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jerryking : new_graduates   80

Dear Grads: How to Slay Dragons in the Business World
May 20, 2019 | WSJ | by Andy Kessler.

here’s my simple advice: Be a hero. You’ll have a job with a vague description. Sales. Physician assistant. Manager. Business intelligence. Everyone comes in with a task. Don’t let your job description be a straitjacket. Do something above and beyond. That’s what your employers want, whether they admit it or not.

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I’ve seen it again and again. I heard from a woman named Carol working in international marketing for a Midwest company. She was asked by a superior working on a board deck for a list of European competitors. She came up with a single PowerPoint slide that visually showed the reach of each competitor overlaid with her company’s distributors and analysis of how it could best compete. The slide was a huge hit. The chief operating officer thanked her. She got a raise and more responsibilities.

On Wall Street, I used to work with a salesman named Steve. A deal to raise money for a paper company was stuck. No one would touch it at $20. It was uglier than Dunder Mifflin. Steve had a new account in Milwaukee and insisted it buy several million shares, but at $18. On hearing someone was willing to buy, other accounts piled in. Steve is still known as the guy who got the ugly deal done—a hero.

Then there’s the coder, Paul. There were long discussions about how his company might get paid for its web service, but no solutions. “On a Friday,” Paul recalls, he sat down and invented one. “It seemed like an interesting problem, so one evening I implemented this content-targeting system, just as a sort of side project, not because I was supposed to.” What became known as AdSense morphed into a $115 billion business. Paul Buchheit was employee No. 23 at Google. He also developed Gmail. Giga-hero.

You don’t have to save a baby from a fire. In Silicon Valley there’s a saying about pain killers versus vitamins: Either save costs or generate revenue. You can be a hero either way.

Another easy route to heroism: Every company has particularly nasty clients. They don’t return calls and they badmouth your products. Everyone avoids them. Instead, go for it. Roll up your sleeves and find something you have in common with them. Better yet, find their weakness. Horse racing. Wilco. Anime. You’ll own them.
advice  Andy_Kessler  Colleges_&_Universities  commencement  first90days  howto  new_graduates  painkillers  pain_points  speeches  Steve_Jobs  vitamins 
july 2019 by jerryking
The winner’s wisdom of Silicon Valley Stoics
MAY 31, 2019 | Financial Times | Janan Ganesh.

An idea that works for an established winner can be utterly ruinous for a mere aspirant.....In common parlance, Stoicism used to mean nothing more specific than a kind of grin-and-bear-it fortitude......The new Stoicism calls for — and here I paraphrase — a virtuous rather than joy-centred life. It often takes the guise of self-denial.............the worst of it is the deception of those who are just starting out in life. Unless “22 Stoic Truth-Bombs From Marcus Aurelius That Will Make You Unf***withable” is pitched at retirees, the internet crawls with bad Stoic advice for the young. The premise is that what answers to the needs of those in the 99th percentile of wealth and power is at all relevant to those trying to break out of, say, the 50th.
advice  cannabis  fads  Greek  Janan_Ganesh  natural_order  new_graduates  relevancy  self_denial  Silicon_Valley  stage_of_life  Stoics  virtues 
june 2019 by jerryking
Hedge funds fight back against tech in the war for talent
August 3, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Lindsay Fortado in London.

Like other industries competing for the top computer science talent, hedge funds are projecting an image that appeals to a new generation. The development is forcing a traditionally secretive industry into an unusual position: having to promote itself, and become cool.

The office revamp is all part of that plan, as hedge funds vie with technology companies for recruits who have expertise in machine learning, artificial intelligence and big data analytics, many of whom are garnering salaries of $150,000 or more straight out of university.

“A lot have gone down the Google route to offer more perks,” said Mr Roussanov, who works for the recruitment firm Selby Jennings in New York. “They’re trying to rebrand themselves as tech firms.”...While quantitative investing funds, which trade using computer algorithms, have been on the forefront of hiring these types of candidates, other hedge funds that rely on humans to make trading decisions are increasingly upping their quantitative capabilities in order to analyze reams of data faster.

The casual work atmosphere and flexible hours at tech firms such as Google have long been a strong draw, and hedge funds are making an effort to 'rebrand themselves' Besides the increasing amount of perks funds are trying to offer, like revamping their workplace and offering services such as free dry-cleaning, they are emphasizing the amount of money they are willing to spend on technology and the complexity of the problems in financial markets to entice recruits.

“The pitch is . . . this is a very data-rich environment, and it’s a phenomenally well-resourced environment,” said Matthew Granade, the chief market intelligence officer at Point72, Steve Cohen’s $13bn hedge fund.

For the people Mr Granade calls “data learning, quant types”, the harder the problem, the better. “The benefit for us is that the markets are one of the hardest problems in the world. You think you’ve found a solution and then everyone else catches up. The markets are always adapting. So you are constantly being presented with new challenges, and the problem is constantly getting harder.”
hedge_funds  recruiting  uWaterloo  war_for_talent  millennials  finance  perks  quantitative  hard_questions  new_graduates  data_scientists 
august 2018 by jerryking
My Advice to Grads: Start Mopping - WSJ
By Tyler Bonin
May 28, 2018

A mop, used for cleaning floors, isn’t a magical tool for success. Rather, it is a reminder that there should be no task considered beneath you.......I had plenty of practice in this area as a former Marine Corps private, so I always volunteered for the job......My managers noticed. They named me employee of the month and promoted me to management for the holiday rush—a small success at a small store. I learned that a sense of entitlement is a burden. ......I volunteered for the necessary task, signaling my work ethic and dedication to the organization.......A successful consultant told me that after graduating from a top-tier university, he spent a year piecing together tedious part-time jobs while volunteering at startups—only to prove himself. As competitive as the U.S. economy is, efforts like this are only becoming more common.....Certainly there is a time to be bold, but there is also a time for humility. A task once considered beneath you could actually be the key to your success. Do the job nobody wants, because, believe it or not, somebody appreciates it. Volunteer to learn and to provide value to others. Find a dream job by first doing the rote tasks in that field, without complaint. Pick up a mop
advice  cleaning  commencement  entitlements  humility  new_graduates  office_housework  speeches  USMC  volunteering  work_ethic  workplaces 
may 2018 by jerryking
Millennials shouldn’t treat their careers like lottery tickets - The Globe and Mail
MARCH 20, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | by BRAM BELZBERG.

