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jerryking : newspapers   77

Dead at 68: Christie Blatchford was a tenacious voice for victims, a thorn to the smugly comfortable
February 12, 2020 | | National Post | 8:30 AM EST.

Christie Blatchford, a powerful public voice through nearly five decades of journalism, has died after being diagnosed with cancer in November.

Blatchford was one of Canada’s most prominent writers, having been a leading journalist at each of Toronto’s daily newspapers, a trailblazer for women in sports reporting, an award-winning war correspondent, and a columnist renowned for her vexing mix of toughness and tenderness.

She was 68.
Christie_Blatchford  journalists  newspapers  obituaries  trailblazers  women 
5 days ago by jerryking
How the 1619 Project Came Together
Aug. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Lovia Gyarkye.

This month is the 400th anniversary of that ship’s arrival. To commemorate this historic moment and its legacy, The New York Times Magazine has dedicated an entire issue and special broadsheet section, out this Sunday, to exploring the history of slavery and mapping the ways in which it has touched nearly every aspect of contemporary life in the United States.

The 1619 Project began as an idea pitched by Nikole Hannah-Jones, one of the magazine’s staff writers, during a meeting in January.......it was a big task, one that would require the expertise of those who have dedicated their entire lives and careers to studying the nuances of what it means to be a black person in America. Ms. Hannah-Jones invited 18 scholars and historians — including Kellie Jones, a Columbia University art historian and 2016 MacArthur Fellow; Annette Gordon-Reed, a professor of law and history at Harvard; and William Darity, a professor of public policy at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University — to meet with editors and journalists at The Times early this year. The brainstorming session cemented key components of the issue, including what broad topics would be covered (for example, sugar, capitalism and cotton) and who would contribute (including Linda Villarosa, Bryan Stevenson and Khalil Gibran Muhammad). The feature stories were then chiseled by Ms. Hannah-Jones with the help of Ilena Silverman, the magazine’s features editor......Almost every contributor in the magazine and special section — writers, photographers and artists — is black, a nonnegotiable aspect of the project that helps underscore its thesis.......“A lot of ideas were considered, but ultimately we decided that there was an undeniable power in narrowing our focus to the very place that this issue kicks off,”.......even though slavery was formally abolished more than 150 years ago, its legacy has remained insidious. .....The special section.... went through several iterations before it was decided that it would focus on painting a more full, but by no means comprehensive, picture of the institution of slavery itself.......The 1619 Project is first and foremost an invitation to reframe how the country discusses the role and history of its black citizens. “

