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jerryking : naivete   11

Canada must not be naive when dealing with China’s authoritarian regime
March 4, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HUGH SEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Claws of the Panda, Jonathan Manthorpe’s new best-selling book, a meticulous and well-researched highly readable history of decades of Canada-China relations, is important because it's a primer on the central challenge of our era – how democracies address the scope and depth of an authoritarian wave now picking up momentum.....The Communist Party of China, its presumption of sovereignty not only at home, but also over ethnic Chinese worldwide, is not about to relinquish or dilute its central and presumptive power and control. It certainly won’t do this as a result of peaceful entreaties from middle powers, however respectful or well-meaning.....while the People’s Republic of China has every right to manage its internal affairs without interference, we also have the right to pursue our own national interest without undue Chinese influence......Manthorpe’s work clearly underlines is the economic, social and political equation at China’s core: Prosperity is the result of central control, focus and a clearly defined Communist Party and state-driven purpose. Qualities we hold as important – the right of dissent, democratic pluralism, freedom from fear – are seen by the Chinese government as weaknesses in our democratic societies to be exploited in the new great game of global trade and diplomatic competition.......Our challenge, in terms of diplomatic, trade and strategic policy, is with the Communist Party and the government and forces it controls, not with the Chinese people.........In assessing the intent of any global competitor, contextual awareness is one of the first requirements for tactical understanding and strategic planning. The revelations of Claws of the Panda offer a clear set of contextual conclusions for a well meaning middle power like Canada......We need new rules of the road.

Our engagement with China must set aside the temptations of presuming fair minded universal intent on the part of Chinese state-controlled instruments, economic, diplomatic or military. We must be more focused on the protection of our own security and freedoms from Chinese subversion, including the freedoms of our fellow Canadians of Chinese extraction. Countries that wish access to our resources, technology and investment on normative terms do not get to launch cyber attacks against us, from military and intelligence units controlled by the state. We must invest more with our allies in counter-intelligence and joint naval, air and cyber capacity in the Asian Pacific, not to threaten China’s legitimate regional dominance, or peaceful global economic aspirations, but to preclude illegitimate adventurism which a Chinese communist authoritarian regime might well pursue if costs and risks to them are unclear.
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Claws of the Panda gives a detailed description of the CCP's campaign to embed agents of influence in Canadian business, politics, media and academia. The party's aims are to be able to turn Canadian public policy to China's advantage, to acquire useful technology and intellectual property, to influence Canada's international diplomacy, and, most important, to be able to monitor and intimidate Chinese Canadians and others it considers dissidents.
authoritarian  alliances  Asia_Pacific  authoritarianism  books  Canada  Canada-China_relations  centralized_control  China  China_rising  Chinese  Chinese-Canadians  Chinese_Communist_Party  counterintelligence  cyberattacks  economic_protectionism  history  Hugh_Segal  maritime  mercantilism  middle-powers  naivete  new_rules  primers  rules_of_the_game  situational_awareness  worldviews  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  security_&_intelligence 
march 2019 by jerryking
Naive entrepreneurs at risk of losing out to venture capitalists
Jan. 20, 2016 | The Financial Times News: p6. | Murad Ahmed

Tech start-up financing is often structured to protect venture capitalists, not founders, says Murad Ahmed

Nicolas Brusson and Philip...
entrepreneur  founders  vc  venture_capital  France  BlaBlaCar  trustworthiness  relationships  funding  asymmetrical  investors  naivete  connected_cars 
april 2017 by jerryking
The murky world of Chinese influence - The Globe and Mail
CHARLES BURTON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 17, 2015

Indeed, it’s worth noting that Canadian officials and politicians who favour closer economic relations with China – playing down concerns about human rights, espionage, unfair trade practices, support for repressive Third World regimes and so on – have generally not been of Chinese origin. It’s troubling that many of these same people, after they leave politics, end up making serious money in China-related trade or lucrative China-related board of directors’ appointments. This most recently applies to Mr. Baird himself and very much so to his predecessor David Emerson, but also to former prime ministers, former Canadian ambassadors to China and many others, of all political stripes. Chinese money is seemingly welcomed almost everywhere in Canada, but it inevitably comes with strings attached: expectations of reciprocal “friendship” that lead back to the Chinese Communists and their ever-more influential global business conglomerates headquartered in Beijing.

This is not a reciprocal relationship. It is unlikely that there are many telephone calls going on between any of our consuls-general in China and influential Chinese political actors comparable in rank to our Michael Chan.

Canada could be managing these concerns much better. The Chinese money is there, but not the Canadian political will.
China  security_&_intelligence  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  naivete  political_power  Chinese  politicians  CSIS  lobbying  revolving_door  Canada-China_relations  Charles_Burton 
june 2015 by jerryking
Ottawa’s diplomatic approach to China naive, says former ambassador - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 02 2015

In his coming book, Middle Power, Middle Kingdom, Mr. Mulroney takes issue with the federal government’s cultivation of the ambassador and his close working rapport with political staffers in the foreign affairs department.
diplomacy  China  books  John_Baird  foreign_policy  naivete  middle-powers 
march 2015 by jerryking
Tech Investor to Entrepreneurs: A Harvard Degree Is a Liability - NYTimes.com
February 10, 2014, 11:04 am
Tech Investor to Entrepreneurs: A Harvard Degree Is a Liability
By WILLIAM ALDEN
HBS  start_ups  venture_capital  naivete 
february 2014 by jerryking
Bill Gates is naive, data is not objective | mathbabe
January 29, 2013 Cathy O'Neil,

Don’t be fooled by the mathematical imprimatur: behind every model and every data set is a political process that chose that data and built that model and defined success for that model.
billgates  naivete  data  Cathy_O’Neil  value_judgements  datasets  biases 
december 2013 by jerryking
Open data is not a panacea | mathbabe
December 29, 2012 Cathy O'Neil,
And it’s not just about speed. You can have hugely important, rich, and large data sets sitting in a lump on a publicly available website like wikipedia, and if you don’t have fancy parsing tools and algorithms you’re not going to be able to make use of it.

