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jerryking : mundane   2

Wall Street’s Insatiable Lust: Data, Data, Data
By BRADLEY HOPE
Updated Sept. 12, 2016

One of his best strategies is to attend the most seemingly mundane gatherings, such as the Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management conference in San Diego last year, and the National Industrial Transportation League event in New Orleans.

“I walk the floor, try to talk to companies and get a sense within an industry of who collects data that could provide a unique insight into that industry,” he said.....Data hunters scour the business world for companies that have data useful for predicting the stock prices of other companies. For instance, a company that processes transactions at stores could have market-moving information on how certain products or brands are selling or a company that provides software to hospitals could give insights into how specific medical devices are being used......A host of startups also are trying to make it easier for funds without high-powered data-science staffers to get the same insights. One, called Quandl Inc., based in Toronto, offers a platform that includes traditional market data alongside several “alternative” data....
alternative_data  conferences  data  data_hunting  hedge_funds  insights  investors  exhaust_data  market_moving  medical_devices  mundane  private_equity  Quandl  quants  sentiment_analysis  unconventional  unglamorous  Wall_Street 
september 2016 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: Gimme much more
April 25, 2008 G&M column by DOUG STEINER

We all want more information about everything. Yet we often can't get the precious data we need to make good financial decisions, or we don't bother. ...."ANALYZE BEFORE YOU INVEST." We agreed that we didn't heed that advice often enough. But to ABYI, you need hard data, and few companies have ever been eager to disclose it......In 1930's Ontario, companies were only required to table their financial results at their annual meeting, so managers held the meeting in an out-of-the-way place. In 1945, the Ontario Securities Act finally required any company selling shares to the public to provide full and plain disclosure of key financial information in its prospectus.

It wasn't until 1958 that Ontario required companies to file prompt reports of any "material change" in their business. Insider trading on the basis of information not available to the public wasn't outlawed until 1966.....regulators only enforce rules or draw up new ones after problems arise. To act pre-emptively would be hellishly unproductive, and might prompt companies and capital markets to move elsewhere........Better disclosure can help both investors and executives....Even without disclosure rules, you can dig up lots of information about the executives of companies in your portfolio. Last year, U.S. academics David Yermack and Crocker Liu published a study that compared the size and prices of houses bought by CEOs with their companies' share prices. The duo used the excellent U.S. real estate site Zillow.com and other public sources to gather data. On average, the bigger and pricier the home purchased, the worse the subsequent share price performance.

I like to invest in companies where I know the senior managers, and I'm lucky to know many of them. In some cases, much of the information about their character appears in the media. I prefer executives who don't have big photos in their offices of themselves with politicians and other notables. I like CEOs who drive older cars, work all the time and have no hobbies. Boring, focused and cheap.
data  Doug_Steiner  disclosure  '30s  insider_trading  CEOs  mundane  prospectuses  cost-consciousness  focus  unglamorous  boring  investors 
february 2009 by jerryking

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