recentpopularlog in

jerryking : networking   149

« earlier  
Why You Need a Network of Low-Stakes, Casual Friendships
May 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Allie Volpe.

The sociologist Mark Granovetter calls these low-stakes relationships “weak ties.” Not only can these connections affect our job prospects, they also can have a positive impact on our well-being by helping us feel more connected to other social groups, according to Dr. Granovetter’s research. Other studies have shown weak ties can offer recommendations (I found my accountant via a weak tie) and empower us to be more empathetic. We’re likely to feel less lonely, too, research shows.

A 2014 study found that the more weak ties a person has (neighbors, a barista at the neighborhood coffee shop or fellow members in a spin class), the happier they feel. Maintaining this network of acquaintances also contributes to one’s sense of belonging to a community, researchers found......maintaining a network of low-stakes connections further enmeshes us in our community, especially after a major move away from family and close friends or the loss of a loved one.
Communicating_&_Connecting  friendships  networking  personal_connections  personal_relationships  relationships  social_fabric  weak_links 
7 days ago by jerryking
10,000 Hours with Reid Hoffman: What I Learned | Ben Casnocha
16 Lessons Learned (Among Many!)
1. People are complicated and flawed. Root for their better angels.
2. The best way to get a busy person’s attention: Help them.
3. Keep it simple and move fast w...
lessons_learned  advice  entrepreneurship  culture  psychology  productivity  self-deception  self-delusions  success  thought_experiments  networking  career  via:enochko  Reid_Hoffman  Ben_Casnocha 
august 2018 by jerryking
Good News for Young Strivers: Networking Is Overrated - The New York Times
AUG. 24, 2017 | New York Times | Adam Grant.

it’s remarkably hard to engage [important people] unless you’ve already put something valuable out into the world. That’s what piques the curiosity of advisers and sponsors. Achievements show you have something to give, not just something to take........The best way to attract a mentor is to create something worthy of the mentor’s attention. Do something interesting, and instead of having to push your way in, you’ll get pulled in. The network comes to you.

Sociologists call this the Matthew effect, from the Bible: “For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance.” If you establish a track record of achievement, advantages tend to accumulate. Who you’ll know tomorrow depends on what you contributed yesterday......Accomplishments can build your network only if other people are aware of them. You have to put your work out there. It shouldn’t be about promoting yourself, but about promoting your ideas. ...People find self-promotion so distasteful that they like you more when you’re praised by someone else — even if they know you’ve hired an agent to promote you.

So stop fretting about networking. Take a page out of the George Lucas and Sara Blakely playbooks: Make an intriguing film, build a useful product.....In life, it certainly helps to know the right people. But how hard they go to bat for you, how far they stick their necks out for you, depends on what you have to offer. Building a powerful network doesn’t require you to be an expert at networking. It just requires you to be an expert at something.

If you make great connections, they might advance your career. If you do great work, those connections will be easier to make. Let your insights and your outputs — not your business cards — do the talking.
networking  relationships  show_your_work  Adam_Grant  hard_work  performance  mentoring  strivers  Communicating_&_Connecting  creating_valuable_content  idea_generation  personal_accomplishments  the_right_people  playbooks 
august 2017 by jerryking
How Successful People Network with Each Other
JANUARY 21, 2016 | ???| Dorie Clark. Ms. Clark is a marketing strategist and professional speaker who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. She is the author of Reinventing You and Stand Out. You can receive her free Stand Out Self-Assessment Workbook.

As you advance in your career, you have more experience and more connections to draw on for networking. But chances are you’ve also become a lot busier — as have the really successful people you’re now trying to meet. How do you get the attention of people who get dozens of invitations per week and hundreds of emails per day? And how do you find time to network with potential new clients or to recruit new employees when your calendar is packed?

The typical advice that’s given to entry-level employees — Invite people to coffee! Connect with them on LinkedIn! — simply doesn’t work for people at the top of their careers. Instead, you need to leverage an entirely different strategy, something I call “inbound networking.”

In the online world, “inbound marketing” is a term that was popularized about a decade ago by HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah. It refers to the practice of creating valuable content, such as articles or podcasts, that draws customers to you directly (as opposed to spending a lot of time on cold calls or paying for advertising to lure them in).

Networking is facing a similar inflection point. Most professionals are constantly bombarded with Facebook and LinkedIn connection requests, not to mention endless requests to “pick their brain.” Trying to stand out in the midst of that noise is a losing battle, and you probably don’t have time to send a bunch of cold emails anyway.

Instead, you can successfully network with the most prominent people by doing something very different from everyone else: attracting them to you with inbound networking. In other words, make yourself interesting enough that they choose to seek you out. Here are three ways to do it.

(1) Identify what sets you apart. (What's your special sauce?). One of the fastest ways to build a connection with someone is to find a commonality you share with them (your alma mater, a love of dogs, a passion for clean tech). That’s table stakes. But the way to genuinely capture their interest is to share something that seems exotic to them. It will often vary by context: In a roomful of political operatives, the fact that I was a former presidential campaign spokesperson is nice but not very interesting. But at a political fundraiser populated by lawyers and financiers, that background would make me a very desirable conversation partner.

The more interesting you seem, the more that powerful people will want to seek you out. And yet it can be hard for us to identify what’s most interesting about ourselves; over time, even the coolest things can come to seem banal. Ask your friends to identify the most fascinating elements of your biography, your interests, or your experiences — then do the same for them. At one recent workshop I led, we discovered that one executive had been a ball boy for the U.S. Open tennis tournament in his youth, and one attorney is an avid and regular surfer in the waters of New York City. Both are intriguing enough to spark a great conversation.

(2) Become a connoisseur. Almost nothing elicits more interest than genuine expertise. If someone is drawn to a topic that you’re knowledgeable about, you’ll move to the top of their list. Since publishing my books, I’ve had innumerable colleagues seek me out to get advice about finding an agent or fine-tuning their manuscripts.

But sometimes it’s even better when your expertise is outside the fold of your profession. Richard, a financial journalist I profiled in my book Reinventing You, was able to build better and deeper relationships with his sources after he started to write part-time about food and wine. He discovered that his Wall Street contacts would proactively call him up to get information about hot new restaurants or the best places to entertain their clients.

You can also use nontraditional expertise to build multidimensional connections. Bill Gates and Warren Buffett could certainly have a decent conversation about business. But it’s their expert-level seriousness about the card game bridge that cemented their bond, eventually leading to Buffett’s decision to entrust billions to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

When you’re an expert in a given niche, you can often connect on a level playing field with people who, under other circumstances, might be out of reach. One friend of mine, a corporate executive who produces jazz records on the side, recently got invited to the home of an internationally famous rock star as Grammy campaign season heated up.

