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jerryking : news   18

Six rules for managing our era’s oversupply of non-stop news, high-decibel outrage
May 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | editorials.

Rule No. 1: You don’t need to have an opinion about everything. Shocking but true. ....It’s perfectly fair to say, “I don’t know enough to have an opinion on that," or, “I will leave that to others to debate,” or even, “Both sides have some good points.” You might not please everyone, but see Rule No. 2.

* Rule No. 2: You can’t please everyone. Get over it.

* Rule No. 3: Embrace ambivalence....often misinterpreted as indifference, or derided as indecision. In fact, the ability to entertain contradictory but animating ideas goes to the heart of what it means to be a mature and civilized human being. It’s also central to preserving political freedom. The most dangerous person in a democracy is the blind partisan who outsources her opinions to politicians or an ideology, and who sees those who don’t agree as enemies to be righteously chased from town by a torch-wielding mob. The biggest threat to such black-and-white partisanship is the person who keeps her mind open, is not blindly loyal to any one team and sees people with different opinions not as monsters to be slain but as human beings to be understood, especially when you disagree with them, and they disagree with you.

* Rule No. 4: When you take a stand, be forceful. While the process of reaching a conclusion should involve a lot of “on the one hand” and “on the other,” at some point you have to make a choice.

In a criminal trial, the decision to convict an accused person can only be taken if the evidence is persuasive beyond a reasonable doubt – in other words, if the evidence is irrefutable and the conclusion is certain. But in politics, business and life, most decisions must be taken under conditions that cannot meet that exacting standard. Reasonable doubts are reasonable. Only the extreme partisan is without them.

* Rule No. 5: Set your bottom line. How far are you willing to let another person go before you feel obliged to offer a counter-opinion? Not every take you hear deserves the energy required to argue against it. Sometimes, you have to just let people say things you don’t agree with. You might learn something.

And remember, just as there is no obligation to have an opinion on every subject, there is also no rule that says you must express your opinion every time the chance presents itself. But when someone or something does cross a line, sometimes you can’t hold back. It may be as lofty as a matter of justice, or a simple as a question of common sense, but there comes a moment when your opinion will matter.

* Rule No. 6: Opinions are not the same thing as empathy. Empathy is what makes it possible for people who disagree to live together in peace and harmony – to agreeably disagree. And in a multicultural, multireligious, multiracial, multiparty democracy, people are going to disagree about all sorts of things, all the time.

The world has enough opinions. What it really needs is more empathy. Without it, life isn’t possible.
21st._century  agreeably_disagree  ambivalence  commoditization_of_information  disagreements  disinformation  dual-consciousness  empathy  hard_choices  incivility  incompatibilities  indecision  information_overload  news  opinions  open_mind  outrage  partial_truths  partisanship  partisan_loyalty  political_spin  propaganda  rules_of_the_game 
may 2019 by jerryking
With the iPhone Sputtering, Apple Bets Its Future on TV and News
March 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle.

The iPhone is running out of juice. To go beyond the device that made Apple Inc. a global colossus, Tim Cook is betting on a suite of services—marking the company’s biggest shift in more than a decade......Apple will take a giant leap forward announcing video- and news-subscription services that it hopes will generate billions of dollars in new annual revenue and deepen ties between iPhone users and the company.....apps and services, from Spotify to Netflix to China’s WeChat , have often become more important to users than the devices that run them. .....The company’s ambition in video is to become an alternative to cable, combining original series with shows from other networks to create a new entertainment service that can reach more than 100 markets world-wide. ....Apple hasn’t said what it will charge for the programming. .....The original series will be delivered in a new TV app that staff have been calling a Netflix killer.....Apple has been negotiating to bring its new TV app to multiple platforms, including Roku and smart TVs.........Apple plans to showcase a revamped News app that includes a premium tier with access to more than 200 magazines—including Bon Appétit, People and Glamour—as well as newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal.....The Washington Post and New York Times aren’t participating in the new app...... in the early 2000s, co-founder Steve Jobs reinvented the company by pushing it into mobile devices. The iPod and its accompanying iTunes service revived a company that was largely dependent on Mac computer sales....Mr. Cook is attempting a similar feat in the approaching twilight of the smartphone era....Cook wanted to know which apps were selling well, how many Apple Music subscribers stuck with the service, and how many people were signing up for iCloud storage.....Apple’s biggest source of services revenue comes from distributing other companies’ software through its App Store.....Apple’s music-streaming service has about 50 million global subscribers—far behind Spotify’s 96 million.