========================================================
The 1619 Project is, by far, one of the most ambitious and courageous pieces of journalism that I have ever encountered. It addresses American history as it really is: America pretended to be a democracy at its founding, yet our country practices racism through its laws, policies, systems and institutions. Our nation still wrestles with this conflict of identities. The myth of The Greatest Nation blinds us to the historical, juxtaposed reality of the legacy of slavery, racism and democracy, and the sad, inalienable fact that racism and white supremacy were at the root of this nation’s founding.
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KM
Well, look forward to 4 more years of Trump I guess. The Times' insistence on reducing all of American history to slavery is far more blind and dogmatic than previous narratives which supposedly did not give it enough prominence. The North was already an industrial powerhouse without slavery, and continued to develop with the aid of millions of European immigrants who found both exploitation but also often the American dream, and their descendents were rightly known as the greatest generation. I celebrate a country that was more open to immigrants than most, and that was more democratic than most, rather than obsess about its imperfections, since they pale against the imperfections of every other country on the planet.
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Linda
Aug. 19
@KM Can't let your comments go as the voice of Pittsburgh on this forum, so must register my disagreement with your comments as a different voice in Pittsburgh. FYI, my white immigrant ancestors toiled in the coal mines of western PA, so I'm aware of the work of the European immigrants. But I am grateful to have my eyes opened on many topics through Sunday's paper. Slavery is a deeply shameful chapter in our history. If trying to come to terms with the living legacy of that abominable chapter is "obsessing about its imperfections," then I hope I may be called an obsessive.
African-Americans  anniversaries  commemoration  focus  history  howto  journalism  legacies  newspapers  NYT  photography  slavery  storytelling 
august 2019 by jerryking
Opinion: George Brown, the futurist
July 1, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by MOIRA DANN, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Memories of the people present for Canada’s beginnings can teach us a great deal. Sometimes looking back helps you reconsider and reframe the present, so you can see different possibilities for the future.....George Brown often gets short shrift as a Father of Confederation.....know he was the founder of The Globe, let alone a founder of the country.....Brown wasn’t the charismatic lightning rod his confrère and rival John A. Macdonald was, nor was he as ready to dance and sing and flirt and play his own compositions on the piano, as was his Quebec frenemy, George-Étienne Cartier..... he was the most forward-looking of the lot......Brown came to Toronto from Scotland in 1843 via a short, five-year sojourn in New York working in dry goods and publishing.......It wasn’t long before Brown, defending the principle of the government’s responsibility to Parliament, was haranguing Governor-General Charles Metcalfe about public-service appointments made without the approval of the elected representatives. Brown soon enough made the leap from journalism to politics. ...... he was back wearing his journalist’s hat in 1867, writing a 9,000-word front-page editorial for The Globe’s July 1 edition when Canada’s Confederation became a political reality......While still publishing and writing for political-reform-minded Presbyterian church publication The Banner, Brown had foreseen a market trend: He anticipated the desire for (and the money-making potential of) a good newspaper directed less toward partisan believers and more at a general reader, a paper with a strong point of view and attempting a national perspective. He started The Globe on March 5, 1844.......After Brown started The Globe – it merged, in 1936, with the Mail and Empire, to become the newspaper that you are reading today – he was able to print and distribute it widely to extol Confederation because of some forethought: He had started investing in new technology. Just two months after starting The Globe using a hand press that printed 200 copies an hour, he went to New York and purchased a Hoe rotary press that could produce 1,250 copies an hour. His was the first one used in Upper Canada. He also made a deal with a rival publication, the British Colonist, to share the cost of using the telegraph to bring news from New York and Montreal......One thing Brown never allowed to lapse was his dedication to religious liberty, civil rights and the abolition of slavery. .....Brown was also a vocal advocate of prison reform...... the work he most loved: being husband to Anne and father to Margaret (Maggie), Catherine Edith (Oda) and George.
abolitionists  ahead_of_the_curve  Confederation  forethought  futurists  George_Brown  George-Étienne_Cartier  Globe_&_Mail  history  journalists  nation_builders  newspapers  politicians  prison_reform  Sir_John_A._MacDonald  technology 
july 2019 by jerryking
Torstar cuts jobs, internship programs; board chair says the company is fighting for survival - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | |

Torstar Corp. is fighting for survival......The struggles precipitated by declining print advertising, and by a booming digital economy that has been dominated largely by Facebook and Google – at the expense of others who would survive on digital advertising – have led to widespread job cuts. On Monday, the company tightened its belt one more notch, cutting 13 jobs in its digital and sales operations, slashing the Toronto Star's travel and freelance budgets and suspending its summer and year-long internship programs. The Star's internships were among the most prestigious in the country for training young journalists.

While cutting costs, Torstar is also attempting to establish its digital future....... What is your view of the impact consolidation has had in Canadian media? How much more consolidation is to come?

As you know, we just announced a consolidation deal. [In November, Torstar and Postmedia Network Canada Corp. swapped 41 newspapers and subsequently shut down most of them.] Publishing newspapers – dailies and weeklies – is becoming more and more challenging. In an effort to lengthen the runway, give us more time, these amalgamation deals have been done.
Susan_Krashinsky  Torstar  digital_media  digital_strategies  newspapers  digital_first  cost-cutting  subscriptions  paywalls  layoffs  consolidation 
february 2018 by jerryking
The Globe and Mail’s Self-Sabotage
SEP. 1, 2017 | The Walrus | BY LAUREN MCKEON.