If you know a lot about wine, or nutrition, or salsa dancing, or email marketing, or any of a million other subjects, people who care about that topic are sure to be interested in what you have to say.

(3) Become the center of the network. It’s not easy to build a high-powered network if you’re not already powerful. But New York City resident Jon Levy took the position that the best way to get invited to the party is to host the party. Nearly six years ago, he started hosting twice-monthly “Influencers” dinner gatherings, featuring luminaries in different fields. Levy’s gatherings now attract a guest roster of Nobel laureates and Olympic athletes. But he certainly didn’t start there.

Begin by inviting the most interesting professionals you know and asking them to recommend the most interesting people they know, and over time you can build a substantial network. At a certain point you’ll gain enough momentum that professionals who have heard about the dinners will even reach out to ask for an invitation. As Levy joked to one publication, “One day, I hope to accomplish something worthy of an invite to my own dinner.” When you’re the host, pulling together a great event liberates you to invite successful people who you might not normally consider your peers but who embrace the chance to network with other high-quality professionals.

I’ve also hosted more than two dozen dinner parties to broaden my network and meet interesting people. But that’s certainly not the only way to connect. These days, any professional who makes the effort to start a Meetup or Facebook group that brings people together could accomplish something similar.

The world is competing for the attention of the most successful people. If you want to meet them — and break through and build a lasting connection — the best strategy is to make them come to you. Identifying what’s uniquely interesting about you and becoming a connoisseur and a hub are techniques that will ensure you’re sought after by the people you’d most like to know.
networking  via:enochko  Communicating_&_Connecting  personal_accomplishments  connoisseurship  hubs  creating_valuable_content  idea_generation  content_creators  personal_branding  attention_spans  inbound  high-quality  expertise  think_threes  special_sauce  inflection_points 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Women Who Met Hillary, and Spotted a Future Political Star - The New York Times
DEC. 24, 2016 | NYT | By SUSAN DOMINUS.

Hilary Clinton started changing American political culture for women as far back as the early 1970s — not through a candidacy of her own, but through a series of small, but crucial, networking moves.

The number of women who laboured in basement meetings, in consciousness-raising groups, in boardrooms, in unions, in news organizations and in their own kitchens to expand possibilities for women are far too many to count....Prominent among those who did were a few key friends of Mrs. Clinton whom she helped find paths to the cause, including a Texan political player named Betsey Wright....I’m ushered in to the National League of Women Voters headquarters, and Hillary tells them, ‘This can be your youth director.’”

Ms. Piercy, representing the league, went on to attend the Republican and Democratic conventions in 1972, a key inflection point for female activists. “We realized that the only way we could be accepted as equals was to be in office,” she said. “But the parties were not interested in cultivating women. So we realized we would have to train them ourselves.”...while Mrs. Clinton was a law student supporting the presidential candidate Senator George McGovern in San Antonio, she met Ms. Wright, the person she thought could galvanize and prepare potential female candidates.....Ms. Wright had previously worked on individual women’s campaigns. Yet it was Mrs. Clinton who suggested that Ms. Wright move to Washington to spread her expertise, by joining Ms. Piercy and Ms. Griffith to work for what would become known as the National Women’s Education Fund, an unofficial training arm of the National Women’s Political Caucus, with no formal affiliation. “Hillary was saying they really did need to get somebody who understood local races,” Ms. Wright said. “And she strongly urged me to go.”....Wright created seminars and training sessions that taught women how to maneuver within the political process.

She also formed a powerful partnership with Ruth Mandel, who had recently created the pioneering Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. It was not just that they needed to train women, Ms. Mandel said; they needed to “help women overcome their own resistance to gaining political power in their own right.”...Wright knew that revolutions start with pragmatics: She created a training manual that the Education Fund and the Political Caucus relied on heavily for years, a guidebook that broke down the logistics of opinion polling, reaching the news media and recruiting a staff. The training sessions offered advice on every aspect of campaigning, including details specific to women.
Hillary_Clinton  politics  political_campaigns  discipline  political_infrastructure  grassroots  institutions  politicians  institution-building  women  networking  training  consciousness-raising  inflection_points 
january 2017 by jerryking
Sree Sreenivasan: The Met ousted one of its top executives, so he used Facebook to show them what they lost — Quartz
June 23, 2016 | QUARTZ| Jenni Avins

(1) Build your network before you need it.“You need an incredible support group, and people who understand.” said Sreenivasan. “You have to build it when you don’t need it.” keep your resumé and LinkedIn profile fresh, maintain your professional contacts, and be generous with your time and advice. “Join LinkedIn today, when you don’t need a job,” said Sreenivasan. “Desperation does not work on LinkedIn.”
(2) Go public as soon as you can. Sreenivasan realized that at his level, offers wouldn’t immediately pile up—especially in the summer. So the same day the Met sent a company-wide memo about Sreenivasan’s departure, he went ahead and posted the aforementioned note on Facebook. be open and free. See what happens. Let the universe help.’”
(3) It’s okay to be vulnerable. be willing to be vulnerable,” said Jarvis. “And you have to trust your friends.”
(4) Control the narrative by setting it free. Sharing vulnerability doesn’t necessarily worsen it, Jarvis explained. Quite the contrary: The benefits of sharing—and thereby controlling—one’s own story far outweigh the risks
(5) Be open to meetings and advice. “I’m meeting everybody,” said Sreenivasan. (Indeed, when I asked him if we could take a walk to discuss his strategy on a Monday afternoon, he was booked through the evening; hence our morning commute through the park.) There’s no shame in taking tons of meetings—especially when one’s calendar is suddenly open. You never know which one might lead somewhere.
Sree_Sreenivasan  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  companywide  lessons_learned  digital_media  museums  meetings  networking  vulnerabilities  narratives 
december 2016 by jerryking
Getting past ageism and back to work after a late job loss - The Globe and Mail
CAMILLA CORNELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015

.................networking with your own contacts first. “The people who know you understand your talents and what you’re capable of,” he says. “It’s much better than being just another résumé on a desk, where the manager thinks, ‘Oh my gosh, he has 30 years’ experience. He’s probably deader than a doornail.’”.....don’t rule out employment with smaller companies. “The jobs have greater scope, so they’re interesting,” he says. “And because they have greater scope, those companies need to hire people who are experienced. They can’t hire a young buck because he won’t be able to handle everything that needs to happen in that job.”.......The key message for mature job-seekers, says Mr. Richter: Don’t lose faith. “Keep trying and be secure in the fact that you do have a good track record and a well-developed set of skills,” he says. “You do have something to contribute.”..
aging  retirement  Second_Acts  entrepreneurship  ageism  midlife  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  small_business  networking 
may 2016 by jerryking
How Not to Be a Networking Leech: Tips for Seeking Professional Advice - The New York Times
SEPT. 26, 2015 | NYT | By MARGARET MORFORD.

