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jerryking : motivations   42

Don’t Waste Your Time on Networking Events
SEPTEMBER 26, 2016 | HBR | Derek Coburn.

My definition of “networking” is any activity that increases the value of your network or the value you contribute to it. The best way to do this is to avoid traditional networking events almost entirely. There are more efficient and effective ways to spend your time. Here are three of my favorite strategies:

Hosting Your Own Events
Hosting your own get-togethers gives you almost complete control over the attendees, the setting, and the outcome. It’s a great way to add value for existing clients and connections, and can also be an opportunity to meet and develop relationships with prospective clients.

Most professionals struggle to find the right balance when allocating their time between client services and business development. But when done properly, you can accomplish both by hosting a great client appreciation event.

The primary goal when planning an event should be to choose an activity your existing clients will enjoy. If you and your best clients share similar passions, start there. Do any of them play poker, or enjoy attending musicals or sporting events? My favorite events to host are wine tastings.
business_development  Communicating_&_Connecting  HBR  motivations  overrated  relationships  weak_links  networking 
may 2019 by jerryking
Be a Potentiator - Mike Lipkin
April 25, 2019 | @ #CAIF2019 | Presentation and speech By Mike Lipkin.

1. Be Self-Savvy: Define your principles. Discern your impact. Play your role. Know what drives you. Know how you’re occurring to others. Know their expectations of you. Know thyself and thy relationship with others.
2. Develop Situational Sensibility: Get out there. Know the trends. Connect the dots. Context is decisive. Whoever understands their environment best wins. So expand your footprint. Study the data until it tells the truth. Anticipate the future by getting there first. Become your peers’ scout. Discover the new world for yourself and other will want to join you.
3. Make a Powerful Promise: Declare your purpose. Express your value proposition. Focus your execution. Know your personal mission. Know the unique benefit you give to others. Act accordingly. So my mission is to turn people into potentiators. My unique benefit is to excite people into remarkable action. I’m executing my promise through motivational messages like this one in any way I can. What are you doing?
4. Become Sublimely Skilled: Practice for real. Become the authority. Make it a pleasure. Whatever your level, be the best at that level. Learn from every experience. Communicate your knowledge with conviction. Light others up with your joie de vivre.
5. Build Robust Resilience: Interpret to win. Be prolific. Train like an athlete. We’re only as good as the stories that we tell ourselves. Make whatever happens meaningful. Do more things. Put the odds on your side. And train, train, train. Stamina is the rocket fuel of champions.
6. Grow Courageous Creativity: Unleash your imagination. Experiment like Edison. Talk, listen, learn. Dare to dream then declare your dream. Turn it into reality by trying something new. Fail fast until you fly high. Get in front of people and give them great conversation. Enrich their perspective while you expand yours.
7. Be Fanatically Faithworthy: Commit to your commitments. Come through in the crunch. Be the best you can be, every day. If you say it, do it. Make your word the one thing that others can always depend on. Become the go-to-person in a crisis. And, whatever happens, bring your A-Game every time. You can’t always be the best, but you can always be the best you can be that day.
8. Create Close Connections: Give First. Open yourself up. Become an insider. Generosity pays big dividends. Show what you can give them and others will show you the money. Get up, close and personal. Become integral to others’ wellbeing. If you build their trust, they will pay it forward all the way back to you.
9. Communicate Like a Champion: Say it like you mean it. Talk their language. Connect them to their purpose. How you say what you say is as important as what you say. Let your authenticity shine through but inject it with your passion. Be the reason why other people rediscover why they make a difference.
10. Cause Bold Breakthroughs: Own it. Celebrate the struggle. Finish like a professional. It’s not about the title. It’s about your skin in the game. It’s about taking on the responsibility for everyone else’s success, no matter what. You can’t always win, but you can always play to win. It’s meant to be hard. The pain is the price you pay to be a potentiator. Close strong and the force will be with you.
breakthroughs  CAIF  code_switching  commitments  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  execution  inspiration  It's_up_to_me  Mike_Lipkin  motivations  purpose  self-awareness  self-knowledge  self-made  serving_others  situational_awareness  skin_in_the_game  torchbearers  value_propositions 
april 2019 by jerryking
Productivity Isn’t About Time Management. It’s About Attention Management.
March 28, 2019| The New York Times | By Adam Grant.