If you're in your early 20s and just starting your career, you probably shouldn't take a job with a start-up.....joining a startup is attractive. They can be exciting, and the pay can be pretty good. A small percentage of people will pick the right opportunity, collect stock options, and become millionaires before they're 30. It's like winning the lottery.

But, like the real lottery, most people don't win, and they end up worse off than they were before....The majority of startups are going to go bust.....Large companies – such as banks and consulting firms and established tech outfits – understand how to bring along new graduates. They've been developing the best way to do so for decades. They have full-time employees who only think about developing young staff into future managers. Their programs work. They teach you important skills, they teach you how the professional world operates, and they teach you how to network. It takes a lot of time, energy, and focus to create these programs.....Generally, successful startups need three things: a great idea, a reliable funding network, and strong leadership. Most startups don't have a full management team, and the managers they do have probably won't have time to mentor you. You also won't be building a network of peers who can help finance your startup one day. If you have a great idea, it will still be there when you've learned how to develop it into a business. If you really want to get the experience of working at a startup, do it when you've developed your career and built a safety net in case it fails....Work hard, put in your time, and achieve your goals. But there aren't any shortcuts in building a career. When you're ready to move on from your first job, you should have a clear idea of what you want to do next, with a foundation of skills and experience in place. You don't want to be left holding only a losing lottery ticket.
millennials  Managing_Your_Career  Jason_Isaacs  career_paths  start_ups  large_companies  advice  new_graduates  high-risk 
march 2018 by jerryking
Merck C.E.O. Ken Frazier on Death Row Cases and the Corporate Soul - The New York Times
By David Gelles

March 9, 2018

How do you prioritize your time?

There are three things that the C.E.O. should be focused on. Number one is that sense of purpose and direction that the company needs, making sure that that’s always clear and people know what we’re all about. The second thing is capital allocation. We only have so many resources. Making sure that you’re putting those resources where you have the greatest opportunity. And the third, which I think by far is the most important, is to make sure that you have the right people in the most important jobs inside the company.
African-Americans  capital_allocation  CEOs  death_row  Kenneth_Frazier  HLS  lawyers  Merck  new_graduates  pharmaceutical_industry  priorities  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_acquisition  think_threes  the_right_people 
march 2018 by jerryking
Nice Speech, Mark Zuckerberg! You’re Still a Few Credits Short - WSJ
By Deepa Seetharaman and Sarah E. Needleman
May 26, 2017

Mr. Zuckerberg opened his afternoon commencement speech with a few jokes and then urged graduates to “create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose” at a time when jobs are declining due to automation and social safety nets are wearing thin.

Today’s great struggle, he said, is between the “forces of freedom, openness and global community against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism.”
Mark_Zuckerberg  Harvard  Commencement  speeches  Colleges_&_Universities  dropouts  new_graduates 
may 2017 by jerryking
Goldman breaks tradition with unconventional choice
December 17/ December 18, 2016 | Financial Times | Ben McLannahan.

His promotion to chief information officer in 2013 ― after a stint at Credit Suisse and Kiodex, an energy trading software company ― meant that he sat atop Goldman’s biggest division, accounting for about one-third of global headcount.

A big part of that job has been bringing down the amount the bank spends on maintaining old systems, which consume about one-third of Goldman’s annual $3bn tech budgets, according to estimates by Credit Suisse analysts.

He has also taken a page out of Google and Facebook’s playbook and started giving away some of the bank’s trading technology to clients via open-source software, inviting them to use it and improve it.

What sets Mr Chavez apart is “his ability to take decisive action based on what the world will look like in five to 10 years”, says Tom Farley, president of the New York Stock Exchange, who worked with him at Kiodex. “Other people may have a view of the future but they’re afraid to act on it.”

In an address to Goldman interns this summer, Mr Chavez told them that as a new graduate, he wanted to “get busy and do a bunch of things”. When he landed on Wall Street, he learnt that people called that attitude “optionality”.

“You don’t know that these options are going to be worth something, but if you do the work, pay the premium, own a whole bunch of these options on a lot of different outcomes and you’re diversified enough, probably something will work out,” he said.
Goldman_Sachs  Martin_Chavez  CFOs  appointments  Wall_Street  unconventional  SecDB  databases  generating_strategic_options  forward_looking  CIOs  Hispanics  optionality  new_graduates  legacy_tech  playbooks 
december 2016 by jerryking
Technology and markets are driving employment in the right direction - The Globe and Mail
RICK LASH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Oct. 17, 2016

The best way to achieve higher profits is ensuring maximum flexibility in the workforce so the organization can adapt to rapidly changing market needs. Having a more flexible employee pool that you can hire and furlough depending on business demands is one way to manage risk.

If technology and new finance-driven business models are fundamentally altering the future of jobs and work, what’s a new graduate (or an older worker) to do? All is not hopeless, and in fact there is indeed a silver lining, if one knows where to look.