(1) Make the meeting convenient. Ask for time frames that would work well, and meet at a place that is convenient for them, even if you have to drive across town.
(2) Buy their coffee or meal.
(3) Go with a prepared list of questions. People whose advice is worth seeking are busy.
(4) Don’t argue about their advice or point out why it wouldn’t work for you. You can ask for clarification by finding out how they would handle a particular concern you have, but don’t go beyond that. You get to decide whether or not to use their advice.
(5) Don’t ask for intellectual property or materials.
(6) Never ask for any written follow-up. It is your job to take good notes during your meeting, not their job to send you bullet points after the meeting. No one should get homework after agreeing to help someone.
(7) Spend time at the end of the meeting finding out what you can do for them.
(8) Always thank them more than once. Follow up with a handwritten note — not an email or a text.
(9) Do not refer others to the same expert.
(10) Ask an expert for free help only once. If the help someone offered you was so valuable that you would like them to provide it again, then pay for it the next time.
(11) As you ask people for help, always consider how you in turn can help others.
best_of  tips  torchbearers  networking  questions  gratitude  serving_others  note_taking  mentoring  advice  handwritten  leeches  brevity 
september 2015 by jerryking
To Get a Job in Your 50s, Maintain Friendships in Your 40s - The New York Times
SEPT. 26, 2015 | NYT | By PHYLLIS KORKKI.

in the job search process, the number of connections we maintain in our professional and personal networks is often critical.

As people age, they also tend to stay in the same job longer, consistent with a pattern of wanting to put down roots. During that time, the skills people have learned and the job search strategies they once used may become outdated — especially as technology evolves ever more quickly.

The cure for these drawbacks is fairly straightforward. Once you hit your early 40s, even if you are not looking for a job, work to learn new skills and stretch yourself, Professor Wanberg said. Also, keep your networks strong by staying in touch with former colleagues and classmates, along with current co-workers and clients whom you don’t see regularly, she said.
job_search  friendships  networking  aging  midlife  howto  co-workers 
september 2015 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
A fighter for immigration, inclusion and diversity - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015,

After years of running the poverty-fighting Maytree Foundation, last fall Ratna Omidvar was named head of the new Global Diversity Exchange housed at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto’s Ryerson University. The GDX, as she calls it, will do research and exchange information about diversity and the inclusion of immigrants and visible minorities – not just in Canada but all over the world.

It is essentially a “think-and-do tank,”...the GDX will tap into the great minds who have studied immigration and settlement, while sharing concrete strategies and experiences that have worked effectively.

While national governments function as the gatekeepers for immigration – letting people in or keeping them out – it is local efforts, usually at the city level, that make the difference in getting immigrants to prosper, she said.
immigration  women  diversity  Ryerson  leaders  immigrants  leadership  networking  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Maytree  talent_pipelines  under-representation  Ratna_Omidvar  Toronto  cities  think_tanks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Skills in Flux - NYTimes.com
MARCH 17, 2015| NYT |David Brooks.

As the economy changes, the skills required to thrive in it change, too, and it takes a while before these new skills are defined and acknowledged.

For example, in today’s loosely networked world, people with social courage have amazing value. Everyone goes to conferences and meets people, but some people invite six people to lunch afterward and follow up with four carefully tended friendships forevermore. Then they spend their lives connecting people across networks.

People with social courage are extroverted in issuing invitations but introverted in conversation — willing to listen 70 percent of the time.
David_Brooks  skills  networking  social_courage  Communicating_&_Connecting  conferences  sense-making  indispensable  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  following_up 
march 2015 by jerryking
Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business | None | Nu U Consulting
24/06/09

Jonathan Weber writes in Slate’s The Big Money: Making Payroll feature in a piece titled, “Know When to Fold”: “Failure is not something an entrepreneur can give in to very readily. A certain level of blind optimism—even in the face of long odds—is often necessary to build a successful product or company. If you, as the business owner, don't believe, you can be pretty sure your employees, customers, and shareholders won't, either… don't give in easily if you feel the passion… Sometimes you have to take the view that failure simply isn't an option.”
tips  economic_downturn  small_business  strategies  networking  value_propositions 
march 2015 by jerryking
The network effect
Jan 19th, 2015 | Comments to article in the Economist by guest-smamejj.

Networking is not a one off event. All the best networkers work hard at two things.

1. Building a broad network of qualit...
networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  network_effects  listening  questions  attentiveness 
january 2015 by jerryking
The network effect
Shamelessness, schmoozing, brown-nosing, calculating, ruthless, shameless (again)…one gets the impression that Schumpeter’s attempts at networking have not been so successful!

Jan 16th,2015| de...
letters_to_the_editor  friendships  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  network_effects  shamelessness 
january 2015 by jerryking
Schumpeter: The network effect
Jan 17th 2015 | The Economist| Anonymous.

How does one make the most of a networking opportunity, whether it is in a charming village in the Swiss Alps or in the conference hall of a soulless hotel next to a motorway? The first principle for would-be networkers is to abandon all shame. Be flagrant in your pursuit of the powerful and the soon-to-be-powerful, and when you have their attention, praise them to the skies...But shamelessness needs to be balanced with subtlety. Pretend to disagree with your interlocutor before coming around to his point of view; that gives him a sense of mastery. Discover similar interests or experiences. Go out of your way to ask for help. Lending a helping hand allows a powerful person to exercise his power while also burnishing his self-esteem....The second principle is that you must have something to say. Success comes from having a well-stocked mind, not just a well-thumbed Rolodex....Go to the main sessions and ask sensible questions. Reward the self-styled “thought leaders” in each session by adding them to your Twitter “follow” list....The third principle is that you need to work hard at networking. Swot up in advance on the most important people who will be at an event. If you manage to meet them, follow up with an e-mail and a suggestion to meet again...successful networkers must be calculating, ruthless and shameless, they do better when they somehow make it all seem spontaneous, accidental even (Sprezzaturra)...One of the best guidebooks on this subject, by Keith Ferrazzi, is called “Never Eat Alone”.
howto  Communicating_&_Connecting  networking  shamelessness  Davos  conferences  preparation  WEF_Davos  WEF  books  Keith_Ferrazzi  asking_for_help  first_principle  disagreements  soulless 
january 2015 by jerryking
31 Fantastic Pieces Of Advice For Surviving Your First Year On Wall Street
FINANCE More: Wall Street Features Advice


25/32
Don't forget your manners when networking... even on LinkedIn.