The better option is attention management: Prioritize the people and projects that matter, and it won’t matter how long anything takes.

Attention management is the art of focusing on getting things done for the right reasons, in the right places and at the right moments........E.B. White once wrote: “I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve (or save) the world and a desire to enjoy (or savor) the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.” But in my research, I’ve found that productive people don’t agonize about which desire to pursue. They go after both simultaneously, gravitating toward projects that are personally interesting and socially meaningful........instead of focusing on how quickly I wanted to finish this article, I asked why I agreed to write it in the first place: I might learn something new when synthesizing the research; I’d finally have somewhere to point people when they ask about productivity; and it might help some of those people......productivity struggles are caused not by a lack of efficiency, but a lack of motivation. Productivity isn’t a virtue. It’s a means to an end. It’s only virtuous if the end is worthy. If productivity is your goal, you have to rely on willpower to push yourself to get a task done. If you pay attention to why you’re excited about the project and who will benefit from it, you’ll be naturally pulled into it by intrinsic motivation.

But how do I stay on task if I’m not worried about time?
Attention management also involves noticing where you get things done.....a series of studies led by Julia Lee (now at Michigan) show that bad weather is good for productivity because we’re less likely to be distracted by the thought of going outside....My favorite part of attention management is the when. Most of our productivity challenges are with tasks that we don’t want to do but that we need to do. ....there's something called attention residue: Your mind keeps wandering back to the interesting task, disrupting your focus on the boring task. ...if you’re trying to power through a boring task, do it after a moderately interesting one, and save your most exciting task as a reward for afterward. It’s not about time; it’s about timing.

Of makers and managers
If the goal is not just to be more productive — but also to be creative, then the stumbling block is that productivity and creativity demand opposite attention management strategies. Productivity is fueled by raising attentional filters to keep unrelated or distracting thoughts out. But creativity is fueled by lowering attentional filters to let those thoughts in.

How do you get the best of both worlds? In his book “When,” Dan Pink cites your circadian rhythm as help to schedule the right time to do your productive and creative work. If you’re a morning person, do your analytical work early when you’re at peak alertness; your routine tasks around lunchtime in your trough; and your creative work in the late afternoon or evening when you’re more likely to do nonlinear thinking. If you’re more of a night owl, you might be better off flipping creative projects to your fuzzy mornings and analytical tasks to your clearest-eyed late afternoon and evening moments. It’s not time management, because you might spend the same amount of time on the tasks even after you rearrange your schedule. It’s attention management: You’re noticing the order of tasks that works for you and adjusting accordingly
Adam_Grant  attention  attention_spans  circadian_rhythms  creativity  Dan_Pink  filtering  intrinsically_motivated  motivations  priorities  productivity  sequencing  time-management  timing  willpower 
march 2019 by jerryking
How I Avoid Confirmation Bias When Investing
Nov 8, 2017 | - The Experts - WSJ | By Ted Jenkin.

(1) Examine all evidence with equal rigor. If you have been sitting on cash during the stock market’s run this year or have been conservative with your investments choices, you may be feeling that you’ve missed out on big returns. And this could lead you to jump into some investments simply because you believe that the market highs will continue (and they have, after all), not because they are the right choice for your portfolio. I can remember a few years back when I thought I missed out on the 3-D printing run when those stocks were blazing.

You need to try to avoid such tendencies to accept confirming evidence without question by looking for real empirical data and evidence–and examining the evidence on both sides with equal rigor. For instance, consider whether the U.S. market is a better bet than international right now. Or, how the GOP tax plan will impact the markets. Make sure you ask yourself the tough questions.

In my case, I forced myself to first consider the downsides to investing in the emerging 3-D printing industry or what consolidation might happen along the way–and the effects it could have on the stocks I was considering. In the end, I took a pass.

(2) Get someone to play devil’s advocate. It has happened to the best of us, no matter our education or background in investing. You are at a dinner party or having a conversation in the kitchen at work when you hear someone say, “I just made 100% profit buying ABC stock, and this thing is just taking off.” When we hear of opportunities to make money, our interest is undoubtedly piqued. And if you hear a tip from a person you trust and like, chances are you will become convinced that it is, of course, a good idea.

