importance of precise language (no jargon, no abbreviations, allow no possible misunderstandings)
Again, there is nothing earth shattering, but it is an interesting read.
DEVELOPING ANALYTICAL OBJECTIVITY
The part that I found most interesting is the section entitled “Developing Analytical Objectivity.”
In a world filled with talk radio and infotainment, it is an important point to raise awareness about.
We have talked extensively about the cognitive nature of our brains and some of the fallacies and tricks our brains play on us – especially in the political arena.
This warning given to some of our country’s brightest thinkers acts as a reminder that if the smartest person in the room must protect against biases, so must we.
focus  clarity  strategic_thinking  critical_thinking  security_&_intelligence  writing  presentations  howto  sense-making  objectivity  biases  Philip_Mudd  analysts  misunderstandings  intelligence_analysts 
october 2012 by jerryking
Reflections on Relationship
November 1999 | Essence | Susan L Taylor.

no one can take your peace or power unless you surrender it. No one's bad behavior makes you miserable for long unless you allow it to. It's not our lover’s bad behavior that makes us crazy, but how we internalize and respond to it....The naive misunderstanding is that our partners must behave as we want them to for us to be happy, when our happiness is a measure of our own inner state.
relationships  dating  affirmations  Susan_Taylor  emotional_mastery  misunderstandings  happiness  intrinsically_motivated  inner-directed 
september 2012 by jerryking
A conversation that translates
June 7, 2012 | The Financial Times pg. 14 | Philip Delves Broughton.
(Pass on to Abdoulaye DIOP)
For global companies, creating an approach to risk that resonates across cultures can be a challenge, writes Philip Delves Broughton

Risk is a risky word. Already prone to misinterpretation among people who share a language and a culture, the difficulties multiply dangerously when it moves across borders.

What a Wall Street trader might define as moderately risky may seem downright insane to a Japanese retail broker; what an oil pipeline engineer in Brazil might characterise as gung-ho may appear overcautious to his revenue-chasing chief executive in London....The greatest pitfalls in managing risk across borders, he says, emerge from assuming too much. When dealing with fellow English speakers, it is easy to imagine that a shared language means shared assumptions - that the English, Americans and Australians think the same thing because they are using the same words.... Tips for managing risk across borders

Context is more important than language. Understand what matters most in the markets where you are doing business. Is it the law, logic or maintaining relationships?

Every word comes with its own "metadata" in different cultures. Be as specific as you can and never assume you have been properly understood without checking for potential misunderstandings.
cultural_assumptions  risks  risk-management  Communicating_&_Connecting  globalization  organizational_culture  transactions  national_identity  Philip_Delves_Broughton  translations  assumptions  misinterpretations  contextual  metadata  specificity  crossborder  cross-cultural  misunderstandings  interpretation  conversations  risk-assessment  words  compounded  risk-perception  multiplicative 
september 2012 by jerryking
China debates its brashness
Aug. 19, 2010 | Globe & Mail | Frank Ching. "In another
sign of Chinese assertiveness, Song Xiaojun, a Chinese military
commentator with China Central TV, said Beijing is ready to take over as
the “world’s policeman” if Washington is no longer able to discharge
this role. Despite this outpouring of nationalistic sentiment, there
are moderate voices arguing that China should continue to keep a low
profile and not become arrogant."..."Ye Hailin, a researcher with the
Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, warned against arrogance in an
online article in the People’s Daily headlined “Narcissism poisons the
people.” The Chinese, he said, “are no longer modest. They talk about
Seoul and Tokyo with contempt, and even boast Beijing and Shanghai, the
two biggest Chinese cities, could soon match NYC and Paris.” The
problem, as Mr. Ye saw it, was that some Chinese can’t stand criticism.
He and other scholars raise a question: Is the world misunderstanding
China, or is China itself to blame?"
Frank_Chin  China  China_rising  PLA  Beijing  scholars  hubris  narcissism  assertiveness  misunderstandings  readiness 
august 2010 by jerryking
Hezbollah as 'a hot cell for innovation'Why our intentions 'don't just fail, they backfire'
Apr 19, 2009 | Toronto Star | Lynda Hurst.

we're still using anachronistic ideas to hold together a global order that no longer exists. A revolution is in progress where the unthinkable all too readily becomes the inevitable.

The result? More – and more dangerous – reversals of intent and outcome.

"What's happening today is that our intentions don't just fail, they backfire on us," says the Beijing-based geo-strategy analyst. "We deliver the opposite of what we intend because we so misunderstand the way the system now works."

The "war on terrorism" creates even more terrorists. The attempt to build a risk-proof financial system produces more risks than anyone is able to foresee. The bid to spread capitalism across the globe widens the chasm between rich and poor. The effort to contain nuclear proliferation leads to rogue states such as North Korea and Iran playing gimme-gimme games (or maybe not) with the final option.

Think Mikhail Gorbachev setting out only to reform the Soviet Union, but instead triggering its downfall, which in turn leads the U.S. to conclude its values have won the Cold War. Not so, Ramo says. Or George W. Bush reckoning he can inject democracy into Iraq and, presto, out comes peace: "Absurd in the extreme."

The new rules are
still being formed. They will be based on one central premise: countless
variations in the scheme of things will continue to occur at warp
speed, and adapting to them equally as quickly will be crucial. The
unpredictable demands of constant newness can immobilize institutions,
however, not just individuals. It can blind them to unsprung traps,
freeze once-honed navigation skills. The structure of the U.S. State
Department has barely changed since the end of World War II.

Governments can't prepare for everything in the future, but they can
build resilience into their systems. Real power will be the ability to
come back strong after an unexpected shock. That will mean persistently
assessing the big picture, not just its component pieces.
new_normal  uncertainty  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  geopolitics  unpredictability  resilience  21st._century  adaptability  managing_uncertainty  Hezbollah  unintended_consequences  unexpected  political_power  accelerated_lifecycles  U.S._State_Department  immobilize  paralyze  constant_change  revenge_effects  rogue_actors  unthinkable  misunderstandings  Cambrian_explosion  iterations  Octothorpe_Software  Mikhail_Gorbachev  the_big_picture  warp_speed  financial_system 
may 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read