By firing two popular female columnists in a bid to save money, our newspaper of record may pay a bigger price: its increasing irrelevance.....The idea that the paper belongs to its male readers and its male journalists appears so deeply ingrained in the Globe—and Canadian media—that it has become utterly unremarkable. Of the Globe’s remaining columnists—that we know of, at least—fifteen are men and seven are women. As has been previously reported, they are all overwhelmingly white. And it doesn’t help matters that of the ten editors on the Globe’s masthead, only three are women.
But this goes beyond questions of representation. The Globe isn’t merely failing women; it’s failing, period. Just days before news of Southey and McLaren leaked, the Globe had been busy shrinking other sections of the newspaper. When it comes to the paper’s weekday print edition, management decided to keep the Globe’s news and business sections as standalones, but sports, as well as life and arts coverage, will no longer exist as their own territories— they’ll be folded into the other two. This, in turn, comes on the heels of a decision to cut the paper’s Atlantic print edition for the end of November. If Canada’s paper of record is in survival mode, then, I’m curious: who exactly is it surviving for?
Globe_&_Mail  firings  women  self-sabotage  newspapers  irrelevance  Leah_McLaren 
october 2017 by jerryking
20 Years On, Amazon and Jeff Bezos Prove Naysayers Wrong - The New York Times
Andrew Ross Sorkin
DEALBOOK MAY 15, 2017

Twenty years ago this week, Amazon.com went public........Here we are, 20 years later, and Mr. Bezos has an authentic, legitimate claim on having changed the way we live.

He has changed the way we shop. He has changed the way companies use computers, by moving much of their information and systems to cloud services. He’s even changed the way we interact with computers by voice: “Alexa!”......he has bought — and fixed — The Washington Post,.........Most executives are worried about the next quarter, but Mr. Bezos is worried about what will happen years from now. That is a competitive advantage that many chief executives could learn from.

“If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people,” Mr. Bezos told Wired in 2011. Here, he was expressing the view that some chief executives think in three-year cycles — a relatively generous assessment, given that most top executives don’t last many more years than that.

“But,” he continued, “if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people, because very few companies are willing to do that.”....Is Mr. Bezos an easy boss? Hardly. He is unbelievably demanding. ......I’m supposed to hate Mr. Bezos. After all, he has pressured publishers, cut their margins and practically put old-school bookstores out of business. As if to rub it in, he’s now introducing bricks-and-mortar Amazon bookstores.

But to take that view would be to misunderstand what innovation looks like. It upends industries — witness the current carnage in the retail industry, which has been outmoded by Amazon and all the companies trying to copy it.

“Amazon is not happening to book selling,” Mr. Bezos explained, defending his role in a 2013 interview with Charlie Rose. “The future is happening to book selling.” And the future is now happening to retail stores and even supermarkets — Mr. Bezos’ next conquest. And the future is clearly happening to enterprise computing.
Andrew_Sorkin  Jeff_Bezos  Amazon  WaPo  newspapers  e-commerce  anniversaries  moguls  trailblazers  time_horizons  cloud_computing  Alexa  long-term  Warren_Buffett  innovation 
may 2017 by jerryking
When local news outlets shutter due to cuts, we all lose - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Apr. 01, 2017

Local journalism, whether it’s at a city paper or a weekly, a radio or TV station, keeps its community entertained and informed. The National isn’t going to send a camera crew to cover the profoundly annoying pothole on Main Street, or the feud between the dress-shop owners, or the cozy relationship between the mayor and the developers. The Globe and Mail is not likely to, either: This is where the country’s 1,060 community papers come in – or where they used to. According to a recent report, those papers lost $400-million, or one-third of their revenue, between 2012 and 2015. The Public Policy Forum’s recent report on media in Canada, called The Shattered Mirror, contains an even more alarming statistic: “Since 2010, there have been 225 weekly and 27 daily newspapers lost to closure or merger in more than 200 federal ridings.” Local television coverage has contracted as well.