Do yourself a favor and find someone you trust just as much to play devil’s advocate and argue the opposite. Ask the person to build a counter-argument using questions such as: What is the strongest reason to do something else? The second strongest reason? The third? What is the worst-case scenario? And can you live with it, if it happens? Then, consider this position with an open mind.

For me, it was a former boss. At times, I would grow frustrated with him because on the surface he would never agree with me when I presented an idea. Over the years, however, I realized it wasn’t really him challenging me as much as it was him challenging me to challenge my own thought process so I could be a better decision maker. His sage advice has made me a better investor today.

(3) Be honest with yourself about your motives. Have you ever heard the saying, “If you can see John Brown through John Brown’s eyes, you can sell John Brown what John Brown buys?” I think it applies to the way I’ve looked at investments in the past–and the motives behind my decisions. We often don’t realize the power of our own motives–and we aren’t honest with ourselves about what they are.

For instance, when I’ve made money in a stock in the past, I’ve felt that those gains justify holding onto to the stock for the long term–even if the stock isn’t performing as well as it once did. So now, when I start doing research about that stock’s prospects, I need to make sure that I am really gathering information to help figure me out the right time to sell the stock. This will help me to determine whether any long-held desire to keep an investment is rooted in sound financial reasoning or is just based on pride or another emotion.

(4) Don’t ask leading questions. One of the biggest mistakes you can make as an investor is to ask questions that set you up to get the answer you want–not the answer you need.....if you find that your financial adviser always agrees with your investment ideas, it may be time to find a different adviser. Healthy and heated debates with my adviser have allowed me to make better personal and business decisions over the years.
personal_finance  investing  confirmation_bias  questions  financial_advisors  worst-case  devil’s_advocates  biases  self-delusions  motivations  hard_questions  counter-arguments  red_teams  open_mind 
november 2017 by jerryking
Why China Hacks - WSJ
By L. GORDON CROVITZ
Updated July 17, 2016

This case suggests a shift in China’s hacking strategy. Beijing has gone from amassing huge amounts of communications to deploying the information for its own ends. Most notably, Mr. Dahlin’s case shows that Beijing has decided it is sometimes even worth disclosing sources and methods. By showing it has access to U.S. documents, Beijing sends the message to other reformers in China that they too can be called in any time and accused of “endangering national security.”
China  hackers  security_&_intelligence  espionage  motivations  cyber_security  data_breaches  endangered 
july 2016 by jerryking
Natural born chillers
November 14.15, 2015 |FT | by Sophie Knight. Telling people it's good for the environment isn't good enough. You have to give them a motivation to buy it, such as it being healthier or cheaper.
motivations  green  selling 
november 2015 by jerryking
Clay Christensen On What Your Business Can Learn From Divorce
April 12, 2013 | Fast Company | Business + Innovation | DRAKE BAER

Drake Baer was a contributing writer at Fast Company, where he covered work culture.

Bottom Line: In business, as in love, you must understand what the other person's needs are—whether they say it or not.
Clayton_Christensen  marriage  relationships  divorce  work_life_balance  motivations  takeaways 
february 2015 by jerryking
The Risks of Mission-Driven Companies–Part 1 - Risk & Compliance - WSJ
October 9, 2014 | WSJ | Gregory J. Millman is a senior columnist with Risk & Compliance Journal He is the author of The Vandals’ Crown: How Rebel Currency Traders Overthrew the World’s Central Banks, and several other books.
AMERICAN HALAL, BEN & JERRY'S, COCA COLA CO., GREENMONT CAPITAL PARTNERS, MARY'S GONE CRACKERS, MISSION-DRIVEN, ODWALLA, UNILEVER PLC

The fact that the founder and the investors in Mary’s Gone Crackers disagree about such fundamental issues as how to grow, the role of capital, and the motivations of investors exemplifies the risk and governance challenges that mission-driven companies can pose.

Acquirers also face risk when buying such businesses. “It’s extraordinarily difficult for a large company to take over a company with a specific brand consciousness that has to be operated on an arms- length basis from a marketing standpoint. Very few companies can manage to do that,” said Lewis Paine, senior vice president for consulting at marketing research firm GfK.

At ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s, acquired by Unilever PLC in 2000, “there have been a lot of bumps on the road,” said the unit’s chief executive, Jostein Solomon. An unusual sales contract, which we will discuss in more detail in the next article in this series, has helped keep the mission identity of the ice cream maker on track despite those bumps. Even so, said Brad Edmondson, author of the book Ice Cream Social: The Struggle for the Soul of Ben & Jerry’s, “It took Unilever a long time to really understand what it had agreed to, and there was a period of eight or nine years when Ben & Jerry’s and Unilever did not have a good working relationship.”

Adnan Durrani, founder of American Halal, said in a recent interview with Risk & Compliance Journal: “In a socially responsible business, the connection to the consumer is tied in with the brand value; one reason consumer packaged goods companies pay higher multiples for such businesses is that they want to grab those consumers. But once they do, they lose sight of the fact that there is authentic trust and transparency when the management team is close to that community.”

Business as usual may kill the goose that laid the golden egg.
books  Unilever  brands  privately_held_companies  Odwalla  mission_statements  Coca-Cola  motivations  values  large_companies  mission-driven  cultural_clash 
october 2014 by jerryking
Relax
1. Develop your own personal operating system. Carve out and define your own reality, philosophy, values, and interests rather than automatically accepting those of your family, peers, religion, or culture.

2. Begin to let go of the need for validation. Don’t be motivated by the opinions or others or the desire for recognition. Be driven by what is important to you and what you value.

3. Trust your instincts and allow for experimentation. Get to know yourself and discover what you enjoy and find exciting, even if you have to fail a few times.
4. Accept others as they are. Begin letting go of judgments and criticism of others. Focus on people’s strengths rather than their faults. Learn to deal with difficult people without diminishing yourself.

5. Really hear people. Go beyond just listening and understanding. Let people know that you really get them.

6. Take care of unresolved matters in your life. Restore your integrity. Forgive and ask for forgiveness where necessary. Reclaim the energy you have given to these matters.

7. Embrace a healthy lifestyle. Get some form of exercise daily. Eat healthy foods that support your body, not your emotions. Do this because you respect yourself, not to impress others.

8. Cause things to happen. Don’t wait for them. Be a creator, an instigator, a collaborator. Share your enthusiasm.

9. Show people you care. Don’t just talk about it. Show them in ways that are meaningful to them, not you.

10. Require the best of people. See them not only for who they are, but who they can be. Lovingly reflect that vision to them.

11. Ensure your own needs are met. Discern your primary needs, and communicate fully what is important and valuable to you in your relationships. Don’t compromise these to keep peace or hang on.

12. Speak constructively. Use your words to uplift, inspire, motivate, and encourage. Don’t offer “constructive criticism” or subtle digs.

13. Laugh easily. Have a lightness about you. Take life less seriously and choose to find and create fun and joy.

14. Cease gossip. Choose not to talk about others in ways that are openly or subtlety critical. Don’t share information for the feeling of power or intrigue.

15. Make requests, not complaints. If you need something from someone, ask for it directly. Don’t whine or complain to them or others.

16. Handle situations fully. Kindly but clearly deal with negative issues as soon as possible. Don’t tolerate anything if it causes resentments.

17. Be done with arguments. Smile and walk away until healthy communication is possible.

18. Offer help only when asked. Don’t assume that others want you to fix them or that you know best for them. Be available and give help only when asked.

19. Care deeply, but remain detached. Let others know you care deeply about them when they have problems, but don’t get caught up in their problems.

20. See with your heart, not your eyes. Look beyond superficiality when seeing someone. Financial status, appearance, notoriety, all mean nothing. Look for the authentic person inside.

21. Don’t say yes when you mean no. If you mean no, your yes will be harnessed with resentment. Say yes only when your yes is given freely.

22. Let others know you are grateful. Tell them and show them that you feel blessed to have them in your life.

23. Never play the guilt card. Don’t try to manipulate or hurt someone by trying to make them feel bad about their choices, decisions, or actions.

24. Give more than is expected. Don’t over-commit, but freely give more than you promise.

25. Be inter-developmental in your relationships. Don’t be controlling, dependent or co-dependent. Create relationships that are mutually uplifting, reward, and satisfying.