Companies like Uber are figuring it out, at least for now. The same technology that is replacing workers with intelligent robots (on the shop floor or as an app on your smartphone) is also being used to create new models of generating wealth. Whether you are a bank driving growth through new on-line channels, a streaming music company designing creative new ways for consumers to subscribe, or an entrepreneur raising capital online for a new invention, key skills stand out as differentiators for success.
automation  technology  artificial_Intelligence  risk-management  data_driven  silver_linings  skills  new_graduates  job_search  business_models  rapid_change  workforce  flexibility  Uber  on-demand  streaming 
october 2016 by jerryking
The One Question You Should Ask About Every New Job - The New York Times
Adam Grant DEC. 19, 2015

The culture of a workplace — an organization’s values, norms and practices — has a huge impact on our happiness and success.....
But how do you figure out the culture of a company you’ve never worked for? As Nicole tried to evaluate company cultures, she kept asking the Passover question: “How is this organization different from all other organizations?” And, as with Passover, I told Nicole, the answer should come in the form of a story. Ask people to tell you a story about something that happened at their organization but wouldn’t elsewhere....If you’re still unsure where to work, start asking for stories about one practice that says a lot about a culture — a practice that consumes more than half of the time in big organizations. When people find it productive and enjoyable, that’s a good sign.
new_graduates  job_search  storytelling  organizational_culture  Managing_Your_Career  questions  Adam_Grant 
january 2016 by jerryking
David Politis of BetterCloud: Start by Working Beyond Your Résumé - The New York Times
This interview with David Politis, chief executive of BetterCloud, a maker of cloud-based software, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.
new_graduates  advice  CEOs 
july 2015 by jerryking
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates - Law Blog - WSJ
Jul 15, 2015 LAWYERS & LAW FIRMS
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates
ARTICLE
COMMENTS (23)
ADAM LEITMAN BAILEY
IVY LEAGUE
4.3k 157
By JACOB GERSHMAN
law  law_schools  Ivy_League  new_graduates 
july 2015 by jerryking
The greatest piece of career advice you will ever get - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MCALLISTER, MIKE MARRINER AND NATHAN GEBHARD
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 08, 2015
advice  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  passions 
june 2015 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
Robert_Shiller  Yale  Harvard  college-educated  education  students  automation  machine_learning  Colleges_&_Universities  finance  continuing_education  continuous_learning  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  interdisciplinary  curriculum  entrepreneurship  syllabus  interpretation  expertise  uncharted_problems 
may 2015 by jerryking
How to Avoid Commencement Clichés - NYTimes.com
MAY 12, 2015 | NYT | Arthur C. Brooks
NATIONWIDE, commencement speakers are preparing remarks to deliver to this year’s crop of college graduates. I was one, and frankly I was a little worried. I wanted to inspire and uplift, but I was well aware that, more often than not, graduation addresses are met with blank stares and tepid
speeches  Colleges_&_Universities  new_graduates  career_paths  commencement  clichés 
may 2015 by jerryking
Lawrence H. Summers: ‘There are many ways of burdening our future’ - The Globe and Mail
RUDYARD GRIFFITHS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 20 2015

Lawrence Summers: confidence is the cheapest form of stimulus.

If a young person asked you, ‘How do I thrive in a low-growth economy?’ what would your advice be?

It’s never been more important to be comfortable with technology, to be well-educated, to not just know things, but know how to learn, and develop a set of distinctive skills that employers can value. For people who are able to do those things, the combination of technology and global markets will make this a moment of immense opportunity........There are many ways of burdening the future. One is to borrow money – though, given how low interest rates are, those burdens aren't that great. Another is to defer maintenance. Those costs accumulate at a much greater rate, and that's why I think infrastructure investment is so very important. Another way to burden future generations is to scrimp on education. Another way is to fail to invest in basic scientific research. Another way is to saddle them with huge pension liabilities for those who are working, serving the public today. We are doing all those things.
Rudyard_Griffiths  America_in_Decline?  growth  economy  technology  automation  deferred_maintenance  downward_mobility  infrastructure  skills  advice  new_graduates  economic_stagnation  the_Great_Decoupling  low_growth  slow_growth  confidence  economic_stimulus  leaps_of_faith  Larry_Summers 
march 2015 by jerryking
Skills in Flux - NYTimes.com
MARCH 17, 2015| NYT |David Brooks.

As the economy changes, the skills required to thrive in it change, too, and it takes a while before these new skills are defined and acknowledged.

For example, in today’s loosely networked world, people with social courage have amazing value. Everyone goes to conferences and meets people, but some people invite six people to lunch afterward and follow up with four carefully tended friendships forevermore. Then they spend their lives connecting people across networks.

People with social courage are extroverted in issuing invitations but introverted in conversation — willing to listen 70 percent of the time.
David_Brooks  skills  networking  social_courage  Communicating_&_Connecting  conferences  sense-making  indispensable  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  following_up 
march 2015 by jerryking
How to Leave a Mark - NYTimes.com
JAN. 27, 2015 | NYT |David Brooks.