“Well, so what?” you might ask. Your neighbourhood has a Facebook page. The mayor has a Twitter account. Except that none of your neighbours is going to sit through a long and boring zoning meeting and report back (unless he is particularly weird). And the mayor’s Twitter feed? Undeniably good if you’re looking for sunshine and kittens. Not so good for anything she doesn’t want you to see. When provincial legislatures and city councils are left unwatched, it also means no one is keeping an eye on the sausage-making machine of democracy......The problem of fleeing ad dollars and subscribers won’t be settled so easily, either: The industry has struggled with these pains for years. Not-for-profit foundations that run news outlets might be one idea, or hyper-local websites that are crowdsourced by neighbours.....In his farewell column, Kevin Diakiw wrote, “Moving forward, you will likely receive your information from the Internet, or newsrooms pared to the bone. Be sure to read not only information that fits your own narrative, but opposing views as well.

“The weighty responsibility of hunting for balance and accuracy now lands largely on your shoulders.”
newspapers  rural  community  journalism  opposing_actions  journalists  provincial_legislatures  engaged_citizenry  city_councils  local  print_journalism  subscriptions  dual-consciousness  Postmedia  consolidation  local_journalism 
april 2017 by jerryking
Gazette shifts gears with format change - Western Alumni
 Spring 2015
Gazette shifts gears with format change

by Paul Wells, BA'8
UWO  newspapers  Colleges_&_Universities 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Struggle Inside The Wall Street Journal
FEB. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | David Leonhardt.

The Journal’s newsroom is embroiled in a fight over the paper’s direction.

Many staff members believe that the paper’s top editor, Gerard Baker, previously a feisty conservative commentator, is trying to Murdoch-ize the paper. “There is a systemic issue,” one reporter told me. The dissatisfaction went public last week, with stories in Politico and the Huffington Post. At a staff meeting on Monday, Baker dismissed the criticism as “fake news,” Joe Pompeo and Hadas Gold of Politico reported.

As a longtime reader, admirer and competitor of The Journal, I think the internal critics are right. You can see the news pages becoming more politicized. You can also see The Journal’s staff pushing back, through both great journalism (including exposes on the Trump administration) and quiet insubordination.....The Journal’s opinion pages, of course, have long been conservative. And they have their own tensions: An editor critical of Trump was recently fired, The Atlantic reported. But The Journal’s news pages, like those of The New York Times, The Washington Post and elsewhere, have aspired to objectivity.

One way to understand the fight is through the lens of Fox News. Its former leader, Roger Ailes, knew that the country had become more polarized and that many viewers didn’t want sober objectivity. He also knew that most reporters leaned left, and their beliefs sometimes seeped into coverage.
WSJ  newspapers  Rupert_Murdoch  financial_journalism  biases  WaPo  internal_politics 
february 2017 by jerryking
More Wretched News for Newspapers as Advertising Woes Drive Anxiety - The New York Times
By SYDNEY EMBER OCT. 27, 2016

