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Keeping the Mink Mile hot in a cooling retail era - The Globe and Mail
WALLACE IMMEN
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 19, 2019

* HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE IS PUSHING ITS BOUNDARIES
The affluence of this retail location influences nearby streets, spilling north to the area’s namesake Yorkville Avenue.
Turns out this northern stretch of Yorkville Avenue between the Hazelton Hotel at 118 Yorkville Ave. and Bellair Street has seen rents nearly double over the course of three years, currently averaging between $250 and $275 a square foot, JLL found. By comparison, leases on Toronto’s Queen Street West average $100 a square foot, Robson Street in Vancouver $225 and Saint-Catherine Street in Montreal $210, JLL reports. Of course, those numbers pale in comparison to New York’s upper Fifth Avenue, where rents can reach US$2,720, the Beverly Hills triangle in Los Angeles that can command US$1,100 and Oxford Street in London where prime rents are the equivalent of US$775.

* GROWTH IN UPSCALE SHOPPING AREA ISN’T AN ACCIDENT
Yorkville’s launch into the upper echelons didn’t happen by accident, though. Even a few years ago, there was speculation that with shifts in retailing toward more online shopping and a retrenchment of brands that the zone north of the Mink Mile would fall into decline.

Yorkville was getting decidedly shop worn by 2011, when First Capital Properties, a subsidiary of First Capital Realty Inc., acquired Hazelton Lanes, a 1970s shopping mall at the corner of Avenue Road and Yorkville Avenue.

To pump life into the area, First Capital developed a long-term vision for Yorkville that started with a total renovation of the old mall – to give it more street presence. The redevelopment also allowed for a rebranding and the mall became known as Yorkville Village.....There are about 11,000 condominium units in the immediate area and that’s destined to double in the next two years based on what is planned for the area and what is currently under construction.

Add to this the tourism and the business community along Bloor Street and the University of Toronto, and the area is rich in potential customers,

* TREND IN HIGH-END RETAILING REQUIRES ONGOING COMMUNITY SUPPORT
In the past, many brands shifted their flagship stores into enclosed malls, but there’s now a shift back to brands – particularly the higher-end and exclusive name brands – having their main flagship stores at street level in Yorkville.......While the trend in high-end retailing is as much a developer’s vision as it is a retailer’s desire, a lot of the growth in this luxury retail space can be attributed to continual community-building efforts.

“We work in collaboration with other landlords and retailers and galleries in the area to create a sense of neighbourhood,” says Melissa Campisi, First Capital’s director of strategic partnerships and event management.....Events and attractions throughout the year are key to building a retail experience.... In a space that was formerly an Anthoropolgie store, First Capital arranged fashion talks and charity events........

* THE FUTURE OF THE HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE AT YORKVILLE
The Yorkville area is destined to become even more of a world-class retail destination as the area transforms with an unprecedented amount of construction and new leasing activity......The trends are in favour of growth for luxury retail, concludes the 2019 Canadian Luxury Apparel Market report by retail marketing research firm Trendex North America...... the Canadian luxury apparel market will increase by 5.8 per cent in 2019 and by 18 per cent from 2019 to 2023, to reach $3.2-billion in sales within the next five years.....More importantly,...the luxury sector growth rate will be nearly twice that of the overall clothing retail sector.
affluence  brands  densification  high-end  luxury  Mink_Mile  neighbourhoods  property_development  real_estate  rebranding  retailers  Toronto  upscale  urban_intensification  uToronto  Wallace_Immen  Yorkville 
november 2019 by jerryking
The Meadoway: 16 km stretch of urban park will connect downtown to Scarborough | CBC News
Posted: Apr 11, 2018 | CBC News | by Ramna Shahzad.

The park will connect 4 ravines, 15 parks and 34 neighbourhoods.

A 16-kilometre long stretch of land slated to be transformed into a large urban park called The Meadoway is "a bold vision," Mayor John Tory said on Wednesday.

The park, which will stretch north from the Don River Ravine in downtown Toronto all the way to Rouge National Urban Park in Scarborough, will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel the entire length without ever leaving the park. .......The city is working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the W. Garfield Weston Foundation to transform a barren power corridor into the green space over the next seven years.