Impact investors seek out companies that are intentionally designed both to make a profit and provide a measurable and accountable social good. Impact funds are frequently willing to accept lower financial returns for the sake of doing good — say a 7 percent annual return compared with an 11 percent return. But some impact investors are seeking to deliver market-rate returns....It’s hard to find a reliable way to measure the social impact of these dual-purpose companies. Impact investors have also had trouble finding scalable deals to invest in. It costs as much to do due diligence on a $250 million deal as on a $25 million deal, so many firms would rather skip the small stuff... impact investing is now entering the mainstream. An older generation used their (rigorous) business mind in one setting and then their (often sloppy) charity mind in another. Today more people want to blend these minds. Typically a big client, or a young heir, will go to his or her investments adviser and say, “I want some socially useful investments in my portfolio.”...Impact investing is not going to replace government or be a panacea, but it’s one of a number of new tools to address social problems. If you want to leave a mark on the world but are unsure of how to do it, I’d say take a look. If you’re a high-net-worth individual (a rich person), ask your adviser to get you involved. If you’re young and searching, get some finance and operational skills and then find a way to get involved in a socially useful investment proposition. If you’ve got a business mind, there are huge opportunities to build the infrastructure (creating measuring systems, connecting investors with deals).
David_Brooks  capitalism  impact_investing  hard_to_find  Michael_McDerment  high_net_worth  new_graduates  skills  passions  passion_investing  TBL  social_impact  measurements  high-impact  heirs 
january 2015 by jerryking
Roger Ferguson of TIAA-CREF: Always Act as if You’re an Owner - NYTimes.com
NOV. 29, 2014 | NYT | Adam Bryant.
Is there a value on your list that is particularly important to you?

One is about personal accountability. One of the phrases I use is that if you owned this company, what would you do? And if your colleagues were owners, what would you want them to do?

What are your best interview questions?

What do you do with your free time? I’m listening for somebody who is a little more balanced. I’m always asking about team experiences, and about resilience and fortitude. How did you recover from setbacks? What did you do? I like to hear stories, and concrete examples.

What career and life advice do you give to graduating college students?

You have to be prepared to take some risks and maybe fail a little bit. Don’t make the same mistake over and over again, but don’t be afraid of making any mistakes. Because your career is like a climbing wall, not a ladder, and you don’t know where it’s going to end up. You have to be a continuous learner as you go up the wall.
money_management  pension_funds  setbacks  CEOs  African-Americans  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  advice  new_graduates  values  accountability  interviews  TIAA-CREF  Harvard  owners 
december 2014 by jerryking
If I Were 22: Face It, You're Going to Be Kissing Some Career Frogs
May 19, 2014 | LinkedIn | Sallie Krawcheck.

At this early stage of your career, there’s a real temptation to go into a field of work because your friends are or because it’s “hot.” But there’s also an enormously small likelihood that it will still be hot 10, 20, 30, 40 years from now. So, rather than wedding yourself to an industry, instead shift your focus to gaining experiences and learning as much as you can, so that you build transferrable skills.

For you, Sallie-at-22, that will be in the banking and media industries; in the finance, marketing and sales functions; and in writing and financial analysis. Keep a running note of what works and what doesn’t work for you, what you like and what you don’t like, what you’re good and what you aren’t, the work styles that suit you and what doesn’t, where you passions lie and what leaves you cold. The chance of the stars aligning on these fronts in your first job, or even your first couple of jobs, is very low, so you’ll have to keep searching.

By building up this store of knowledge, you’re going to have what feels like a lightning bolt insight that you should be in equity research at the mature old age of 29.
career_paths  new_graduates  advice  trial_&_error  Managing_Your_Career  Sallie_Krawcheck  equity_research  journaling  reflections 
may 2014 by jerryking
How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com
APRIL 19, 2014 | NYT| Thomas L. Friedman.

(1) “The first and most important thing is to be explicit and willful in making the decisions about what you want to get out of this investment in your education.”
(2) make sure that you’re getting out of it not only a broadening of your knowledge but skills that will be valued in today’s workplace. Your college degree is not a proxy anymore for having the skills or traits to do any job.

What are those traits? One is grit, he said. Shuffling through résumés of some of Google’s 100 hires that week, Bock explained: “I was on campus speaking to a student who was a computer science and math double major, who was thinking of shifting to an economics major because the computer science courses were too difficult. I told that student they are much better off being a B student in computer science than an A+ student in English because it signals a rigor in your thinking and a more challenging course load. That student will be one of our interns this summer.”

“What you want to do is say: ‘Here’s the attribute I’m going to demonstrate; here’s the story demonstrating it; here’s how that story demonstrated that attribute.’ ” And here is how it can create value. (Apply this also to cover letters).
howto  job_search  Google  Tom_Friedman  Lazlo_Bock  attributes  cognitive_skills  creativity  liberal_arts  résumés  new_graduates  coverletters  hiring  Managing_Your_Career  talent  grit  interviews  interview_preparation  value_creation  Jason_Isaacs  Asha_Isaacs  Jazmin_Isaacs 
april 2014 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  emotions  empathy  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms 
february 2014 by jerryking
Reopening an Employment Door to the Young - NYTimes.com
FEB. 1, 2014 | NYT | By ROBERT W. GOLDFARB.

Many liberal-arts graduates say they are eager to find an employer willing to train them in skills that don’t require a degree in engineering or computer science. They cite six-sigma analysis, supply-chain procedures, customer service, inventory control, quality assurance and Internet marketing. They want a chance to master one of those skills.