With print advertising continuing to drop precipitously, you would be hard-pressed to find a newsroom devoid of uncertainty anywhere in the country....Across the country, those working in the newspaper industry are fretting as the end of the year approaches. Driving much of the anxiety is a steep drop in print ad revenue, once the lifeblood for newspapers....At the same time, digital advertising and other forms of revenue have been slow to pick up the slack, leading news companies, including The New York Times, The Guardian and Gannett, the owner of USA Today, to cut costs by downsizing....Across the industry, similar declines in print advertising coupled with the shift to digital and, increasingly, mobile, are driving newspaper companies to reconfigure their newsrooms. ...The Times has also announced its intent to make subscriptions the driving source of its revenue...
newspapers  advertising  layoffs  WSJ  NYT  digital_media  cost-cutting  subscriptions  print_journalism 
october 2016 by jerryking
Fascination and Fear: Covering the Black Panthers - The New York Times
By GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO
OCT. 15, 2016“At the same time the newspaper was dubious and skeptical of them, it also gave them a tremendous amount of coverage,” said Jane Rhodes, a professor of African-American studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the author of “Framing the Black Panthers: The Spectacular Rise of a Black Power Icon.”

“The media, like most of white America, was deeply frightened by their aggressive and assertive style of protest,” Professor Rhodes said. “And they were offended by it.”

When Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party, their first goal was to confront what they saw as an epidemic of police brutality. They took to the streets with rifles, standing guard over policemen on patrol. The California Assembly responded quickly, proposing a law to ban the open carrying of firearms.....Looking at contemporary news coverage, Professor Rhodes said progress has been made when it comes to covering race and activism. “I see organizations like The Times making a much more sustained effort at deeper coverage,” she said. But articles still tend to emphasize the conflict between the police and protesters, she said, without addressing the core principles guiding social movements such as Black Lives Matter: greater investment in public education, community control of law enforcement and economic justice.
Black_Panthers  African-Americans  '60s  fear  FBI  public_opinion  NYT  newspapers  disinformation  biases  books  iconic  Black_Power 
october 2016 by jerryking
Fast Response to ‘Brexit’ News: A Pop-Up Paper Finds Success in Britain - The New York Times
By NICOLA CLARK SEPT. 13, 2016 | NYT |

“It kind of dawned on me: Here was an audience that was so clearly identifiable and passionate,” said Mr. Kelly, a longtime British newspaper executive who is now chief content officer of Archant, a large British newspaper group. “If there ever was a time for launching a new newspaper, this is it.”

Less than two weeks later, in early July, The New European, a weekly print newspaper, hit newsstands nationwide. The paper, conceived as a finite, monthlong experiment, is now going into its 11th week after proving a surprisingly profitable hit with readers.....Some midsize publishers have focused on portfolios of smaller-scale titles that can be produced using the same infrastructure of presses, distribution and marketing networks. Those economies of scale can significantly reduce the marginal costs — and the risks — of developing new print products....earlier experiments, aimed at general-interest audiences, failed to capture enough demand from readers and advertisers to justify their publishers’ relatively modest initial investments....The New European was conceived as a niche publication--the 48 % of Britons who voted on June 23 to stay in the European Union Since it was meant to be short-lived, Archant avoided spending huge sums on market research or publicity campaigns. “We never set out to actually create a long-term brand,” “The way we structured it was to make money on a four-week run.....successful pop-up titles could be linked to popular political or social movements, or major sporting events like last month’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.
pop-ups  newspapers  digital_media  Brexit  experimentation  new_products  product_launches  United_Kingdom  economies_of_scale  epiphanies  event-driven  events  social_movements  contextual  cost-structure  print_journalism  short-term  niches  short-lived  sports 
september 2016 by jerryking
How The New York Times lost the internet, and how it plans to win it back - Vox
What's Page One? What's digital first?

The first page of the print edition of the newspaper is known as Page One with capital letters. The report details the extent to which Page One is the heart of the daily routine of the newsroom, with the most important editorial meeting also being called Page One, and reporters and editorial groups assessing themselves largely in terms of their ability to score Page One stories. This remains the case even though digital is not just the future of the New York Times but largely its present. The Times' digital audience dwarfs its print subscriber base, but the editorial workflow is built around Page One and the newspaper.