When important data goes public, the edge goes to the most sophisticated data engineer, not the general public. The Goldman Sachs’s of the world will always know how to make use of “freely available to everyone” data before the average guy.

Which brings me to my second point about open data. It’s general wisdom that we should hope for the best but prepare for the worst. My feeling is that as we move towards open data we are doing plenty of the hoping part but not enough of the preparing part.

If there’s one thing I learned working in finance, it’s not to be naive about how information will be used. You’ve got to learn to think like an asshole to really see what to worry about. It’s a skill which I don’t regret having.

So, if you’re giving me information on where public schools need help, I’m going to imagine using that information to cut off credit for people who live nearby. If you tell me where environmental complaints are being served, I’m going to draw a map and see where they aren’t being served so I can take my questionable business practices there.
open_data  unintended_consequences  preparation  skepticism  naivete  no_regrets  Goldman_Sachs  tools  algorithms  Cathy_O’Neil  thinking_tragically  slight_edge  sophisticated  unfair_advantages  smart_people  data_scientists  gaming_the_system  dark_side 
december 2013 by jerryking
What Data Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 18, 2013

there are many things big data does poorly. Let’s note a few in rapid-fire fashion:

* Data struggles with the social. Your brain is pretty bad at math (quick, what’s the square root of 437), but it’s excellent at social cognition. People are really good at mirroring each other’s emotional states, at detecting uncooperative behavior and at assigning value to things through emotion.
* Data struggles with context. Human decisions are embedded in contexts. The human brain has evolved to account for this reality...Data analysis is pretty bad at narrative and emergent thinking.
* Data creates bigger haystacks. This is a point Nassim Taleb, the author of “Antifragile,” has made. As we acquire more data, we have the ability to find many, many more statistically significant correlations. Most of these correlations are spurious and deceive us when we’re trying to understand a situation.
* Big data has trouble with big (e.g. societal) problems.
* Data favors memes over masterpieces. Data analysis can detect when large numbers of people take an instant liking to some cultural product. But many important (and profitable) products are hated initially because they are unfamiliar. [The unfamiliar has to accomplish behavioural change / bridge cultural divides]
* Data obscures hidden/implicit value judgements. I recently saw an academic book with the excellent title, “ ‘Raw Data’ Is an Oxymoron.” One of the points was that data is never raw; it’s always structured according to somebody’s predispositions and values. The end result looks disinterested, but, in reality, there are value choices all the way through, from construction to interpretation.

This is not to argue that big data isn’t a great tool. It’s just that, like any tool, it’s good at some things and not at others. As the Yale professor Edward Tufte has said, “The world is much more interesting than any one discipline.”
massive_data_sets  David_Brooks  data_driven  decision_making  data  Nassim_Taleb  contrarians  skepticism  new_graduates  contextual  risks  social_cognition  self-deception  correlations  value_judgements  haystacks  narratives  memes  unfamiliarity  naivete  hidden  Edward_Tufte  emotions  antifragility  behavioral_change  new_products  cultural_products  masterpieces  EQ  emotional_intelligence 
february 2013 by jerryking
Crovitz: Iran's Ahmadinejad, Information Pariah - WSJ.com
SEPT. 27, 2010 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ. When a
dictator's lies are so easily unmasked, can his threats be ignored?
Sometimes the reasonable response to threats is to take them seriously.
In his history of WW II, Churchill identified the theme of the 1st vol.
("The Gathering Storm") as "how the English-speaking peoples through
their unwisdom, & carelessness allowed the wicked to return."
Churchill spent the 1930s in the political wilderness, warning that
Hitler meant what he wrote in "Mein Kampf". He wrote that German
"opportunities for concealment, camouflage, & treaty evasion are
numerous & varied." For an info. pariah who persecutes his own
people & threatens others, the presumption must be that his
rhetoric, no matter how extreme, reflects his policy...Today, a leader
who consistently mocks, lies & threatens deserves to be set apart.
We can`t plead misunderstanding & will have ourselves to blame if
Ahmadinejad achieves his ambition of a bomb to back up his threats.
Iran  Ahmadinejad  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Winston_Churchill  lying  political_wilderness  '30s  WWII  threats  nuclear  presumptions  naivete 
september 2010 by jerryking
Canadians blind to terror threat: top spy - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 29, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Colin Freeze. Canadians
are blind to the threat posed by terrorists who publicly espouse their
rights while privately believing in nothing but “nihilism and death,”
Canada's new spy chief says.He said that security and liberty should not
viewed as a zero-sum balancing act, but rather as a DNA double-helix
structure where the two strands reinforce one another.
CSIS  terrorism  security_&_intelligence  Canada  threats  naivete 
november 2009 by jerryking
The Naive Approach to Hiring People
Monday, February 11, 2008 | Raganald | Reg Braithwaite
hiring  recruiting  algorithms  ideas  Joel_Spolsky  interviews  howto  naivete 
may 2009 by jerryking

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