Apple’s base of 1.4 billion iPhones, iPads and Macs in use globally gives it a distribution platform..................The push into news subscriptions could help Apple battle Facebook, whose News Feed has helped it become the No. 1 app world-wide in monthly active smartphone users.....Facebook is attempting to become a super-app like China’s WeChat, which allows users to shop, order food, buy movie tickets and make reservations on any mobile operating system......Steve Jobs foreshadowed Apple’s services future when he started iTunes in 2001, offering categories from competing major labels to make the first successful digital-music store, with songs available for 99 cents.

For Mr. Cook’s monthly services meetings, the company monitors of apps that benefit and threaten Apple. There is a "release radar" for Cook to track apps that are expected to sell well and other metrics for the apps that have challenged Apple’s business, including iTunes sales decreases compared with Apple Music subscription growth.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_Music  big_bets  CEOs  cloud_computing  Disney  iCloud  iPhone  iTunes  magazines  mobile_applications  multiplatforms  Netflix  news  NYT  original_content  pivots  platforms  services  smartphones  Spotify  storage  streaming  subscriptions  television  Tim_Cook  WaPo  WeChat 
march 2019 by jerryking
John Doyle: This is no time to take a vacation from the news
AUGUST 21, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | JOHN DOYLE .

Today the volume of political news can be overwhelming, with crazy events amping up the news cycles ....There is genuine fatigue – and that's understandable – but it's wrong. The temptation is to twist all Trump-related news into one big tumbleweed of tedious acrimony and let it blow away. At this particular time of the year, a lot of people are on vacation and there is aversion to the ill-temper of it all. Best ignore the news, say many people....ignore it at our peril.....I was put in mind of the late Rob Ford, the former Toronto mayor.

Just a few years ago, in this neck if the woods, citizens of Toronto felt they were living in bewildering times. Analysis was beggared by the news as it unfolded – the Rob Ford fandango of revelations, accusations, apologies and freakouts. It was exhausting to watch, let alone cover it. Often, TV and print media covered the Ford situation by relying on the usual menu of some expert pontificating on the marketing and selling of politicians. This was comically useless in the Ford situation. There was no playbook. There were no rules. Does that ring a bell of recognition?....Mr. Ford held sway with his many supporters because, in part, he knew that in the digital age, a portion of the electorate only dips in and out of the news narrative. There's a bunch of people who don't know or care what's real and what's merely sensational half-truths or biased opinion – that became starkly evident during the Ford years in Toronto.

It's important not to be one of those people, not to give in to fatigue and tune out news coverage. If you paid close attention to the Ford phenomenon, you could see what was coming in the politics practised during the digital age. Rob Ford merely insulted the intelligence. Donald Trump is doing far worse than that. Pay attention.
John_Doyle  news  Rob_Ford  Donald_Trump  fatigue  politics  playbooks  pay_attention 
september 2017 by jerryking
Tech Wealth and Ideas Are Heading Into News
October 20, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By DAVID CARR

Silicon Valley and its various power brokers — some who had roles in putting the news business in harm’s way to begin with — are suddenly investing significant sums of money in preserving news capacity and quality. ... Next-generation news companies including Vice, Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider have all recently received significant investment. (In addition, Jeff Skoll, another eBay alum, backed Participant Media and now the TV channel Pivot, to make “socially relevant” films and television.)

The list goes on, but the trend is clear: quality news has become, if not sexy, suddenly attractive to smart digital money.....It does not take an M.B.A. to understand that the ability to capture consumers’ attention and move them around a platform, all the while extracting value, might come in handy in the media business. ITunes used cheap, uniformly priced content to animate the sales of devices like the iPod; Amazon used cheap devices like the Kindle to push lucrative content sales. EBay reduced the friction and suspicion between buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods. ...The willingness to answer bedeviling old questions in new ways does not ensure success, but it creates remarkable possibilities. “Both Jeff Bezos and Pierre Omidyar have a hacker’s ethos, a willingness to engage in lateral thinking to solve problems in a nonconventional way, to reject what has been taken for granted and MacGyver their way to solutions (aka mental_dexterity),” suggested Shane Snow, a founder of Contently, a marketplace for content creators.