“Networking is not calling someone when you need help. I never accept Li...
LinkedIn  networking  etiquette  Wall_Street  advice 
september 2014 by jerryking
This Man's Job: Make Bill Gates Richer - WSJ
By ANUPREETA DAS and CRAIG KARMIN CONNECT
Sept. 18, 2014

Surprisingly, Mr. Gates has few technology-related investments. As of June 30, he held a 3.6% stake in Microsoft, worth about $13.9 billion based on Thursday's closing stock price.

Mr. Gates makes his own tech and biotech investments, which aren't held by Cascade. He started digital-image company Corbis Corp. in 1989. Smaller investments include stakes in nuclear-reactor developer TerraPower LLC and meat-substitute maker Beyond Meat.

Mr. Gates is updated on all the other investments every other month. "At the end of the day, all decisions go through Michael," says Mike Jackson, chairman and CEO of AutoNation, who considers Mr. Larson a friend. Mr. Larson is a director of the auto retailer, and Cascade owns a 14% stake in AutoNation valued at about $841 million.

Mr. Gates decided to hire Mr. Larson after the Journal reported in 1993 that the entrepreneur's money manager at the time had previously been convicted of bank fraud. ....After an extensive screening process, a recruiter invited Mr. Larson to meet Mr. Gates. The money manager had worked for a mergers-and-acquisitions firm and run bond funds for Putnam Investments, now a subsidiary of Canadian insurer Great-West Lifeco , Inc., before striking out on his own.
billgates  high_net_worth  money_management  AutoNation  family_office  wealth_management  real_estate  investing  personal_relationships  networking 
september 2014 by jerryking
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions - FT.com
August 25, 2014 | FT | By Lucy Kellaway.
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions.

1. Trust is vital . . .
2. Consumers are sometimes irrational
3 . . . and sometimes dead sensible
4. Jargon and hyperbole subtract value
5. Spelling matters
6. Accentuate warts
7. Arbitrage opportunities are plentiful
8. Do something you love
9. Study the data
10. The human touch is vital
11 Innovation is overrated
12. Tell stories
What they don’t teach you at eBay Business School . . .
. . . is how to network.
eBay  lessons_learned  Lucy_Kellaway  jargon  auctions  networking  trustworthiness  storytelling  irrationality  spelling  arbitrage 
august 2014 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview: Job Hunting in the Network Age - WSJ
By ANDY KESSLER
July 18, 2014 | WSJ |

Reid Hoffman has a theory on what makes ventures work: understanding that information is no longer isolated but instantly connected to everything else. Call it the move from the information age to the network age. Mr. Hoffman thinks that the transformation is just getting started and will take out anyone who stands in the way.

But what is a network? It's an identity, he explains, and how that identity interacts with others through communications and transactions. It's not just online, on Facebook and Twitter, but everywhere. It is the sum of those communications, conversations and interactions.

"Your identity is now constituted by the network," he says. "You are your friends, you are your tribe, you are your interactions with your colleagues, your customers, even your competitors. All those things come to form what your reputation is." In short, you are no longer the only one in control of your résumé...Mr. Hoffman had his own idea for a personal information managers (PIM) concept, but raising money proved tough. He got his first taste of venture capitalists in 1994 when he tried to find funding: "You probably should go learn how to launch software," potential investors told him.

So Mr. Hoffman joined Apple......Mr. Hoffman thinks that corporations still haven't figured out how to use LinkedIn and other platforms to their advantage. "All companies are being affected by globalization. All companies are being affected by technology disruption. Which means the innovation and adaptation cycles are getting shorter and shorter." How do you make your company more adaptive? "The answer is you need adaptive people working for you. It's much better for the company and much better for the employees—it accomplishes a network effect,"

Finding these adaptive employees is one thing, keeping them is another. LinkedIn forces companies to work at that.
Reid_Hoffman  Andy_Kessler  Silicon_Valley  LinkedIn  job_search  networks  résumés  accelerated_lifecycles  Communicating_&_Connecting  networking  network_effects  adaptability  reputation  learning_agility  retention  innovation_cycles 
july 2014 by jerryking
5 Things Super Lucky People Do
Mar 17, 2014 | Inc. Magazine | BY Kevin Daum.

1. Play to your strengths. So much time and energy is wasted trying to do things you probably don't do very well. Author and Inc. columnist Lewis Schiff learned from his survey of incredibly wealthy people that they got that way by focusing only on what they do best. Everything else you can delegate, or you could find a partner to compensate for your weaknesses. That way, you will shine where you excel and attract opportunity. Good things come to those who emanate success.

2. Prepare in advance. Unlucky people often get that way because they're reactive and unprepared for whatever comes. People who have stored food and water in their basements aren't lucky to find themselves prepared when disaster strikes, they used forethought to make sure they had what they might need just in case. I personally scoff at this horrible recent trend of disparaging business plans because things change constantly. The point of a business plan isn't to follow it no matter what, it's to establish a structure for smart decision making that allows you to succeed no matter what the future might bring.

3. Start early. Some people seem to have more hours in the day. I myself don't need more than six hours of sleep and am constantly finding ways to be more efficient. I use that extra time to start my projects well in advance. My rewards aren't dependent upon the time of day that I take action. (This column is being written at 3 a.m.) But it does matter that I'm beginning to explore projects I expect to complete months or years from now. So many people only want to put their energy into things that provide immediate gratification. The most fortunate people I know are the ones who planted seeds early and now reap that harvest of happiness.

4. Connect with as many people as possible. The key to success is access to opportunity. Access comes from influence. If you're influential, people will come and bring opportunities to you. The bigger your following, the more powerful your influence. The only way to build a big following is to provide value to many people. You have to provide the sort of value that will cause people to spread your thoughts far and wide, attributing credit to you when they do. Are you creating that kind of value? If not, figure how you can.