The entire project is expected to cost around $85 million. The W. Garfield Weston Foundation has pledged a total of $25 million to support it over the coming months.

"[The park] serves as another example of what can be accomplished when we work together with public, private and philanthropic partners,"
bicycles  cycling  Don_River  habitats  landscapes  linearity  Meadoway  neighbourhoods  outdoors  parks  philanthropy  public_spaces  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Toronto  TRCA  urban  wilderness  green_spaces 
july 2019 by jerryking
Toronto’s tech boom is transforming the city
July 26, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | MARCUS GEE.

the tech industry that is transforming Toronto. The city is in the midst of a spectacular tech boom. Big firms such as Microsoft, Twitter, Uber, Google and Netflix are setting up shop or expanding here. Thousands of workers are coming to live and work in the city. Thousands of startup companies are revving their engines.

The pell-mell growth of the city comes in part from the rise of tech. Patrick Fejér of B+H Architects says 10 million square feet of new office space is due to open by 2024, more than was built from 1992 to the present. Toronto, he says, has more than 120 construction cranes in the air, compared with 65 in Seattle and 35 in New York.

CBRE, a real estate consultancy, says that Toronto is the fastest-growing market for tech talent in North America, “adding an eye-popping 80,100 tech jobs in the past five years, a 54-per-cent increase.” It now ranks third, just behind San Francisco’s Bay Area and Seattle.
Big_Tech  creative_class  downtown_core  housing  King-Spadina  Kitchener-Waterloo  livability  Marcus_Gee  millennials  neighbourhoods  Port_Lands  property_development  Sidewalk_Labs  talent  Toronto  transformational  transit  walkability  technology 
july 2019 by jerryking
Don’t mourn bohemia — it’s everywhere now
DECEMBER 28, 2018 | Financial Times | Janan Ganesh.

We think of offbeat enclaves as a thing of the past. But bohemia isn’t gone, it’s just permeated the whole of city life.
bohemians  creative_types  creative_class  enclaves  Janan_Ganesh  neighbourhoods  gentrification  New_York_City  offbeat 
december 2018 by jerryking
Despite Amazon effect, not all mom and pops in trouble on Main St.
Chris Morris, special to CNBC.com Published 8:53 AM ET Fri, 11 Aug 2017

With so many major retailers struggling to stay afloat, it'd be easy to think smaller, mom-and-pop stores are doing even worse, or might be largely fading away. The recent demise of retail giants, however, has left a brick-and-mortar vacuum for local stores to fill.

And many experts say it might be best to stay small. Being a micro-sized business certainly isn't protection against big-box retailers or online competitors, but being a small business that's an integral part of a local community can help build a loyal customer base.

"The vast majority of mom-and-pop businesses are either neighborhood retail businesses or small service businesses," says Leonard Schlesinger, Baker Foundation professor at the Harvard Business School. "As neighborhood businesses, they play a significant role in neighborhood stabilization, [providing convenience for people living close by]."
Amazon  big-box  mom-and-pop  retailers  e-commerce  ethnic_communities  convenience_stores  local  customer_loyalty  small_business  department_stores  neighbourhoods 
january 2018 by jerryking
The Summer of Love: A Walking Tour of San Francisco, 50 Years Later
Unfurling from the eastern border of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, the Haight served as the epicenter of America’s 1960s counterculture movement. “The Haight-Ashbury was the product of teen rebellion against 1950s’ regimentation and the Vietnam War,” said a guide for the local Flower Power Walking Tour who goes by the name Stannous Flouride. “The anarchic aspect was seen as a threat against the establishment but ultimately had a profound influence on American culture.” Cheap rents, more than anything else, drew the first wave of bohemians in the early 1960s. Legions followed, cresting in 1967 when some 100,000 students, musicians and others flocked to San Francisco for a summer of drug-enhanced communing and revelry that horrified parents. This year, to mark the anniversary, events from concerts to art exhibits are being staged throughout the Bay Area (see summeroflove2017.com for details).