But their pleas appear unlikely to be answered. Most corporate training today is directed at employees who arrive with technical skills already developed — if not through their college degrees, then though specialized internships.
new_graduates  hiring  liberal_arts 
february 2014 by jerryking
What I wish I had known: 16 student tips on how to find a job - The Globe and Mail
GLOBE AND MAIL STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 09 2014

Send to amita
education  students  Colleges_&_Universities  job_search  tips  new_graduates 
january 2014 by jerryking
Goldman juniors
Nov. 9, 2013 |The Financial Times p16.|

Hotshot university grads should not worry that Goldman Sachs' plan to cut back the hours of junior bankers is just a ruse. They should worry that it's for re...
Goldman_Sachs  Wall_Street  new_graduates 
december 2013 by jerryking
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Jerry's Advice to New Grads
Take a long term perspective: the overarching goal should be to generate as many career options for yourself in May 2016 as possible.
Becoming an attractive candidate to start-ups/entrepreneu...
JCK  advice  new_graduates  feedback  generating_strategic_options 
november 2013 by jerryking
▶ Broke Ass by datgyaldeh
Heartfelt and real, this song captures the frustration of being educated and unemployed.
R&B  music  Toronto  unemployment  African_Canadians  new_graduates 
august 2013 by jerryking
What It Takes to Make New College Graduates Employable - NYTimes.com
By ALINA TUGEND
Published: June 28, 2013

When it comes to the skills most needed by employers, job candidates are lacking most in written and oral communication skills, adaptability and managing multiple priorities, and making decisions and problem solving,”
Colleges_&_Universities  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  decision_making  college-educated  problem_solving 
june 2013 by jerryking
The Internship - Not the Movie - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 8, 2013

Internships are increasingly important today, they explained, because skills are increasingly important in the new economy and because colleges increasingly don’t teach the ones employers are looking for. Experience, rather than a degree, has become an important proxy for skill, they note, and internships give you that experience. So grab one wherever you can, they add, because, even if you’re just serving coffee, it is a way to see how businesses actually work and which skills are prized by employers.... Since so many internships are unpaid these days, added Sedlet, there is a real danger that only “rich kids” can afford them, which will only widen our income gaps. The key, if you get one, he added, is to remember “that companies don’t want generalists to help them think big; they want people who can help them execute” and “add value.”

But what, they were often asked, does “add value” mean? It means, they said, show that you have some creative flair — particularly in design, innovation, entrepreneurship, sales or marketing, skills that can’t be easily replaced by a piece of software, a machine or a cheaper worker in India.
job_search  tips  internships  HireArt  Managing_Your_Career  value_creation  new_graduates  experience  thinking_big  value_added  creativity  imagination  execution  Tom_Friedman  non-routine  in-person  special_sauce 
june 2013 by jerryking
How to Get a Job
May 28, 2013 |NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

employers are designing their own tests to measure applicants’ skills. One of the best ways to understand the changing labor market is to talk to the co-founders of HireArt (www.hireart.com): Eleonora Sharef, 27, a veteran of McKinsey; and Nick Sedlet, 28, a math whiz who left Goldman Sachs. Their start-up was designed to bridge the divide between job-seekers and job-creators....The way HireArt works, explained Sharef (who was my daughter’s college roommate), is that clients — from big companies, like Cisco, Safeway and Airbnb, to small family firms — come with a job description and then HireArt designs online written and video tests relevant for that job. Then HireArt culls through the results and offers up the most promising applicants to the company, which chooses among them....The most successful job candidates, she added, are “inventors and solution-finders,” who are relentlessly “entrepreneurial” because they understand that many employers today don’t care about your résumé, degree or how you got your knowledge, but only what you can do and what you can continuously reinvent yourself to do.

Published: May 28, 2013
Tom_Friedman  entrepreneurship  start_ups  HireArt  job_search  howto  new_graduates  reinvention  inventors  solution-finders 
may 2013 by jerryking
Kirk McDonald: Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You - WSJ.com
May 9, 2013 | WSJ | By KIRK MCDONALD.

Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You
If you're at all interested in media, technology or related fields, please learn a little computer programming.
Colleges_&_Universities  hiring  career_paths  software  new_graduates  coding 
may 2013 by jerryking
Amazing Career Advice For College Grads From LinkedIn's Billionaire Founder - Business Insider
1. Competition.
What should I do with my Life? is the WRONG question--it's too self-absorbed. Instead, make it about everyone else, which means isolating your competitive advantage (assets, aspirations, market realities). In terms of making a positive difference in the world, ask "how can I help?"
2. Networks
Proactively build your network.Relationships matter as people control access to resources, opportunities and information. It's likely that someone I already know knows someone who could help me.
3. Risk
Actions, not plans generate useful lessons. Playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do--learn to take Intelligent Risks. Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. If the worst case scenario is losing a bit of time or money or experiencing some discomfort, this is a worthwhile risk. if the worst case scenario is the serious tarnishing of one's reputation, loss of all economic assets, or something otherwise career ending, don't accept that risk. The best opportunities can be the one with the most question marks.
advice  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  LinkedIn  career_ending_moves  entrepreneurship  indispensable  serving_others  Colleges_&_Universities  students  new_graduates  job_search  discomforts  action-oriented  self-absorbed  playing_it_safe 
may 2013 by jerryking
What Data Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 18, 2013

there are many things big data does poorly. Let’s note a few in rapid-fire fashion:

* Data struggles with the social. Your brain is pretty bad at math (quick, what’s the square root of 437), but it’s excellent at social cognition. People are really good at mirroring each other’s emotional states, at detecting uncooperative behavior and at assigning value to things through emotion.
* Data struggles with context. Human decisions are embedded in contexts. The human brain has evolved to account for this reality...Data analysis is pretty bad at narrative and emergent thinking.
* Data creates bigger haystacks. This is a point Nassim Taleb, the author of “Antifragile,” has made. As we acquire more data, we have the ability to find many, many more statistically significant correlations. Most of these correlations are spurious and deceive us when we’re trying to understand a situation.
* Big data has trouble with big (e.g. societal) problems.
* Data favors memes over masterpieces. Data analysis can detect when large numbers of people take an instant liking to some cultural product. But many important (and profitable) products are hated initially because they are unfamiliar. [The unfamiliar has to accomplish behavioural change / bridge cultural divides]
* Data obscures hidden/implicit value judgements. I recently saw an academic book with the excellent title, “ ‘Raw Data’ Is an Oxymoron.” One of the points was that data is never raw; it’s always structured according to somebody’s predispositions and values. The end result looks disinterested, but, in reality, there are value choices all the way through, from construction to interpretation.