5. Follow up. Opportunities often come and go because people don't respond in a timely manner. I'm always amazed when people ask me for something and I respond only to never hear from them again. Three months ago, a young woman asked me if I hire interns or assistants. I replied immediately saying I'm always willing to consider hiring people who bring value to my work. I asked her how she thought she could enhance what I could do. I never heard from her again. Perhaps she now considers herself unlucky that opportunity doesn't come her way. I believe that following up is often more powerful and impressive than the act of initiating.
tips  luck  Communicating_&_Connecting  opportunities  JCK  focus  preparation  readiness  value_creation  networking  following_up  self-starters  overachievers  strengths  affirmations  forethought  weaknesses  individual_initiative  unprepared  chance  contingency  partnerships  high-achieving  early_risers 
march 2014 by jerryking
Three Mistakes to Avoid When Networking
February 18, 2014 | HBR | by Dorie Clark |

Misunderstanding the pecking order.
Asking to receive before you give.
Failing to specifically state your value proposition.
networking  serving_others  HBR  value_propositions  misunderstandings 
february 2014 by jerryking
Apple Quietly Builds New Networks - WSJ.com
By
Drew FitzGerald and
Daisuke Wakabayashi
connect
Feb. 3, 2014

Apple's online delivery needs have grown in the last few years, driven by its iCloud service for storing users' data and rising sales of music, videos and games from iTunes and the App Store. But the iPhone maker is reported to have broader ambitions for television that could involve expanding its Apple TV product or building its own television set.

Snapping up Internet infrastructure supports all those pursuits at once. Apple is signing long-term deals to lock up bandwidth and hiring more networking experts, steps that companies like Google Inc. GOOG -4.03% and Facebook Inc. have already taken to gain more control over the vast content they distribute.

Bill Norton, chief strategy officer for International Internet Exchange, which helps companies line up Internet traffic agreements, estimates that Apple has in a short time bought enough bandwidth from Web carriers to move hundreds of gigabits of data each second....Apple's hardware business is increasingly tied into services delivered over the Internet. In 2011, it rolled out the iCloud service, which stores and syncs emails, documents, photos, music and video so users can access them from various Apple devices. In addition, it is delivering more content from its iTunes and App Store—which brought in $16 billion in revenue in the year that ended in September—while pushing out regular, data-laden updates of its mobile and PC operating systems.

The company's need for bandwidth and supporting infrastructure will grow if it moves further into television. Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook has said improving the TV viewing experience is an area of interest for the company and that it has a "great vision" for television. On a conference call last week to discuss its latest earnings with analysts, Mr. Cook said Apple is on track to break into new product categories this year, fueling speculation about a new television or revamped video service.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_TV  bandwidth  digital_storage  hiring  iCloud  iTunes  networks  networking  new_categories  services  streaming  Tim_Cook 
february 2014 by jerryking
Ten habits of the world’s best connection makers - The Globe and Mail
Scott Dinsmore

Young Entrepreneur Council

Published Friday, Jan. 10 2014,

1. Smile.
2. See friends, not strangers.
3. Make friends. This is the foundation. Making genuine connections is nothing more than making friends.
4. Be genuine. If you’re connecting just because you want to get yourself further up the ladder, then you’ve already lost. There is only one type of connection — one you genuinely care about.
5. Contribute. Meeting people is about making their lives better. Whether that’s by giving them a smile, a new job or anything in between — there is a way to help everyone. Give like crazy, embrace generosity and make others more successful.
6. Pay attention. The easiest way to be interesting is to be interested.
7. Make people a priority.
8. Be open to conversation.
9. Know who you are and who you want in your life.
10. Be uniquely YOU.
attention  authenticity  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  friendships  habits  networking  pay_attention  self-awareness  serving_others 
january 2014 by jerryking
Don't network, make contact
Feb. 11 2004 | The Globe and Mail | BARBARA MOSES.

Good networking is a two-way street. Skilled networkers don't think of themselves as networking but rather as exchanging information. Whenever someone tells me about a great networking experience they had, I ask them two questions. "What did you learn from them?" "What information did you pass on?"

In good networking there always is a mutual connection. Done well, networking is like the most graceful dancing. Both parties are stimulated by the interaction. No one feels used. At its best, there is a deeply satisfying emotional and intellectual connection. Done poorly, nothing is more off-putting.

Good networkers are "wired," with broad connections that range beyond their own professional boundaries and into all walks of life. They cultivate relationships with people who know how to get things done. Like good mentors, they are genuinely curious about people and what they are thinking, and like to make things happen for others. They like to bring together interesting people and ideas -- and they are as proud of making things happen for others as they are of the number of names in their personal organizer.
networking  Barbara_Moses  serving_others  personal_connections  emotional_connections 
december 2013 by jerryking
Noel's Pitch Letter
steal elements of his note for your own purposes. Look at the way he helps you to recognize a 'Noel-solvable' problem. Look at the succinct way he conveys the unique 'Noel-selling-proposition'. He ma...
Noel_Desautels  Managing_Your_Career  networking  JCK  pitches  feedback  templates  value_propositions 
december 2013 by jerryking
Networking to grow your business
1. Build your ideal network
Identify who can provide introductions to the people you want to meet, whether it’s potential clients, investors or employees. Meeting people in professional settings, such as conferences or trade shows, or even getting to know the suppliers, clients or competitors of your target clients will help you build your ideal network. Don’t be afraid to ask for introductions.

2. Create a networking strategy
Develop an action plan to connect with each person on your list. Leverage existing networks, acquaintances and events. Social media tools, such es LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, are also powerful marketing tools that all; ggoeliont way to tap into broad social circles and establish a strong network.

3. Nurture and deepen your relationships
Prioritize the relationships that are most important for your business goals and manage your relationships to get the most benefit. Follow up and solidify your relationships by - 1 W * “J staying in touch on a regular basis over an extended period of time. A smaller network of high value contacts may serve you better than a larger network. Ensure that you are getting value by tracking your activities and the results they produce.

For more information, visit cibc.com/smallbusinessgrowth.
networking  howto  social_media  relationships  LinkedIn  conferences  action_plans  following_up 
december 2013 by jerryking
Eight Tips for Being a Smart Protégé at Work - WSJ.com
August 17, 2009 | WSJ |By Dawn E. Chandler, Douglas T. Hall and Kathy E. Kram
mentoring  movingonup  networking  managing_up  protégés 
november 2013 by jerryking
Taking the cons out of conferences
14 Mar 2007 | The Globe and Mail pg. C.3. | Harvey Schachter.

Review of Seven Rules For Designing More Innovative Conferences By Ed Bernacki
The Idea Factory, 82 pages, $34

If you think back...
conferences  ideaCity  book_reviews  Harvey_Schachter  networking 
august 2013 by jerryking
Is the Black church in the Black community?
July 31 2013| Share News | Posted by Lennox Farrell.
Does Toronto’s Black community have any organizational base from which to respond to our social needs?