Hit songs of 1967 included the Airplane’s “White Rabbit,” “San Franciscan Nights” (inspired by a night Eric Burdon spent with Janis Joplin) and the blissed-out ballad “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair).”
1967  San_Francisco  psychedelic  summertime  epicenters  neighbourhoods  gentrification  bohemians  things_to_do  anniversaries  counterculture 
may 2017 by jerryking
What Kal Penn, Actor and Obama White House Alumnus, Loves About Toronto - The New York Times
By JOHN L. DORMAN MAY 3, 2017

Actor Kal Penn is the former associate director of the Office of Public Engagement under President Barack Obama, and currently stars as the press secretary Seth Wright on the ABC drama “Designated Survivor.”........Is there an area in Toronto that you gravitate toward?

There’s a neighborhood called Parkdale that I really like, which has an interesting Tibetan population. There’s a lot of great food, and I don’t mean fancy places where you dress up and go to dinner, but really great hole in the wall, authentic places to grab food. It’s a really nice neighborhood, in the West End of the city. Little Portugal is another great neighborhood, with really nice shops and restaurants........Talking to people whom we disagree with is more important now than it has been before, and I don’t mean just ranting on your Facebook wall. A conversation tends to go very differently when you’re having a beer with someone that you disagree with, compared to sending a nasty tweet to someone because you want to make yourself feel better.
actors  White_House  Toronto  public_discourse  Parkdale  disagreements  neighbourhoods  Queen_Street 
may 2017 by jerryking
Why I’m Moving Home
MARCH 16, 2017 | The New York Times | By J. D. VANCE.

" The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do.

The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare." ......“The sociological role [colleges and universities] play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation....This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture...JD Vance has decided to move [back] home-to Ohio....."we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions."
sorting  segregation  neighbourhoods  polarization  geographic_mobility  brain_drain  super_ZIPs  cultural_detachment  Rust_Belt  midwest  Red_states  whites  political_partisanship  political_polarization  working_class  J.D._Vance  highly_skilled  industrial_Midwest  Appalachia  cities  engaged_citizenry  talent  Charles_Murray  civics  social_mobility  self-perpetuation  values  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  geographic_sorting  regional  compartmentalization 
march 2017 by jerryking
Mapping Where Torontonians Bike and Run
FEBRUARY 2, 2015 | Torontoist | BY DAVID HAINS

Developers map out the world's most popular spots for walking, jogging, and cycling—and reveal where in this city Torontonians like, and don't like, to get outside and get active.

....the maps show pieces of a larger story. The most popular trails might seem simply like fun places for a run or merely the result of individual choices, but they’re part of a larger context that governs how the city works—how the built and natural environment, a community’s land-use mix, housing affordability, community health options, and other factors affect the way we relate to and use different parts of the city.
affordable_housing  cardiovascular  community_health  correlations  cycling  diabetes  green_spaces  health_outcomes  healthy_lifestyles  land_uses  mapping  neighbourhoods  parks  public_policy  ravines  running  Toronto  self-selection 
january 2017 by jerryking
A superpark hides in Toronto’s Don Valley, waiting to be discovered - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 15, 2016

historian Jennifer L. Bonnell wrote in her 2014 book Reclaiming the Don.

A few small moves would get it in motion. Proponents envision new bike lanes on Bayview Avenue that would make it less terrifying to go there on two wheels. An old rail trestle would become a pedestrian bridge. New bridges, stairs and paths would welcome people from Cabbagetown and from Regent Park, from Corktown and the emerging neighbourhoods in and around the Port Lands.