26. Be a big person. Don’t try to take credit, diminish others, or hold back on praise. Offer acknowledgment and power when it is needed and deserved.

27. Be confident enough to be humble. Be able to laugh at yourself, acknowledge your flaws and failures, and accept that they don’t define you.

28. Be open to learning. Don’t flaunt your intelligence or superior knowledge. Recognize that there is always something to learn, even from those who appear “less than.”

29. Be more engaged than engaging. Show your sincere interest in others. Use the word “you” more than “I.” Listen intently and reflect back to others who they are.

30. Give gifts that others want. Not just gifts to impress or that are important to you.

31. Challenge yourself constantly. Don’t settle for mediocre. Don’t languish in past accomplishments. Keep moving forward and exude enthusiasm about possibilities and the actions to make them happen.

32. Detach from adrenaline. Simplify your life enough so you are not rushed, stressed, cluttered, or distracted. Allow yourself time and room to focus.

33. Embrace the incredible power of now. Nothing is more valuable than this moment. Make it the best moment you possibly can right now.

34. Don’t fight the flow. Don’t struggle against people or situations you can’t control. Move effortlessly in a different direction.

35. Keep evolving. Stay on a path of self-improvement and stay alert for opportunities for shifts and growth.
motivations  inspiration  strengths  affirmations  personal_growth  self-improvement  immediacy  simplicity  focus  movingonup  gift_ideas  listening  continuous_learning  humility  praise  relationships  overdeliver  gratitude  sincerity  authenticity  self-awareness  constructive_criticism  foregiveness  values  self-starters  healthy_lifestyles  gossip  self-analysis  self-assessment  self-satisfaction  complacency  personal_energy  span_of_control  disconnecting  rainmaking  individual_initiative  beyond_one's_control  next_play  walking_away 
august 2014 by jerryking
Motivational speakers - great idea or waste of money?
Title:
By: Lawless, Jim, Training & Coaching Today, 17510805, May2008
Database:
Business Source Alumni Edition

HTML Full Text
Motivational speakers - great idea or waste of money?
Cont...
public_speaking  motivations 
november 2013 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  leading_indicators  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
Who Will Prosper in the New World - NYTimes.com
August 31, 2013 | NYT | By TYLER COWEN.
Who Will Prosper in the New World

Who will do well?

THE CONSCIENTIOUS
PEOPLE WHO LISTEN TO COMPUTERS
PEOPLE WITH A MARKETING TOUCH
MOTIVATORS
==================================================
Who will be most likely to suffer from this technological revolution?
PEOPLE WITH DELICATE FEELINGS
PEOPLE UNLUCKY IN HEALTH CARE
PEOPLE WHO DON’T NEED MONEY
POLITICAL RADICALS:
technology  economics  productivity  the_Great_Decoupling  career_paths  winner-take-all  automation  Tyler_Cowen  marketing  motivations  inequality  income_distribution  income_inequality  downward_mobility 
september 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
The art of powerful conversations - Stuart Knight
How do you make people feel?
People respond to people they like.
Mentor --> chance to mentor another function.
Learn something new
Meaningful to them.

Find out what you have in common
(1) New
(2) Memorable
(3) Relevant to them
(4) Meaningful
(5) Fun.

Part 2 questions: Ask why to get the true story on the table.
Be vulnerable--being authentic encourages other to be equally meaningful. Opens to door to powerful conversations. Telling people how you truly feel encourages others to meet you half-way.

Tip (1) Eye contact. Make the other person feel as though they are being heard.

A powerful conversation is not a conversation that doesn't lead to change.
A powerful conversation a day helps you.
A powerful conversation (1) helps you to discover something new about the individual, the real person.
(2) Allows the person to share something meaningful about their life.
(3) Find out what you have in common.
(4) Makes it memorable for that person.
(5) Makes you likable and fun.
conversations  Communicating_&_Connecting  motivations  questions  follow-up_questions  Stuart_Knight 
november 2012 by jerryking
New Year's Resolution 2002
1. Resolve to stay brutally optimistic.
2. Resolve to identify the most powerful benefit you offer to the people around you and then deliver it. (See below)
3. Resolve to pump up your personal vitality. How do I retain personal vitality?
[Personal vitality measures overall health in four key areas:
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Purpose – INTERESTING! (I believe that having a sense of individual life purpose is absolutely fundamental to personal happiness and contentment ]
4. Resolve to be habitually generous.
5. Resolve to go on a mental diet.
6. Resolve to be a global citizen, fully open to the cultures and influences of others.
7. Resolve to take control of your destiny.
8. Resolve to increase your human connectedness. Network.
9. Resolve to increase your creativity by letting go of the familiar. If innovation is everything, how do I institutionalize it in my personal life? Innovation ==> change strategy ==> succeed because they are subversive. Be a heretic!!!
10. Resolve to be you because others are already taken.