Which, in particular brings me back to the initial question, is there any institution in our community with the resources and the legitimacy to step up and step forward?

An institution assisting in developing leadership that consults. Leadership that embraces. Leadership that is forthright with the politicians and those who carry status?

Leadership that speaks with the institutional knowledge of what is past and who is present. Leadership that speaks to solutions and not to posturings. Because, if Toronto knows anything, it knows how to make a fig-leaf look like a fig-tree. It knows how to tire you out, calling meetings to call other meetings…

We live in a city and in a time that is at a watershed regarding racism and its impact on our youth. Employment and self-employment require training and resources, yes. These require even more: access and opportunity. In other words, these require a level playing field. Because access and opportunity is not about what you know, but about who you know; with whom you socialize in your church, club, family, golf-course, neighbourhood.

The only effective response to this (anti-Black racism) must come from institutions that are communal, that are resourced, legitimate, and have the wisdom and honour to unite, not divide the community from religious turf wars for paying memberships. Our community and our youth in particular, need back-up from the front.

What we urgently need is for individuals in leadership to be energized. What we need and before the next elections – municipal, provincial, federal – is greater and more substantive interaction with the most marginalized among us; with communities who might never attend church; who will not be in the choir; who might not give donations. Then, call together as many of the organizations and individuals who will volunteer to work and to work wisely under honourable leadership.
African_Canadians  institutional_knowledge  leadership  leadership_development  institutions  institution-building  networking  SIU  strategic_thinking  Toronto  turning_points 
august 2013 by jerryking
How to Get on a Board, by Frontier Communications CEO Maggie Wilderotter -
April 11, 2013 | Businessweek | Maggie Wilderotter.

If you want to be on boards, you have to fish where the fish are. That means getting to know CEOs and others who are board members. I was 28 and vice president of sales at a small vendor to cable companies when I decided to try to get elected to the board of the National Cable Television Association.

Be active. Write newsletters,befriend CEOs.
Network!! Spend time with people to find out what makes them tick. Go to dinner so they get to know me as a person, not just another director, and we’ll talk about our families and interests outside of work. If I find out someone loves race cars, maybe I’ll send him a card about some race car event, with a note saying “you might love this.” Building these relationships takes time, sometimes years, so you have to be patient and keep working at it.
howto  boards_&_directors_&_governance  women  CATV  Carol_Hymowitz  networking 
july 2013 by jerryking
Should I Accept that LinkedIn Invitation? - Alexandra Samuel -
June 25, 2013 | Harvard Business Review | by Alexandra Samuel.

the answer to the who-should-I-connect-to-on-LinkedIn question is to use a "favor test." The favor test is simple: Would you do a favor for this person, or ask a favor of them? If so, make the connection. If not, take a pass. VERSUS

an attitude that "It's not about a rule. It's much more about your feeling and beeing. I can accept that Ln invitation just because of a relevant profile; just because of chasing curiosity at moment of reading; just because of why not, he/she has low connections; just because he/she could open gates never expected; just because this is life: sliding doors."
etiquette  LinkedIn  HBR  social_networking  networking 
june 2013 by jerryking
Power brokers replace complainers in women’s networks - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 21 2013

“The success of a person’s career substantially depends on the strength of her network,” Ms. Gagnon asserted. “After expertise and hard work, the ability to build relationships is the third prerequisite for professional success and the higher you move up, the more crucial it becomes.”
women  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  hard_work  power_brokers  industry_expertise 
june 2013 by jerryking
The real way to network at a conference - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 16 2013 | G&M | by Harvey Schachter.

Want to meet a lot of people at a conference? A powerful way is to ask a (sensible) question during a speaker event. When Vancouver consultant Darcy Rezac did that at a Singapore conference, the friendliness and approachability of others afterward indicated he had unexpectedly introduced himself to 600 people.
Harvey_Schachter  conferences  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  howto  work_ethic 
june 2013 by jerryking
TED2012 and Why conferences will never be the same | engineers don't blog
March 8, 2012

1. Perfect your speed pitch/introduction — a laser focus introduction of who you are, and why this person may be interested in connecting with you. I really thought I had a good speed pitch prior to TED. But the first day of TED, I attended a session of speed meetings. Each speed meeting was three minutes in duration. Each time I met someone, I learned how to adjust my pitch based on the questions people asked. I learned from their questions that there were certain things in my pitch that weren’t clear or didn’t convey the heart of my mission. It really took about an hour of speed meetings, before I felt as if my pitch was clear. During the second hour of speed meeting, I realized there weren’t nearly as many questions. I took this to mean that either my pitch was better, or people were just tired of meeting. Either way practice your speed pitch, and learn to adjust it based on the feedback you receive from of questions or reactions.

2. Attend a conference with a purpose — I find it helpful when conferences or events publish their list of attendees. Its worth it to do a little ‘research’ on those in attendance and make an effort to meet people of interest. Often the person of interest is not the ‘celebrity’ of the conference. But someone who may be more accessible, but you can still learn their experience and their connections. It also helps to set goals before attending a conference. What are you trying to accomplish from attending the conference? Be specific in your goals. ‘Meet people’ is not a specific goal, plus you can meet people at the supermarket. One of my goals from TED was to ‘Connect with developers working with Big Data.’

3. Be present in conversation and listen (i.e. living_in_the_moment)

4. Become a connector — Everyone you meet at a conference may not be in direct alignment with your current goals. However, networking in its purist form is actually just building a network. You become a node in the network and have the ability to connect others and align goals. Plus its just good networking karma.
TED  African-Americans  women  entrepreneur  conferences  productivity  howto  Communicating_&_Connecting  preparation  networking  goal-setting  living_in_the_moment  aligned_interests 
june 2013 by jerryking
How can I get the most out of attending TED in Long Beach?
Q: I've been fortunate enough to be able to attend TED in Long Beach this year (2013), and would love to hear from anyone who's gone before: how do I get the most out of it? Looking at the schedule, i...
TED  conferences  productivity  howto  goal-setting  Communicating_&_Connecting  networking 
june 2013 by jerryking
Never blow off the ones you'll need
27 Aug 2004 | The Globe and Mail pg. C.1. | James Gray,

We've all blown people off. After all, it often seems that there
are simply too many who want too much from us -- our business, our
expertise, our contacts -- offering negligible value in return.
However, if we choose to interact only with those who can benefit us
here and now, we're limiting ourselves, and possibly our careers...We
need to reach out. We need to connect. We need to engage....help others.
Return calls. alert others to suitable employment opportunities;
facilitate introductions. ...This achiever doesn't help others because
he's successful; he's successful because he helps others. ...Will some
take advantage of me? Absolutely. Should I care? No... Commit to
responding conscientiously to communication by following three simple
rules: Schedule your time: Prioritize your calls : Ask how you can help :
networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  serving_others 
june 2013 by jerryking
How Social Networks Drive Black Unemployment - NYTimes.com
May 5, 2013, 9:12 pm 774 Comments
How Social Networks Drive Black Unemployment
By NANCY DITOMASO

Help is not given to just anyone, nor is it available from everyone. Inequality reproduces itself because help is typically reserved for people who are “like me”: the people who live in my neighborhood, those who attend my church or school or those with whom I have worked in the past. It is only natural that when there are jobs to be had, people who know about them will tell the people who are close to them, those with whom they identify, and those who at some point can reciprocate the favor.