But in the longer term, the plan would mean combining two rail corridors, both controlled by Metrolinx, reconfiguring the DVP ramp to Bloor-Bayview and removing a city works yard that now sits in the middle of the valley. But governments are budgeting at least $1-billion for roads, water, parks and rail improvements in this zone, including the electrification of GO’s train lines and the Gardiner Expressway rebuild. The river is unruly, prone to powerful floods; a thoughtful, coherent landscape would mitigate the risks for infrastructure and serve the environment of the valley.
books  Brickworks  Cabbagetown  Corktown  design  Don_River  DVP  Evergreen  floodplains  floods  Gardiner_Expressway  GO  green_spaces  history  landscapes  Metrolinx  neighbourhoods  parks  Port_Lands  railways  ravines  regeneration  Regent_Park  small_moves  sustainability  Toronto  undervalued 
april 2016 by jerryking
Jump to the front of the line with this app - The Globe and Mail
JOSH O'KANE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015

“The idea at a really high level is, can we make local commerce better if it were way, way faster, and we removed all the friction of waiting and in-store payment?” asks Mr. Reddy, who co-founded Ritual with Robert Kim.

Ritual was designed as a hyper-local service.

....ask yourself whether you’re in the productivity business or convenience business. Or even better, ask your users. This could change the way you think about your business and its future.
neighbourhoods  restaurants  mobile_applications  wait_times  hyperlocal  frictions  in-store  scaling  Ritual  queuing 
december 2015 by jerryking
Divisions between pre-amalgamation cities making rich-poor gap worse: report - The Globe and Mail
ANN HUI
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 06, 2015

"The poverty is not caused by the neighbourhood. Other factors are at play--parenting, value systems. But it's just appealing to blame external factors, like city hall or the TTC (not enough buses! That's why I'm poor!) and so articles like this do."
Toronto  income_inequality  Scarborough  poverty  neighbourhoods  deindustrialization  disparities  value_systems 
october 2015 by jerryking
Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Is Growing Wider - The New York Times
SEPT. 22, 2015 | NYT | Eduardo Porter.

For all the progress in improving educational outcomes among African-American children, the achievement gaps between more affluent and less privileged children is wider than ever, notes Sean Reardon of the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford. Racial disparities are still a stain on American society, but they are no longer the main divider. Today the biggest threat to the American dream is class.....Financed mainly by real estate taxes that are more plentiful in neighborhoods with expensive homes, public education is becoming increasingly compartmentalized. Well-funded schools where the children of the affluent can play and learn with each other are cordoned off from the shabbier schools teaching the poor, who are still disproportionally from black or Hispanic backgrounds.
poverty  African-Americans  income_inequality  racial_disparities  real_estate_taxes  education  achievement_gaps  social_classes  public_education  sorting  segregation  geographic_sorting  neighbourhoods  children  affluence  upper-income  super_ZIPs  compartmentalization  the_American_dream 
september 2015 by jerryking
The Toronto Poetry Map: See (and read) a new way of exploring the city - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 13 2015

The Toronto Poetry Map captures the city in words. Click on an area and you’ll be presented with an excerpt, or several, from works referencing the street, or landmark, or neighbourhood....“The metaphysical Toronto is what we actually see in this map,” says Clarke. “The Toronto that’s conjured up by our imaginations as we ponder the reality of our existence here.”
poems  poetry  poets  Toronto  mapping  metaphysical  neighbourhoods  streetscapes  storytelling  imagination  landmarks 
april 2015 by jerryking
The Laneway Project: How one small idea could bring new life to Toronto’s back alleys - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 20 2015

The Laneway Project. Its organizers, a trio of Toronto planners and urban designers, are working with city officials and community groups to find ways to green, beautify and enliven Toronto’s back lanes, turning them into places where people want to spend time instead of simply pass through.
ideas  civics  design  public_spaces  neighbourhoods  Toronto  green  beautification  urban  Marcus_Gee 
march 2015 by jerryking
Fighting inequality is not a job for Toronto’s new mayor - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 04 2014,

Inequality is a society-wide phenomenon best addressed through national and provincial policy tools – partly taxes, but mostly by fostering equality of opportunity with good public schools and health care.

Besides, a higher minimum wage for Toronto alone would only end up hurting those it is meant to help, leading to fewer hours, less job creation and a shift in employment to the suburbs. It would also drive up the cost of living for those least able to absorb it.