This is not to argue that big data isn’t a great tool. It’s just that, like any tool, it’s good at some things and not at others. As the Yale professor Edward Tufte has said, “The world is much more interesting than any one discipline.”
massive_data_sets  David_Brooks  data_driven  decision_making  data  Nassim_Taleb  contrarians  skepticism  new_graduates  contextual  risks  social_cognition  self-deception  correlations  value_judgements  haystacks  narratives  memes  unfamiliarity  naivete  hidden  Edward_Tufte  emotions  antifragility  behavioral_change  new_products  cultural_products  masterpieces  EQ  emotional_intelligence 
february 2013 by jerryking
Graduates, Take Heed - WSJ.com
June 11, 2004 | WSJ | By DANIEL AKST.

if you are dreaming of making the world a better place...just go out and make the most money you can. Then, if you still want to do more, give it away....Economics, remember, is not a zero-sum game. Capital is the lifeblood of the economy, fueling the productivity gains that in turn fuel expanding affluence and social progress. As if none of this were sufficient, Alex's earnings required him to pay enough income taxes over the years for the government to employ a small army of social workers. He never shirked these obligations through dubious tax-shelter schemes, either. And don't forget the foundation!

The conclusion is unavoidable: If you have a good education, you shouldn't just consider getting rich. Creating and amassing wealth is an outright moral obligation. Do so and you can take comfort not just in financing public services but in knowing that you are giving people what they need or want, generating jobs and underwriting the affluence that makes art, justice, environmental protection and other social goods possible.

Of course, making yourself a pile of money is good for you too. You'll live in a better neighborhood, drive a safer car, get to be more selective in choosing a spouse and enjoy a longer, healthier life. Your kids will get a better education, which in turn will mean more of the same for them, too -- and will better equip them to improve the world still more.
commencement  advice  Wall_Street  capitalism  new_graduates  personal_enrichment  career_paths  finance  wealth_creation  philanthropy  tithing  geographic_sorting  compounded  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  zero-sum_games 
august 2012 by jerryking
College come-ons
March 1998 | American Demographics | by Tibbett L. Speer

Transition periods are key times to get consumers to change previous behaviors. In college, there are several - dorm to apartment, apartment to apartment, apartment to first job. The college market is a good-sized target, and it is growing. More than 14 million students are projected to enroll in US higher-education institutions in 1998, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Best time to get students' attention is during spring break. Goofy games and product give-aways still prevail during break debaucheries. But companies have evolved beyond the beach, tracking students back to campus and even to their parents' homes. For example, Ford Motor Co. solicits recent graduates and soon-to-be graduates with direct mailings sent to their permanent address. The company generates collegiate sales by offering students a $400 cash incentive to purchase a car, or $650 to lease one. Other ways to entice students are discussed, as are the places to do so.
Colleges_&_Universities  students  marketing  transitions  new_graduates  behavioral_change 
july 2012 by jerryking
Advice from the Corner Office: Use Google; Avoid Grammar Gaffes - Law Blog - WSJ
May 30, 2008 | WSJ | By Jamie Heller.

Read Justice Scalia’s New Book on Advocacy: It’s “important and entirely accurate” says Berry. Among the points that stood out to Berry: Write well. It’s okay, for example, to use synonyms in briefs, within limits, though the same rule wouldn’t apply with contracts.

Get Yourself Smart on a Subject, Fast: When they get assignments, he says, self starters “contextualize” the issue by “Googling stuff for fifteen minutes.” Lexis and Westlaw, he says, are fine for focusing on a point of law. But the peripheral vision provided by a Web search is also invaluable. It can yield relevant law journal articles, blog posts, plaintiffs’ lawyers sites, law-firm newsletters and the like.

Make Grammatical Mistakes and Typos at Your Peril: “Do not ever for the second time give your senior a piece of writing with a typo or a grammatical mistake,” says Berry. “I will take it once and I will tell the junior my set speech.” But if it happens again? Well, find out for yourself.
What is Berry’s set speech? A lawyer’s job is “to force the reader’s mind in a direction, to move a mind forward through the ideas.” A grammatical error or typo “derails the train of thought.”
grammar  Google  CEOs  writing  spelling  lawyers  law_firms  advice  new_graduates  perspectives  contextual  individual_initiative  self-starters  LexisNexis  Westlaw 
june 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  open-ended  persuasion  statistics  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  storytelling  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  Andrew_McAfee  numeracy  insights  sense-making  jobs  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
10 Things They Don't Tell You at Graduation - WSJ.com
April 27, 2012 | WSJ | By CHARLES WHEELAN.

10 Things Your Commencement Speaker Won't Tell You

April 27, 2012 | WSJ | By CHARLES WHEELAN.

10 Things Your Commencement Speaker Won't Tell You

1. Your time in fraternity basements was well spent. The same goes for the time you spent playing intramural sports, working on the school newspaper or just hanging with friends. ...One of the most important causal factors associated with happiness and well-being is your meaningful connections with other human beings....think "friendships.

2. Some of your worst days lie ahead. Graduation is a happy day. But my job is to tell you that if you are going to do anything worthwhile, you will face periods of grinding self-doubt and failure. Be prepared to work through them. ... no one can afford to retire.

3. Don't make the world worse. .... don't use your prodigious talents to mess things up.

4. Marry up

5. Help stop the Little League arms race. Kids' sports are becoming ridiculously structured and competitive. What happened to playing baseball because it's fun? We are systematically creating races out of things that ought to be a journey. We know that success isn't about simply running faster than everyone else in some predetermined direction.