Because we still live largely segregated lives, such networking fosters categorical inequality: whites help other whites, especially when unemployment is high. Although people from every background may try to help their own, whites are more likely to hold the sorts of jobs that are protected from market competition, that pay a living wage and that have the potential to teach skills and allow for job training and advancement. So, just as opportunities are unequally distributed, they are also unequally redistributed.
social_networking  networking  African-Americans  unemployment  job_search  racial_disparities  nepotism 
may 2013 by jerryking
Do's and Don'ts for Wooing Angel Investors - WSJ.com
July 30, 2007 | WSJ By SIMONA COVEL
Do's and Don'ts for Wooing Angel Investors
angels  howto  pitches  Simona_Covel  networking  mentoring 
february 2013 by jerryking
Overcoming Setbacks Helps One Executive - WSJ.com
October 5, 1999 | WSJ | By CAROL HYMOWITZ

Surmounting Setbacks Helps Executive Win War
Carol_Hymowitz  bouncing_back  movingonup  women  CEOs  setbacks  firings  Managing_Your_Career  networking  IBM  Apple  Exodus 
february 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
Help yourself by helping others
?? | Globe & Mail | Lynda Taller-Wakter.

* Define your objectives, then find an organization that can help you achieve them. if fund raising is the skill you want to develop, target a bigger organization with canvassing and other related opportunities.
* Don’t dismiss the importance of volunteer work on a résumé.
* Volunteer, even if you don’t think you have the time.
* Volunteer work can build your esteem - an important stepping stone for getting back to work.
* Test your skills in the marketplace as soon as possible.
* Joining the right organizations can raise your profile at work.
* Network wisely
* Develop acumen in a new field. If career is behind your volunteering, supplement it: there are courses in such areas as fund raising and festivals management.
volunteering  Managing_Your_Career  business_acumen  résumés  expertise  job_search  tips  serving_others  networking  generosity 
december 2012 by jerryking
Joseph Goodell Knows the Pitfalls Of Corporate Life - WSJ.com
November 12, 1996 |WSJ| By HAL LANCASTER.

Lesson 3: Develop a plan for building your network of contacts and work on it constantly.

When the outplacement counselor asked Mr. Goodell for a list of business contacts, "I got a blank look on my face," he says. "It was something I had not paid any attention to."

He now keeps a log book, with names and addresses, how he met them, their likes, dislikes, spouses' names, etc. He recommends trade associations, professional groups, school alumni groups and conventions for contact-building and urges managers to "use all reasonable excuses to maintain those contacts," such as lunch, phone calls, notes and Christmas cards.
HBS  MIT  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  lessons_learned  networking  networks 
december 2012 by jerryking
New Year's Resolution 2002
1. Resolve to stay brutally optimistic.
2. Resolve to identify the most powerful benefit you offer to the people around you and then deliver it. (See below)
3. Resolve to pump up your personal vitality. How do I retain personal vitality?
[Personal vitality measures overall health in four key areas:
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Purpose – INTERESTING! (I believe that having a sense of individual life purpose is absolutely fundamental to personal happiness and contentment ]
4. Resolve to be habitually generous.
5. Resolve to go on a mental diet.
6. Resolve to be a global citizen, fully open to the cultures and influences of others.
7. Resolve to take control of your destiny.
8. Resolve to increase your human connectedness. Network.
9. Resolve to increase your creativity by letting go of the familiar. If innovation is everything, how do I institutionalize it in my personal life? Innovation ==> change strategy ==> succeed because they are subversive. Be a heretic!!!
10. Resolve to be you because others are already taken.

Practice adding value to things--ideas to make things worth more.
Practice adding value to people--what can I do to help my colleagues become more effective?
Practice adding value to myself--what can I do to make myself more valuable today?
inspiration  motivations  fitness  personal_energy  purpose  networking  creative_renewal  indispensable  serving_others  value_creation  resolutions  unconventional_thinking  JCK  affirmations  optimism  authenticity  generosity  Communicating_&_Connecting  subversion 
august 2012 by jerryking
Odds 'n Ends
January 15, 2001 | E-mail | by Owen Gordon.

I understand if you don‘t think it's worth the effort to Camp out and cold call - even though they seem to be developing enough of a concentration that U.S. VC's are setting up shop - but remotely monitoring Kanata to me would have meant chasing down a couple of locally-based service providers (HH's, lawyers, I-bankers, who operate in the space with their finger on the pulse or Denzil Doyle or a friend of one of your college buddies who works in industry down there or the Ottawa organizer of First Tuesdays or the TVG equivalent or the officer at the tech transfer office of U of O? Carleton? at least a ñfteen minute chat with some of the Ottawa-based correspondents from SVN on who would be a good source, etc. l Know it seems extremely ineftioient to you not to be able pour through a yellow-page listing with your exact criteria but you'd really be surprised at the randomness and uneveness of going through people. You start sniffing around and spreading the word for what you‘re looking for and you never know when you‘re just one introduction, one conversation away from the Sirois', Pacquins and Matthews of the world. After all, Canada ain't that big.
Owen_Gordon  advice  Managing_Your_Career  networking  randomness  Ottawa 
august 2012 by jerryking
Hate Small Talk? These 5 Questions Will Help You Work Any Room
07-27-2012 | Fast Company | BY Allison Graham.

Questions to get the conversations flowing:

"What’s your connection to the event?"

"What’s keeping you busy when you’re not at events like this or at work?" .

"Are you getting away this summer?"

"Are you working on any charity initiatives?"