City governments can do their part to mitigate inequality by creating safe neighbourhoods, with parks and recreation facilities, accessible public transit and by providing adequate social housing to those who truly need it. Mr. Tory will have his hands full as it is.
Konrad_Yakabuski  mayoral  Toronto  John_Tory  inequality  policy_tools  equality_of_opportunity  public_schools  public_transit  neighbourhoods  parks  social_housing 
december 2014 by jerryking
How Consumers Are Using Big Data - WSJ
By LORA KOLODNY CONNECT
March 23, 2014

An app called Neighborland, created by social entrepreneurs Candy Chang and Dan Parham, aims to help community groups and government offices work well together. The app combines photos, data and APIs from sources including Twitter, Google Maps and Instagram, agencies that report on real-estate parcels, transit systems, and "311" complaints about nuisances like noise, broken lights and garbage.

In 2012, the New Orleans Food Truck Coalition used Neighborland to collect community ideas, map "food deserts," which are areas lacking easy access to groceries and healthy food, and show what the economic and health impact could be if coalition members were permitted to work in more areas.
311  massive_data_sets  APIs  data  analytics  Amazon  Pandora  Netflix  Nike  Jawbone  fitness  CDC  infertility  travel  Skyscanner  Routehappy  open_data  mobile_applications  consumers  hyperlocal  neighbourhoods 
november 2014 by jerryking
Toronto school fundraising raises questions about equity in public-education system - The Globe and Mail
CAROLINE ALPHONSO AND KATE HAMMER - EDUCATION REPORTERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014
education  TDSB  fundraising  neighbourhoods  Toronto 
november 2014 by jerryking
Why competent city government matters - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 29 2014

Everywhere, “densification” of downtowns is the order of the day, which makes eminent sense, provided the increasing density is done properly from planning, lifestyle, transportation, and carbon emissions reductions perspectives (which hasn’t been the case in central Toronto’s condo-land, as one example).

Cities are on the front line of many issues that transcend their boundaries, climate change being one. Municipal governments have a host of powers – garbage, building codes, development, transit – that directly affect carbon emissions. What they do, or don’t, is consequential for the country’s overall record.

Similarly, how cities integrate newcomers to Canada affects the entire country’s civic life and economic prospects. Thus far, the melding of so many immigrants into the Canadian mainstream has been one of the country’s most significant accomplishments. It happens, overwhelmingly, in neighbourhoods, schools and other urban public places.
cities  mayoral  densification  Toronto  government  Jeffrey_Simpson  urban  urban_intensification  arrival_cities  neighbourhoods  competence  Michael_Thompson  social_integration 
october 2014 by jerryking
When it comes to the arts, here’s what Toronto needs in a mayor - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

In their statement, they say they want a Toronto that is ambitious, creative, accessible, forward-thinking, responsive, collaborative and imaginative.

They say the city needs a mayor who has a strategic vision, consensus-building leadership skills and a passion for Toronto; who embodies inclusiveness in all interactions; and who balances the budget.

They also identify five things Toronto needs in order to thrive: a creative and innovative economy, healthy and productive citizens, a vibrant cultural sector, affordable and accessible transportation, and beautiful and connected neighbourhoods and green spaces.
cultural_institutions  art  museums  Toronto  elections  mayoral  ROM  AGO  TIFF  neighbourhoods  parks  public_spaces  forward-thinking  green_spaces 
july 2014 by jerryking
Livable, booming core stirs envy, but raises infrastructure worries - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Young people are flocking to inhabit the lively, walkable neighbourhoods springing up downtown. In some, such as King-Spadina and Waterfront West, seven out of 10 residents are ‘echo boomers,’ 20 to 39 years old.

The number of people working downtown has been soaring, too. Downtown gained more than 43,000 office jobs in the five years to 2011. A host of big companies, from Google to Telus to Coca-Cola, have moved into new downtown offices. Although downtown contains just 3 per cent of the city’s land area, it accounts for half of its GDP, a third of its jobs and a quarter of its tax base. More than a quarter of a million people commute into downtown each morning by public transit.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  downtown_core  Big_Tech  millennials  neighbourhoods  King-Spadina  Port_Lands  livability  walkability 
june 2014 by jerryking
Fighting fires with data: How killing the long-form census hurt community planning - The Globe and Mail
JOE FRIESEN - DEMOGRAPHICS REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Most people use the company’s data in conjunction with a mapping tool and segmentation analysis, which sorts the population into lifestyle categories such as “Middleburg Managers” and “Young Digerati,” to better understand their habits and tastes. A library, for example, found that despite having a large population of senior citizens, programs advertised to “seniors” were a bust. Having looked more closely at their income and lifestyle data, they targeted the same group as “mature adults” and had much more success.