6. Read obituaries. They are just like biographies, only shorter. They remind us that interesting, successful people rarely lead orderly, linear lives.

7. Your parents don't want what is best for you. They want what is good for you, which isn't always the same thing. There is a natural instinct to protect our children from risk and discomfort, and therefore to urge safe choices. Theodore Roosevelt—soldier, explorer, president—once remarked, "It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed."

8. Don't model your life after a circus animal. Performing animals do tricks because their trainers throw them peanuts or small fish for doing so. You should aspire to do better. You will be a friend, a parent, a coach, an employee—and so on. But only in your job will you be explicitly evaluated and rewarded for your performance. Don't let your life decisions be distorted by the fact that your boss is the only one tossing you peanuts. ...

9. It's all borrowed time. Take nothing for granted, not even tomorrow. ....the "hit by a bus" rule. Would I regret spending my life this way if I were to get hit by a bus next week or next year? And the important corollary: Does this path lead to a life I will be happy with and proud of in 10 or 20 years if I don't get hit by a bus.

10. Don't try to be great. Being great involves luck and other circumstances beyond your control. The less you think about being great, the more likely it is to happen. And if it doesn't, there is absolutely nothing wrong with being solid.
commencement  Colleges_&_Universities  good_enough  public_speaking  speeches  Communicating_&_Connecting  new_graduates  self-doubt  failure  risk-taking  discomforts  marriage  obituaries  Theodore_Roosevelt  happiness  friendships  arms_race  personal_connections  advice  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  luck  mybestlife 
april 2012 by jerryking
Find a Job Using Disruptive Innovation - Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen - Harvard Business Review
10:55 AM Wednesday March 7, 2012
by Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen

Disruptive innovators ask the right questions, observe the world like anthropologists, network for novel ideas, and experiment to make things work. (For a more detailed look at these skills, see The Innovator's DNA).
anthropologists  asking_the_right_questions  innovation  disruption  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  JCK  questions 
march 2012 by jerryking
The Coming Revolution in Mobile Job Hunting - Finance and Accounting Jobs News and Advice
Mar 07 2012
The Coming Revolution in Mobile Job Hunting
By Joseph Walker

Recent graduates and college and graduate students surveyed are either using their smartphones for career-related purposes or could imagine themselves doing so....Yet just a quarter of the 117 American companies surveyed had either a mobile application or mobile-enabled website....AT&T, in 2009 optimized portions of its careers site for mobile users. It uses "sniffer" technology to detect what device someone is using and then directs them to a page designed for that particular smartphone. In the coming months, it will release a new version of its mobile site that will make even more content from its desktop site available to mobile users, said Jennifer Terry, director of staffing strategic initiatives.
job_search  mobile_phones  smartphones  Colleges_&_Universities  new_graduates  Managing_Your_Career  mobile_applications 
march 2012 by jerryking
8 Things You Can Do To Evolve Your Career - Business Insider
Shira Levine|December 03, 2011|
There's no such thing as a second career.

We only have evolving careers, says marketing expert James Marshall Reilly. Reilly wrote Shake the World: It's Not About Finding a Job, It's About Creating a Life. The book tackles the job market, social entrepreneurship and philanthro-capitalism, and will be released in late December....Reilly's book talks to the "young game-changers" of this generation and seeks to discover how they found success. By game-changers, he means entrepreneurs, both business and social. There are no Young Turk investment bankers, politicians or cancer doctors in his book. These are people who design iPod covers, magazine publishers, serial technology entrepreneurs and the founders of innovative non-profits. There is not a Rotary Club membership between them.
book_reviews  books  start_ups  career_paths  career  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  new_graduates  millennials  entrepreneurship  game_changers 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Start-Up of You - NYTimes.com
July 12, 2011 | NYT | Tom Friedman. Reid Hoffman, has a book
coming out in 2012 called “The Start-Up of You,” co-authored with Ben
Casnocha. Its subtitle could easily be: “Hey, recent graduates! Hey,
35-year-old midcareer professional! Here’s how you build your career
today.” ....Hoffman argues that professionals need an entirely new
mind-set & skill set to compete. “The old paradigm of climb up a
stable career ladder is dead & gone,” “No career is a sure thing
anymore. The uncertain, rapidly changing conditions in which
entrepreneurs start companies is what it’s like for fashioning a career.
Therefore, approach career strategy the same way an entrepreneur
approaches starting a business.” Ditch the grand life plan.
Entrepreneurs don’t write a 100-pg. biz plan and execute it one time; be
emergent....use your netwk. to pull in info. & intelligence about
where the growth opportunities are [this would be knowledge or market intelligence] — & invest in yourself to build [transferrable] skills that will allow you to profit from those opportunities.
books  career  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  start_ups  entrepreneurship  pattern_recognition  opportunistic  Tom_Friedman  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  new_graduates  individual_initiative  rapid_change  emergent  market_intelligence  transferable_skills 
july 2011 by jerryking
How Spider-Man Poisoned Its Own Prospects -
Mar. 11, 2011|BusinessWeek |By Rick Wartzman.