Consider Amazon’s ability to lead consumers through a highly personalized array of choices.

“If you have a story that is read by a million people, that’s great, but how do you get those million people to read another story?” said Henry Blodget of Business Insider. “Amazon is extraordinary at customizing its site for every visitor. They do endless testing and understand stickiness and relevance in a way few media companies do.”

One of the secrets of Amazon (and Netflix) is that it never offered one site, but millions of customized sites. It is not hard to envision a carefully measured invitation at the bottom of a highly trafficked news article: “People who read this story are also reading ...” .
value_extraction  news  Silicon_Valley  moguls  entrepreneur  David_Carr  digital_media  Amazon  Second_Acts  disruption  Pierre_Omidyar  Jeff_Bezos  websites  personalization  Netflix  customization  testing  experimentation  growth_hacking  stickiness  relevance  newspapers  content  problem_solving  unconventional_thinking  smart_people  attention  Henry_Blodget  Contently  content_creators  power_brokers 
october 2013 by jerryking
Venerable Format of ‘NewsHour’ Struggles With New Era of Media - NYTimes.com
By ELIZABETH JENSEN
Published: June 13, 2013

With a deep financing crisis forcing layoffs and other cutbacks this week, some public television employees believe that PBS NewsHour's current format — and a general unwillingness to embrace the digital realities facing journalism — may be jeopardizing the program’s future.... The pressures facing “NewsHour” are not unique. “What every traditional media organization is confronted with today is how to change profoundly to reflect the revolution in how people consume media,” said a former CNN bureau chief, Frank Sesno, now director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. But many organizations have moved more quickly to adapt, equipping producers with inexpensive video cameras to reduce news gathering costs, and investing in online and mobile platforms.

Mr. Sesno said that he “desperately” wants “NewsHour” to succeed. “They’ve got to figure out how to do the deeper dive and bring people along with them,” he said, by developing more of a conversation with the audience and becoming a “multimedia information experience. You can’t just be a TV show anymore.”
PBS  television  digital_media  layoffs  cutbacks  mass_media  billgates  philanthropy  journalism  digital_strategies  news  multimedia  interactivity 
june 2013 by jerryking
Helping Hand for Time’s Print Empire
July 29, 2012 | NYT | By AMY CHOZICK.

Lang has homed in on the transition to mobile devices and the customizing of ads for marketers based on the vast amount of consumer data Time Inc. collects on readers. Her theory: if users’ personal information is a treasure trove for Silicon Valley businesses, it should be equally valuable to traditional media. ....Ms. Lang talks about Time Inc. not as a magazine publisher, but as a branded news and entertainment company. She believes she can sell digital products to advertisers tailored to a level of specificity not previously available....As the Digitas chief she turned a traditional direct-mail service into a business that built and placed digital ad campaigns customized for Web sites and social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook. She also helped start the “newfronts” that take place around the time of the TV network’s upfronts, where advertisers see the coming slate of TV shows, and connect advertisers to online companies like YouTube and Hulu....the focus seems to be on tailoring the company’s magazine properties around the digital consumer. Driving that plan is a trove of research that breaks down readers’ daily news cycle. The “Arc of the Day” study showed that in the morning readers want bite-size headlines and news flashes. In the afternoon, they are often at a desktop computer and want to grab a slide show or video, and at night they have time to engage in a deeper article. A related study also found that the average smartphone owner spends 1.4 hours a day waiting in line while browsing a device....Time Inc. had previously resisted a deal with Apple in part because it did not want to give up its control of subscriber data to the technology company.

But the deal fits Ms. Lang’s favorite refrain: “We need to be where our consumers are.”
magazines  digital_media  profile  CEOs  mass_media  data_driven  Publicis  advertising  TIME_Inc.  news  dayparting  print_journalism 
july 2012 by jerryking
Forbes.com: Queen Of Arts
Dirk Smillie, 01.10.05

Louise MacBain is buying up art publications around the world. Squeezing money from these titles will be an art in itself.
Louise Blouin MacBain just hates talking about her social life, which involves tabloid-fodder like dating Prince Andrew, entertaining Bianca Jagger and hosting dinner parties for European royalty.