The report urges a "digital first" strategy and emphasizes that this means more than literally putting a story on the internet before it appears in a print newspaper. Digital first is a state of mind in which the job of the newsroom is to deliver an excellent digital product, which a relatively small team would then repackage as a daily print product. Today it's largely the reverse. Deadlines are structured around the pace of print, incentives are structured around Page One, and then teams of producers build a website out of what's really a print workflow.
newspapers  digital_media  digital_first  NYT  disruption  perspectives  mindsets  mobile_first  digital_strategies 
may 2016 by jerryking
An Old-Media Empire, Axel Springer Reboots for the Digital Age - The New York Times
DEC. 20, 2015 | NYT | By NICOLA CLARK.

When Axel Springer CEO, Mathias Döpfner, and a handful of his top managers first set their sights on the US three years ago, it was with notebooks in hand, rather than checkbooks.

A decade after taking the helm in 2002, Mr. Döpfner had already made significant strides in revamping Germany’s largest print publishing group for the digital age. ...Still, Mr. Döpfner, 52, worried that the company’s management culture was too hierarchical and risk-averse, leaving it vulnerable to challenges from nimbler American technology companies like Google and Facebook, as well as rising digital media brands like BuzzFeed and Vice....“It was very clear to me that we needed to accelerate our cultural transformation"...instead of enlisting an army of high-priced consultants, Mr. Döpfner opted for the corporate equivalent of electroshock therapy. In the summer of 2012, he sent three of Axel Springer’s most senior managers to California (Silicon Valley) for nine months. ...Digital activities now generate more than 60% of Axel Springer’s revenues and just over 70% of its operating profit. Mr. Döpfner’s boldest pursuit in the last year was one that ultimately failed. Over the summer, Axel Springer lost out in a bid to acquire The Financial Times, beaten in the final stages by a $1.3 billion offer from the Japanese publisher Nikkei.... the recent scramble among the world’s big media groups for new — and in many cases, unproven — digital companies has driven up valuations, and some analysts warn that Axel Springer’s investment-led strategy represents a potentially high-cost gamble....“Digital companies today are selling for huge multiples, but they also have a high failure rate. Many are literally fireflies.”...
digital_media  Axel_Springer  Silicon_Valley  publishing  newspapers  failure  sclerotic  Airbnb  experimentation  organizational_culture  Germany  German  digital_disruption 
december 2015 by jerryking
The Financial Times and the Future of Journalism - The New Yorker
SEPTEMBER 28, 2015
The Financial Times and the Future of Journalism
BY JOHN CASSIDY
financial  FT  newspapers  journalism 
september 2015 by jerryking
David Carr, a Journalist at the Center of the Sweet Spot - NYTimes.com
By A. O. SCOTTFEB. 13, 2015

David’s public contribution to the profession — his columns and feature stories, his interviews and investigations — is part of the record, and part of the glory of this newspaper. He covered every corner of the media business (including, sometimes, his own employer) with analytical acumen, ethical rigor and gumshoe tenacity.

He managed to see the complexities of digital-age journalism from every angle, and to write about it with unparalleled clarity and wit.

....“What else?” was the question that would punctuate every conversation with him. What were you working on? What did you think of this or that political event, show-business caper or piece of office gossip? How was your family? What were you thinking? This was sincere, friendly curiosity, the expression of a naturally gregarious temperament. But it was also the operation of a tireless journalistic instinct. David was always hungry for stories. He was a collector of personalities and anecdotes, a shrewd and compassionate judge of character. A warrior for the truth.
David_Carr  journalists  journalism  tributes  business_acumen  obituaries  digital_media  NYT  newspapers  curiosity  questions  memoirists  anecdotal 
february 2015 by jerryking
Tech Wealth and Ideas Are Heading Into News
October 20, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By DAVID CARR

Silicon Valley and its various power brokers — some who had roles in putting the news business in harm’s way to begin with — are suddenly investing significant sums of money in preserving news capacity and quality. ... Next-generation news companies including Vice, Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider have all recently received significant investment. (In addition, Jeff Skoll, another eBay alum, backed Participant Media and now the TV channel Pivot, to make “socially relevant” films and television.)