Jason Isaacs

Past performance doesn't necessarily guarantee future accomplishment, especially in a new job. "There is no reliable way to test or predict whether a person
successful in one area can make a successful transition to a different
environment," Drucker wrote. "This can be learned only by experience."
...One day, the senior partner called Drucker in. "I understand you did
very good securities analysis," the boss said. "But if we had wanted you
to do securities analysis work, we would have left you where you were.
You are now the executive secretary to the partners, yet you continue to
do securities analysis. What should you be doing now, to be effective
in your new job?" People stumble moving up the ladder because they
continue in their new assignment what made them successful in the old
assignment and what earned them the promotion...they turn
incompetent..because they are doing the wrong things."
first90days  Peter_Drucker  theatre  lessons_learned  directors  effectiveness  career  transitions  career_paths  new_graduates  movingonup  advice  Jason_Isaacs  past_performance  career_ending_moves 
march 2011 by jerryking
American Dream is Changing | Nye - Gateway to Nevada's Rurals
Oct. 31, 2010 | Nye Gateway | by Fareed Zakaria. What can
you do to make yourself thrive in this new global economy? (1) Be
unique. Try to do something that is a specialized craft or art,
something that is as much art as craft, something that feels more like
artisanship than routine work, things that are custom & custom-made
still survive. (2) Go local. Do something that can’t be outsourced,
jobs involving personal face-to-face contact will never go to India. (3)
Be indispensable. Can everyone become indispensable? Well, no, but if
you learn a difficult craft and are good at it, if you can collaborate
well, synthesize well, put things together, work with others and work
well across countries and cultures, you will have a leg-up. (4) Learn a
foreign language (e.g. Spanish or Mandarin or Hindi). (5) Excel at
mathematics, able to manipulate data, algorithms, symbols, graphs,
balance sheets and all of these skills are the essential skills for a
knowledge-based economy.
Fareed_Zakaria  21st._century  ksfs  indispensable  specialization  local  languages  mathematics  organizing_data  advice  new_graduates  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke  quantitative  global_economy  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  the_American_dream  in-person  face2face  uniqueness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Guy Kawasaki - I Want 5 Sentences, Not ‘War and Peace’ - Question - NYTimes.com
March 19, 2010 | New York Times | This interview of Guy
Kawasaki, a co-founder of Alltop, a news aggregation site, and managing
director of Garage Technology Ventures, was conducted, edited and
condensed by Adam Bryant.

Jobs for college graduates should make them gain knowledge in at least
one of these three areas: how to make something, how to sell something
or how to support something.
Guy_Kawasaki  Peter_Drucker  advice  howto  life_skills  education  new_graduates  college-educated 
march 2010 by jerryking
New Programs Aim to Lure Young Into Digital Jobs
December 20, 2009 |New York Times | STEVE LOHR.Hybrid careers
like Dr. Halamka’s that combine computing with other fields will
increasingly be the new American jobs of the future, labor experts say.
In other words, the nation’s economy is going to need more cool nerds.
But not enough young people are embracing computing — often because they
are leery of being branded nerds.
Steve_Lohr  Colleges_&_Universities  students  career_paths  STEM  new_graduates  nerds  young_people 
december 2009 by jerryking
Dear Graduate...
JUNE 19, 2006 | Business Week | By Jack and Suzy Welch. (1) As
an ambitious 22-year-old readying to enter the corporate world, how can I
quickly distinguish myself as a winner? -- Dain Zaitz, Corvallis, Ore.

One gets ahead by over-delivering. Start thinking big. Go beyond being the grunt assigned. Do the extra legwork and data-crunching to give [clients] something that really expands their thinking—an analysis, for instance, of how an entire industry might play out over the next three years. What new companies and products might emerge? What technologies could change the game? Could someone, perhaps the client's own company, move production to China?

(2) Revenue growth is at the top of my to-do list. What should I look
for in hiring great sales professionals? -- John Cioffi, Westfield, N.J.
questions  hiring  recruiting  Managing_Your_Career  advice  Jack_Welch  strategic_thinking  anticipating  new_graduates  chutzpah  movingonup  overdeliver  Pablo_Picasso  individual_initiative  generating_strategic_options  independent_viewpoints  thinking_big  game_changers 
november 2009 by jerryking
The Best Places to Launch a Career
September 4, 2008, | Business Week | by Lindsey Gerdes.
The Best Places to Launch a Career
To lure and keep young talent when cash is tight, companies of all
stripes are appealing to Gen Yers' ambitions for speedy advancement—and
their desire to do good while doing well
Managing_Your_Career  onboarding  talent_management  Freshbooks  Colleges_&_Universities  new_graduates 
september 2009 by jerryking
Why New Grads Love Cisco -
September 3, 2009 | BusinessWeek | By Lindsey Gerdes

Cisco Choice, launched in 2006. Allows new grads to choose which
department they'll join and which manager they'll work for. After a
week-long overview of the company and a week of presentations from
managers at more than 30 business units, cohorts spend a final week
meeting with the managers and employees in each participant's five
favorite business units. Each employee then selected his or her top
three managers and await placement. Managers are eager to accept the
additional manpower because most of the training and salary costs come
out of the corporate budget, not their own.
Cisco  Colleges_&_Universities  onboarding  Freshbooks  new_graduates  retention 
september 2009 by jerryking
The Best Places to Launch a Career
September 3, 2009 | Business Week | By Lindsey Gerdes.
Graduates lucky enough to land a job may find the prospect of
responsibility and rapid advancement surprisingly strong. But don't
count on bigger salaries!

By Lindsey Gerdes
Colleges_&_Universities  Managing_Your_Career  Freshbooks  onboarding  talent_management  new_graduates 
september 2009 by jerryking
Business Schools Gird for Wall Street Woes - WSJ.com
Sept. 23, 2008 article by Alina Dizik on initiatives by career
offices at business schools to assist alumni impacted by the economic
crisis
Ivey  Managing_Your_Career  economic_downturn  career  UFSC  economics  business_schools  Colleges_&_Universities  MBAs  new_graduates 
january 2009 by jerryking

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