Practice adding value to things--ideas to make things worth more.
Practice adding value to people--what can I do to help my colleagues become more effective?
Practice adding value to myself--what can I do to make myself more valuable today?
heretical  inspiration  motivations  fitness  indispensable  serving_others  value_creation  resolutions  unconventional_thinking  JCK  affirmations  optimism  authenticity  generosity  Communicating_&_Connecting  subversion  purpose  networking  creative_renewal  personal_energy 
august 2012 by jerryking
Business For A Plan
October 2006 | Advisor's Edge Report | by Heidi Staseon. "He
reached an epiphany when his own family required specific
estate-planning expertise. McCullough was trying to help his father, a
reasonably affluent real estate entrepreneur, put his estate in order
but he couldn’t find the appropriate services within his firm or
elsewhere. “Nobody had put it in context for me, so I thought, if I’m
like this, there must be lots of other people who need to get some
direction and perspective on their situations.”
Northwood  family_office  Tom_McCullough  motivations 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Upside of Useless Stuff
April 25, 2011 | danariely.com | by Dan Ariely
"Let’s be clear. I don’t mean to say that marketing will save our
economy. Or that marketing things we don’t need is the key to a
prosperous planet. The line is narrow, indeed, between being motivated
to work and mortgaging the future (both your own and society’s) to get
stuff like bottled air.

Still, as we continue to redefine capitalism, let’s not discount the
role of aspiration and the desire for incremental luxuries–things we
want but don’t necessarily need. They can fuel productivity and thus
have a valuable function in our economy."
blogs  Dan_Ariely  motivations  behavioural  aspirations 
september 2011 by jerryking
Document Page: Social Science Palooza II
Brooks, David
The New York Times
03-18-2011