"How did you come to be in your line of work?"
ice-breakers  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  networking  small_talk 
july 2012 by jerryking
Finding contract work
06/04/01 | Network World | By John Rossheim.
management_consulting  networking 
july 2012 by jerryking
JCK Must Network More!
February 14, 2002 | Owen Gordon
Your last comment notwithstanding, the biggest disadvantage that independents like you have in this day and age is no longer technology faxes, emails, etc.) nor scale: it's reach.You were not afforded the luxury of having a high profile middle to senior management position as your precipice from which to launch into independent consulting from. Therefore, you need formal mechanisms that allow you to “work a room" and eloquent yourself with, oh I don't know. say. 10 new people a month. They're not always going to be key (sorry you didn't run into 10 people who know Medical Transcription cold) but if you keep in peripheral contact, it grows over time. Remember, a whole lot of people who might be useful now lawyers, people who know people with money. people with connected into health-care}, you might have simply ignored 2 years ago if you went to TVG with your Telecom blinders on.
The key to your future success is not about Jerry King in a room with the light bulb going off on the greatest mousetrap or business model or process or strategy that no one else thought of. Regardless of the amount of empirical primary research you do in your room, the odds of you zigging when everyone else zagging is remote. And it's even remoter that you are going to have all the wherewith all and resources to execute from Lyons Ht. Road. The key is people. in fast, someone with half your brains and business sense and no formal post-graduate education might have an easier time getting one of your proposals off of the ground just based on the network effect and the six degrees of separation/Kevin Bacon rule. If TVG isn't offering up those people then fine. But make dog gone sure that you have a suitable replacement that offers the scope and diversity of players under one roof. To hell with the quality of the keynote speakers address.
OG
p.s. if your Carecore thing is starting to move, why don't you form a small board of advisors comprised of people who's judgment you trust - net only w.r.t. the business model but people with judgment who've acted as career coaches for you like Snelgrove, etc. You'd use these people to vet all kind of ideas. "How do i get the first meeting with the top dog at that hospital in Buffalo." "Do I incorporate a separate entity from Carecor and if so, what should I look for. what should be the share ownership structure?" "What are the next hurdles, roadblocks-as that I can expect 3 months from now and how do I begin to anticipate them?
JCK  networking  management_consulting  Owen_Gordon  associations  business_development 
july 2012 by jerryking
Kick-Start Your Career
August 15 2006 | Fortune | By Anne Fisher.

The era of tedious dues-paying to earn career advancement is long gone and, for the cohort who grew up during the have-it-all Eighties and joined the workforce in the go-go late '90s, waiting around for a chance to move up is just maddening.

If that describes you, two words: Don't wait.

"If you're in middle management at any age, but especially in your 30s, you have a big decision to make. Do you really want to break into the senior echelons?," asks Phylis Esposito. "If so, you have to find a way to stand out. You have to get more visible, which usually means taking a risk - sometimes a big risk. It's tough, because you may even have to put everything you've already earned on the line in order to do it."

You need a strong network of friends and allies, too. We've all heard and read plenty by now about the importance of networking, although it is one of those notions that often seems honored in the breach. Consider a recent survey of 1,805 managers by ExecuNet, an online career-services firm: 84 percent of those polled said they believe a broad network of personal and professional contacts is essential for success in business. Yet only 19 percent said their own networks are in "good" or "excellent" shape.
movingonup  risks  Managing_Your_Career  risk-taking  networking  networks  jump-start 
march 2012 by jerryking
Book Summary: Effective Networking for Professional Success - Management Portal
This article is based on the following book:
Effective Networking for Professional Success
"How to Make the Most of Your Personal Contacts"
by Rupert Hart, Stirling Books, 1997
networking  tips  rules_of_the_game 
march 2012 by jerryking
Managing Your Career: Job-Hunt Workshops - WSJ.com
February 1, 2005 | WSJ | By JOANN S. LUBLIN

Among the other clever tips that were provided during the workshop:

Send introductory "cover letters" via Federal Express. Save your resume for later.
Find "connectors," such as hairstylists, dentists and accountants, who know many people because their professions cut across industries.
During networking events, wear a name tag on your chest's right side so someone shaking hands can easily discern who you are. Tuck spare business cards behind the tag.
Identify an industry's key players through trade publications that quote them. Cite the articles when you solicit their advice.
Craft an "elevator pitch" about yourself that sounds like a dramatic movie trailer because it captures your passion.
Prepare a script before phoning a hiring manager. Call while standing. Leave voicemail slowly, using an upward inflection to demonstrate your energy and enthusiasm.
Send personalized, handwritten notes thanking every individual who interviews you
Managing_Your_Career  Joann_S._Lublin  Colleges_&_Universities  job_search  networking  preparation 
march 2012 by jerryking
Tongue-Tied When Networking? - WSJ.com
June 6, 2006 | WSJ | By PERRI CAPELL.

Question: Most advice on networking doesn't say what I should talk about with people I contact. Do people just call each other up and say, "Hi, how are things going these days?" Please provide some input on this.

Answer: relationships are easiest to develop when you have something in common with the other person. Find commonalities that you can build on before you meet or pick up the telephone. You may know some of the same people or you may be in the same professional organization. Then send a written note or an email to the person about why you'd like to meet, or ask your mutual friend to make an introduction, says Ms. Wier. When you do connect, you'll have a foundation for your conversation. "People get tongue-tied when there is no basis for a relationship," she says.

You may not get job leads, referrals or other help you want in the beginning. As with any good relationship, the rewards usually come later on. Just be genuine and focus on how you can help the other party. "People have very unrealistic expectations of networking," says Diane Darling, a communications trainer and author in Boston....
start conversations by asking the other person questions about him or herself...If you're attending a party and don't know anyone, ask people how they know the host or how long they've lived in town. looking for a job."
ice-breakers  conversations  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2012 by jerryking
Managing Your Career: Overseas Job Hopping - WSJ.com
June 7, 2005

Job Hopping Overseas Can Enhance a Career, But It Takes Fortitude

Switching continents to switch jobs can enhance your career. Bilingual global managers "are going to be more and more in demand," predicts Kyung Yoon, a vice chairman of search firm Heidrick & Struggles International. "But the learning curve is very high if you've never lived in that target country before."

Despite multiple obstacles, you can snare a cross-continental offer without losing your sanity or your wallet. Specialized skills can give you an edge at lower levels.

By JOANN S. LUBLIN
Joann_S._Lublin  Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  overseas_assignments  networking  managers  learning_curves  Heidrick_&_Struggles  bilingualism 
march 2012 by jerryking
Networking - a full time activity
July 8, 2008

Successful people stay in touch. They stay in touch not just with people who can do things for them, but also with people who they can do things for and with people who are just nice to know. Networking shouldn’t be something you do when you want something, but also when you are in a position to give something
networking  social_networking  howto  blogs 
march 2012 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read