The list goes on, but the trend is clear: quality news has become, if not sexy, suddenly attractive to smart digital money.....It does not take an M.B.A. to understand that the ability to capture consumers’ attention and move them around a platform, all the while extracting value, might come in handy in the media business. ITunes used cheap, uniformly priced content to animate the sales of devices like the iPod; Amazon used cheap devices like the Kindle to push lucrative content sales. EBay reduced the friction and suspicion between buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods. ...The willingness to answer bedeviling old questions in new ways does not ensure success, but it creates remarkable possibilities. “Both Jeff Bezos and Pierre Omidyar have a hacker’s ethos, a willingness to engage in lateral thinking to solve problems in a nonconventional way, to reject what has been taken for granted and MacGyver their way to solutions (aka mental_dexterity),” suggested Shane Snow, a founder of Contently, a marketplace for content creators.

Consider Amazon’s ability to lead consumers through a highly personalized array of choices.

“If you have a story that is read by a million people, that’s great, but how do you get those million people to read another story?” said Henry Blodget of Business Insider. “Amazon is extraordinary at customizing its site for every visitor. They do endless testing and understand stickiness and relevance in a way few media companies do.”

One of the secrets of Amazon (and Netflix) is that it never offered one site, but millions of customized sites. It is not hard to envision a carefully measured invitation at the bottom of a highly trafficked news article: “People who read this story are also reading ...” .
news  Silicon_Valley  moguls  entrepreneur  David_Carr  digital_media  Amazon  Second_Acts  disruption  Pierre_Omidyar  Jeff_Bezos  websites  personalization  Netflix  customization  testing  experimentation  growth_hacking  stickiness  relevance  newspapers  content  problem_solving  unconventional_thinking  smart_people  attention  Henry_Blodget  Contently  content_creators  power_brokers 
october 2013 by jerryking
Inside the D.C. bubble – stupid, slimy, savvy
Aug. 10 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski.

Mark Leibovich’s This Town betrays just about everything despicable about Washington’s political culture.

Politico’s business model lies not in pursuing high-minded Watergate-style journalism or even beating the Post in circulation or unique Web visitors. Fewer than 40,000 copies of its free print edition are distributed on the streets of Washington. Its content is aimed squarely at “The Club.”

In a new insider account of Washington, Mark Leibovich explains how The Club consists of the “spinning cabal of people in politics and media and the supporting sectors that never get voted out or term-limited or, God forbid, decide on their own that it is time to return home to the farm.”

The journalists, lobbyists, political consultants, White House aides, Capitol Hill staffers, socialites and persons-of-no-fixed-profession Mr. Leibovich profiles in This Town embody just about everything despicable about the D.C. bubble.....Playbook is the daily D.C. cheat sheet. Compiled by Politico’s Mike Allen, it summarizes the top news stories, parties, lobbying and book deals, staff changes, birthdays and nuptials of interest to The Club. And no one solicits mentions in Playbook – whose main corporate sponsor of late has been Keystone XL pipeline proponent TransCanada – as covetously as Robert Barnett.
Washington_D.C.  WaPo  Konrad_Yakabuski  sophisticated  start_ups  newspapers  business_models  politics  journalists  lobbyists  political_consultants  political_culture  books  Inside_the_Beltway  White_House  market_intelligence  newsstand_circulation  playbooks 
august 2013 by jerryking
Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for Washington Post - WSJ.com
August 6, 2013 | WSJ | By KEACH HAGEY and GREG BENSINGER

Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for the Post
Amazon Founder Brings Skills in Data Gathering, Software, E-Commerce


Mr. Bezos bought the paper in a personal capacity, many media-industry experts expressed optimism that the Amazon.com Inc. AMZN -1.23% founder will be able to apply to the Post the same software development, data gathering and e-commerce chops—as well as his patient investment philosophy—that turned his company into a powerhouse.