“Often, the real power is in the melding of the data. They know things about their users, but not their neighbourhood, then they marry them,” said Doug Norris, chief demographer at Environics Analytics.

Robert Dalgleish, an executive director at the United Church of Canada, is eagerly awaiting new data sorted down to the DA level. He said more than 500 local congregations in the church use this kind of data to better understand the areas they inhabit. One puzz-ling finding was that for every identified member of the United Church in a congregation, there are nine others living within a few kilometres who never attend a service.

“The data doesn’t give us answers, but it gives us really good questions,” Mr. Dalgleish said. “It really allows congregations to drill down into their communities.”
Joe_Friesen  demographic_changes  data  mapping  local  data_melding  neighbourhoods  market_segmentation  analytics  churches  Statistics_Canada  firefighting  Environs  customer_segmentation 
june 2014 by jerryking
Small Area Data
Environics Analytics 416.969.2733

"Due to changes in methodology, Statistics Canada is not officially releasing dissemination area (DA) data from the 2011 NHS. But we are"
neighbourhoods  data  analytics  Statistics_Canada  small_data  Environics 
may 2014 by jerryking
Marketing Professional Services Locally
To market a professional practice exceptionally well in a local community - dubbed vicinal marketing - means to study the microcosm and satisfy it. The first step in vicinal marketing is to determine ...
marketing  professional_service_firms  local  neighbourhoods 
february 2014 by jerryking
Toronto’s problem has grown beyond its mayor
Nov. 08 2013 | The Globe and Mail |Richard Florida

Toronto must deal with an even larger schism, the one that divides its booming 21st-century economy from its outmoded growth model and system of governance. It is this – not Mr. Ford – that poses the most serious threat to Toronto’s continued prosperity....Toronto has reached a true inflection point, and the problem is not high taxes or fiscal profligacy, as many have framed it....Toronto’s biggest problem is its growth model, which has far outlived its shelf life.

When a city region like Toronto – or Atlanta, Washington, Dallas or Miami – hits the 5.5 to six million mark in population, it can no longer grow based on cars and sprawl. It has to grow upward as well as outward and has to become much more oriented to transit. Most cities fail to make the required investments and their growth stalls and falters. The truly great cities are able to invest in ways that change their growth trajectory. This is what New York did more than a century ago when it built its rail and subway lines. That’s what Toronto needs to do now if it wants to achieve its ambition to become a truly global city....To do so requires not just massive investments in transit, but more flexible building and zoning regimes that promote greater density at the core and in the suburbs alike. The dysfunction in the mayor’s office means that all this is being put on the back burner....then there is the deep and fundamental problem of the growing geographic inequality that produced Mr. Ford in the first place. ....Inequality has frustrated even the most effective mayors...[Toronto} needs a new governance system that is adequate to the new challenges it faces....Toronto can lead the world by devising a modern system that’s up to the task of investing in governing and investing in a large economically integrated city. ...the basic idea would be to create a new kind of federalism, which extends from the provincial government through the city and all the way down to the varied communities and neighbourhoods that make it up.
21st._century  building_codes  cities  communities  densification  federalism  land_uses  mayoral  neighbourhoods  NYC  Queen’s_Park  regulation  Richard_Florida  Rob_Ford  scandals  schisms  transit  Toronto  zoning  inflection_points 
november 2013 by jerryking
A murder that changed Toronto
Oct. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by GAYLE MacDONALD.
Toronto's loss of innocence....Anthony De Sa's new novel, Kicking The Sky, revolves around the murder of 12-year-old Emanuel Jaques and its impact on Toronto's Portuguese community, the city at large and three young boys who decide to search for Emanuel’s body. It is a coming-of-age story about hard truths and loss of innocence.
killings  Toronto  ethnic_communities  '70s  writers  neighbourhoods  Portuguese  coming-of-age  hard_truths 
october 2013 by jerryking
Sizing Up Big Data, Broadening Beyond the Internet - NYTimes.com
June 19, 2013 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