brooks.blogs.nytimes.com
David_Brooks  teams  motivations  employee_engagement  sports 
march 2011 by jerryking
Agency Leadership Advice: Branding Strategy Insider
Shelly Lazarus, Chairman & CEO, Ogilvy & Mather
Worldwide. Excerpted from her January 2005 article The Best Advice I
Ever Got in the HBR. David Ogilvy 's advice, "No matter how much time
you spend thinking about, worrying about, focusing on, questioning the
value of, and evaluating people, it won’t be enough, he said. People are
the only thing that matters, and the only thing you should think about,
because when that part is right, everything else works."...."the truth
is that clients come and go: You’ll always win another one, and another
will go away. The real problem came when people within a company became
dispirited and demotivated, engulfed by crisis, felt differently about
the work they were doing, and were ready to walk away in a huff, wanting
nothing more to do with it. The challenge, therefore, is not simply to
win back a big account. It was to motivate the people to forget about
the catastrophe and focus on the work"
advice  advertising_agencies  advertising  bouncing_back  CEOs  David_Ogilvy  demotivated  dispirited  enterprise_clients  Managing_Your_Career  motivations  Ogilvy_&_Mather  people_skills  resilience  Shelly_Lazarus  walking_away  win_backs  women 
december 2010 by jerryking
Why We Can't 'Motivate' Engagement
August 17, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Dov Seidman. Managers
who think of employee engagement as a goal rather than a way of working
have it all wrong!
employee_engagement  Daniel_Pink  motivations 
august 2010 by jerryking
Jobs: Passion—or a Steady Paycheck? - BusinessWeek
August 5, 2010,- BusinessWeekBy John Seely Brown
More people are leaving behind uninspiring careers and trying to earn a
living from work they love. The government can help them reinvent
themselves
career_paths  reinvention  motivations  passions 
august 2010 by jerryking
Business: Driven to distraction; Schumpeter
Jan 16, 2010 | The Economist. : Vol. 394, Iss. 8665; pg. 66 | Anonymous.
ProQuest  book_reviews  Daniel_Pink  motivations 
april 2010 by jerryking
Why there is more to motivation than carrots and sticks
Feb 18, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 14 | by Stefan Stern who
reviews "Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us" By Daniel
H. Pink Riverhead $26.95/ Canongate pound(s)12.99.
ProQuest  Stefan_Stern  motivations  Daniel_Pink  book_reviews  rewards 
april 2010 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: The motivational paradox of big bonuses
Friday, September 11, 2009 | The Glober & Mai l| SUSAN
PINKER. Susan Pinker is a psychologist and author of The Sexual
Paradox: Extreme Men, Gifted Women and the Real Gender Gap. Her blog,
The Business Brain, can be found at
http://susanpinkerbusinessbrain.blogspot.com
Susan_Pinker  bonuses  motivations  recruiting  hiring 
april 2010 by jerryking
Fear of China - WSJ.com
APRIL 21, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by ROBERT D. KAPLAN.
"Given the stakes involved in the competition between the U.S. and China
in the new century, the only way that the business community's optimism
can be sustained is if the U.S. military thinks and plans in terms of
worst-case scenarios." "Motives -- especially in a dynamic and volatile
society such as China's -- can easily change over time, and are
dependent upon unforeseen domestic and foreign crises. Thus, when it
comes to countries that are not allies, the job of a military is to
think in terms of capabilities; not motives."... While American and
European elites think purely in terms of globalization, Chinese leaders
think also in terms of 19th-century grand strategy. "relationships are
more important than hardware." "Thinking pessimistically about China
should never be a self-fulfilling prophecy,"
Robert_Kaplan  China  ambitions  scenario-planning  worst-case  U.S._military  motivations  capabilities  strategic_thinking  PACOM  grand_strategy  thinking_tragically 
march 2010 by jerryking
Nine hard truths
September 2005 | PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence. The
immutable laws of being your own boss, and five ways to transcend them
all. 1. the 40-hr. workweek is not your friend. 2. Everyone is looking
for something new. But no one has any money for anything new. 3. All
the people you meet at a networking function are trying to sell you
something; 4. The phone doesn't ring by itself--make your own calls if
you want the phone to ring. 5. At any given time, everyone you want to
contact is in a meeting. 6. Basic courtesy is deader than Sir John A.
Macdonald. No one returns phone calls anymore. 7. Allies are like
employees: hard to find, hard to live without. 8. Opportunities are all
around you, but differentiating between an "opportunity" and a genuine
source of revenue-that's hard. 9. Most of the people you meet at large
corps. dream of working for themselves. KSFs: 1. Know what your market
wants. 2. Get yourself a peer group. 3. Trust in karma. 4. Be brave. 5.
Give it away.
motivations  inspiration  Rick_Spence  rules_of_the_game  ksfs  pay_it_forward  self-employment  owners  entrepreneurship  opportunities  karma  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  revenue_generation  interpretation  second-order  hard_to_find  courtesies  hard_truths  it's_up_to_me 
february 2010 by jerryking
How to Value the Advertising-Supported Internet - John Quelch - Harvard Business Review
John Quelch

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valuations  performance_reviews  John_Quelch  unconventional  Haiti  HBR  motivations  social_media  advertising 
february 2010 by jerryking
There's a price to being a player
Oct 19, 1998 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.17 | by Barbara
Moses. We are all motivated by different things. The key to going after
what you want and making effective career decisions is being aware of
what makes you feel important. Know yourself. If you want to be a
player, don't be embarrassed. Some people, especially women, feel it's
somehow unseemly to want be a player, or to demonstrate the necessary
competitiveness. Try to identify what it means to you to be a player,
and the stage on which you want to play. Instead of just driving to
become a player in your professional life, look to be a player in your
whole life.
Barbara_Moses  self-analysis  motivations  Managing_Your_Career  self-actualization  Bay_Street 
october 2009 by jerryking
Do it Fucking Now.
January 29th, 2007 | SEO Blackhat | by Quadszilla
motivations  inspiration  self-discipline  work_habits 
july 2009 by jerryking

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