What she really wants to gab about is her latest collecting passion. Over the past two years her Bermuda investment company, LTB Holdings, has snapped up 160 art titles in 20 countries, including the dominant Art + Auction magazine. That already makes her one of the biggest art publishers in the world.

Now she is laying out $20 million to launch a Web portal this summer, a kind of Bloomberg terminal for the arts, delivering breaking news from the auction and collecting worlds. "Globalization is connecting art and its buyers everywhere," she says. "There's no central news or information source covering them."
art  magazines  HBS  information_sources  publishing  news  print_journalism  auctions  collectors 
june 2012 by jerryking
Read All About It: News Apps Arrive - WSJ.com
DEC. 9, 2010 | WSJ | By SPENCER E. ANTE. In the news
category of the App Store, news readers such as Pulse, Flipboard &
SkyGrid occupy 5 of the top 10 positions. Both Pulse & Flipboard
claim at least 500,000 users, while SkyGrid claims it`s poised to pass 1
M users during 1Q11......These companies claim news readers provide a
way to keep newspaper and magazine content relevant in a mobile age and
might even help provide a new source of revenue for the industry by
driving traffic back to their websites. "We can help publishers on the
presentation of content and help readers become more engaged," said Mike
McCue, CEO of Flipboard....News readers are built on the news feeds
from publishers' websites. What is novel is how they present the
information in easy-to-read formats built specifically for the smaller
screens of mobile devices..... News apps easy sharing of articles
through Twitter & Facebook.
mobile_applications  newspapers  news  magazines  content  Kleiner_Perkins  Pulse  Flipboard  Skygrid  Spencer_Ante  digital_media 
december 2010 by jerryking
Crovitz: Now the News Finds You - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 20, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By L. GORDON
CROVITZ. Now the News Finds You . A Pew study finds people spend an
average of 70 minutes a day accessing new and old media.
news  newspapers  L._Gordon_Crovtiz 
september 2010 by jerryking
Startup brings mobile video to the masses
Jul. 26, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Grant Buckler. Ray Newal
founded Jigsee Inc. with a mission to “democratize” access to video
content.
mobile  video  news  Jigsee  digital_media  India  mobile_phones 
august 2010 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria GPS - CNN.com
BOOK OF THE WEEK
The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investing by Ian Bremmer and Preston Keat.
The Lords of Finance by Liaquat Ahamed
"It's about how we got into the last great depression, and it contains good lessons on how to avoid this new one."
Science and Government ~ The Godkin Lectures at Harvard University, 1960 by C.P. Snow.
US POLITICS
• "The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power" by David E. Sanger.
THE ECONOMY
• "The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World" by Niall Ferguson.

HISTORY
• "The Wise Men" by Walter Isaacson.
• "Imagining India: The Idea of a Nation Renewed" by Nandan Nilekani
SOCIOLOGY
• "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell
FOREIGN POLICY
• "Power Rules: How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy" by Leslie Gelb
news  media  geopolitics  Fareed_Zakaria  globalization  cnn  interviews  Great_Depression  Outliers  Malcolm_Gladwell  books  Ian_Bremmer  David_Sanger 
april 2009 by jerryking
Making Old Media New Again - WSJ.com
APRIL 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by L. GORDON CROVITZ

See Richard Tofel, "Restless Genius: Barney Kilgore, The Wall Street
Journal and the Invention of Modern Journalism."

The Journal changed. Technology increasingly meant readers would know
the basic facts of news as it happened. Kilgore crafted the front page
"What's News -- " column to summarize what had happened, but focused on
explaining what the news meant, outline the implications for the
economy, industry and commodity and financial markets.
5_W’s  books  creative_renewal  digital_media  financial_markets  implications  journalism  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  news  newspapers  print_journalism  WSJ 
april 2009 by jerryking
Innovation Watch - Trends, Innovation and the Future
Innovation Watch follows trends and speculates
about where they may be taking us. News feeds, multimedia, links,
books and articles explore what the future might look like.
technology  future  ideas  creativity  Trends  news  tech  innovation 
march 2009 by jerryking
Information Age: Bad News Is Better Than No News - WSJ.com
Jan. 26, 2009 WSJ column by L. Gordon Crovitz focuses on the
role that information gaps have played in fomenting the financial
crisis.
L._Gordon_Crovtiz  risks  news  VaR  crisis  information  uncertainty  information_gaps  bad_news 
january 2009 by jerryking

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