The story is the same in one field after another, in science, politics, crime prevention, public health, sports and industries as varied as energy and advertising. All are being transformed by data-driven discovery and decision-making. The pioneering consumer Internet companies, like Google, Facebook and Amazon, were just the start, experts say. Today, data tools and techniques are used for tasks as varied as predicting neighborhood blocks where crimes are most likely to occur and injecting intelligence into hulking industrial machines, like electrical power generators.

Big Data is the shorthand label for the phenomenon, which embraces technology, decision-making and public policy. Supplying the technology is a fast-growing market, increasing at more than 30 percent a year and likely to reach $24 billion by 2016, according to a forecast by IDC, a research firm. All the major technology companies, and a host of start-ups, are aggressively pursuing the business.

Demand is brisk for people with data skills. The McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the consulting firm, projects that the United States needs 140,000 to 190,000 more workers with “deep analytical” expertise and 1.5 million more data-literate managers, whether retrained or hired, by 2020.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  data_scientists  data_driven  open_data  neighbourhoods  decision_making  public  McKinsey 
june 2013 by jerryking
Mapping Toronto’s food territories
Mar. 22 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by AMANDA KWAN.

Brian Cook, a researcher with the city’s Food Strategy team.

Despite a huge need for a wider variety of food options, St. James Town would not show up on a “food desert” map. Often described as neighbourhoods, usually low-income, with a dearth of supermarkets, “food deserts” have become the default concept for discussing food insecurity, even though there is no consensus on how to actually define or measure them....To get a more detailed look at the various neighbourhoods in Toronto, researchers are creating a food retail environment index that calculates a score based on the number of healthier food stores within a particular block. The lower the number, the less healthy the food environment is. “So you get a kind of heat map of the city where you see hot spots and cool spots” of high and low index scores, Mr. Cook says.
Toronto  grocery  supermarkets  food  urban  neighbourhoods  St._James_Town  mapping  Cabbagetown  hotspots  low-income 
march 2013 by jerryking
Where the Singles Are: A Dating Guide by ZIP Code - NYTimes.com
February 11, 2013, 7:40 pm2 Comments
Where the Singles Are: A Dating Guide by ZIP Code
By STEVE LOHR
dating  real_estate  Steve_Lohr  relationships  data  data_driven  neighbourhoods 
february 2013 by jerryking
A harvest of history at East York's Topham Park - The Globe and Mail
Dave LeBlanc

Toronto — Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jun. 03 2010
Toronto  history  heritage  neighbourhoods  post-WWII  East_York 
november 2012 by jerryking
First on the scene
April 27, 2012 | strategy | by Melinda Mattos
crisis  branding  Canadian_Tire  Telus  CSR  Toronto  neighbourhoods 
august 2012 by jerryking
Toronto 2012: more guns, fewer resources
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | KELLY GRANT AND MATTHEW ROBINSON
Toronto  criminality  neighbourhoods 
july 2012 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 |Brian P.H. Green.

First, no neighbourhood in Toronto is a ghetto. Lodz was a ghetto. Warsaw was a ghetto. Jane/Finch or Malvern certainly are not ghettos. A ghetto has a way in, but no way out. The casual over-use of this word exaggerates the hopelessness of some of Toronto's communities. And it debases the memory of people who were truly persecuted.

Second, if you can't get a "decent job" -- in Toronto, no less -- when the economy is operating at "full capacity," then maybe there's an argument for taking personal responsibility, instead of blaming society or institutionalized racism.
African_Canadians  Toronto  fatherhood  ProQuest  personal_responsibility  ghettos  racism  hopelessness  neighbourhoods  blaming_fingerpointing  letters_to_the_editor 
november 2011 by jerryking
Toronto website gives deep look at neighbourhood statistics - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH
, Jun. 29, 2011
Want to know what neighbourhood has the highest graduation rates, the
most trees or the greatest number of car accidents?

The answers are now a click away with a new hub on the city website.
Wellbeing Toronto lets users map an array of services and demographic
information and compare the results across 140 neighbourhoods. Users can
see basic information about a neighbourhood, such as average family
income, education level and age of population by sliding their cursor
over an interactive city map. They also can delve deeper to plot
services such as daycare centres, transit stops, and even convenience
stores and supermarkets in a specific area and see how they stack up
with other parts of the city.
Toronto  websites  community  statistics  neighbourhoods  demographic_information  Elizabeth_Church  municipalities  mapping  open_data  crowdsourcing 
july 2011 by jerryking
Do Believe the Hype - NYTimes.com
Nov. 2, 2010 |NYT| Tom FRIEDMAN..."the single most important
trend in the world today: globalization — the distn of cheap tools of
comm. & innovation that are wiring together the world’s citizens,
govts., biz, terrorists — is going to a whole new level."....EKO India
Fin Services' founders, Abhishek & Abhinav Sinha , began with an
insight — that low-wage migrant workers flocking to Delhi from poorer
states like Bihar had no place to put their savings & no secure way
to remit $ home to their families. India has relatively few bank
branches for a country its size, so many migrants stuff $ in their
mattresses or send $ home through traditional “hawala,” or hand-to-hand
networks...The brothers' idea: In every neighborhood there’s a
mom-and-pop kiosk selling drinks, cigs, candy & groceries. Why not
turn each one into a virtual bank? They created a s/ware prgrm allowing
a migrant in Delhi using his cellphone, & proof of identity, to
open a bank acct. registered on his cellphone txt system.
India  entrepreneurship  start_ups  Tom_Friedman  banking  mobile_phones  low-wage  globalization  flat_world  insights  text_messages  urbanization  remittances  microfinance  fin-tech  underserved  unbanked  kiosks  neighbourhoods  internal_migration  mom-and-pop  the_single_most_important 
november 2010 by jerryking
When the Customer Is in the Neighborhood - WSJ.com
MAY 17, 2010 WSJ | By DIANA RANSOM. New tech tools let
restaurants know if potential business is around the corner. send to
Mike Ho (also Jacoline Loewen), Osh, Asif.
location_based_services  restaurants  mobile_applications  5BO  Bering  neighbourhoods 
may 2010 by jerryking
Encouraging the entrepreneurial spirit - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | ANNA MEHLER PAPERNY AND
TAVIA GRANT. Community initiative by the Black Creek Microcredit
Program to help transform Toronto's Jane-Finch neighbourhood. In Black
Creek's case, Access Community Capital is the guarantor on loans from
Alterna Savings Union.

It's both an audacious idea and a disarmingly simple one: To turn a
notoriously marginalized community into an incubator for local
entrepreneurship by making seed money available to people who can't get
their hands on the cash they need to start a business.
entrepreneurship  microlending  microfinance  Tavia_Grant  Toronto  audacity  marginalization  neighbourhoods 
february 2010 by jerryking
Leslieville's PicNic Gains a New Chef
By Jamila Allidina in Dining Guides
Last Updated:February 10,2009 1:32:25 pm
restaurant_reviews  Leslieville  Toronto  charcuterie  neighbourhoods 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: The upside of the economic downturn
March 19, 2009| The Globe & Mail | SHIVAN MICOO. Lynn Clay, executive director of the Liberty Village BIA,
Toronto  economic_development  BIAs  economic_downturn  neighbourhoods  Liberty_Village  upside  silver_linings 
march 2009 by jerryking
Blaming the Middleman
Tuesday, August 22, 2006 WSJ editorial. What Andrew Young
doesn't understand about economics. The Wall Street Journal explains to
Andrew Young, racism aside, what was wrong with his analysis of why mom
and pop stores charge more in urban areas.
entrepreneur  African-Americans  neighbourhoods  mom-and-pop  urban  racism  immigrants  retailers  convenience_stores  middlemen  Andrew_Young 
march 2009 by jerryking

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