"Building audience, personalizing the offering, and, certainly, monetization," those are the core competencies that Jeff Bezos and Amazon have developed,
newspapers  turnarounds  software  e-commerce  data  Jeff_Bezos  WaPo  strategic_patience  core_competencies 
august 2013 by jerryking
Editor Neil Reynolds fought for free speech and liberty - The Globe and Mail
GEORGE FETHERLING


Special to The Globe and Mail

Published
Tuesday, May. 21 2013,
obituaries  journalists  newspapers 
may 2013 by jerryking
The Globe to roll out metered paywall as industry shifts to digital revenue - The Globe and Mail
STEVE LADURANTAYE - MEDIA REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Oct. 15 2012
paywalls  newspapers 
october 2012 by jerryking
Wondering How Far Magazines Must Fall
August 12, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Because of changes to the informational ecosystem, weeklies have been forced to leave behind the news and become magazines of ideas. Ms. Brown understood that; it’s just that some of her ideas weren’t always very good...The problem is not Tina Brown or her conceptual obsessions, or even the calcified formula of the weekly magazine.

The problem is more existential than that: magazines, all kinds of them, don’t work very well in the marketplace anymore.

Like newspapers, magazines have been in a steady slide, but now, like newspapers, they seem to have reached the edge of the cliff. Last week, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported that newsstand circulation in the first half of the year was down almost 10 percent. When 10 percent of your retail buyers depart over the course of a year, something fundamental is at work....It’s not just consumers who are playing hard to get: advertising is down 8.8 percent year to date over the same miserable period a year ago, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. With readership in such steep decline and advertising refusing to come back, magazines are in a downward spiral that not even their new digital initiatives can halt.
reinvention  magazines  David_Carr  future  digital_media  Tina_Brown  ideas  newsstand_circulation  advertising  downward_spirals  structural_change  print_journalism  seismic_shifts  newspapers  decline  digital_disruption 
august 2012 by jerryking
A Report to The Wall Street Journal's World-Wide Readers - WSJ.com
What Won't Change

That's what will change. Let me tell you what won't: We won't use color for color's sake, or merely to entertain you. That's not the Journal, and it never will be. Instead, we'll use color to convey more information, particularly in graphs, charts and tables, and to help you navigate your way more quickly and easily to and through those parts of the paper that matter most to you.

We won't "dumb down" The Wall Street Journal. This publication isn't for everybody, and we don't intend for it to be. Instead, it's written, edited and published for a broad community of women and men in business and seriously interested in the world of business -- and now, also, the "business of life." It's intended to be sophisticated and thoughtful and thought-provoking, and unapologetic about all of that. It's often clever, sometimes playful, but never shallow or silly. In a world sometimes overwhelmed with trivialities, our readers don't need any more trivia, and we don't intend to provide it to them.
wsj  9/11  newspapers  critical_thinking  sophisticated  worthiness  discernment  trivia 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Disruption Opportunity
Summer 2003 | MIT Sloan Management Review | By Clark Gilbert

Three Phases of Disruption
Finding new customers
Realizing New Growth

(1) Disruption creates new net growth
(2) New customers must be found outside the established market.
(3) Disruptive technology is never disruptive to the customers who buy it.
(4) The new customer will make the disruptive path clear.
(5) A disruptive new business should start small and not be forced to grow quickly.
disruption  HBS  Clayton_Christensen  IBM  growth  newspapers  cardiovascular  customer_acquisition  new_businesses 
april 2012 by jerryking
Crovitz: Steve Jobs and the Future of Newspapers - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 9, 2011 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.

Steve Jobs and the Future of Newspapers
He loved the printed product but told me 'our lives are not like that anymore.'
Like this c
Steve_Jobs  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  future  newspapers 
october 2011 by jerryking
N.Y. Times unveils pay wall: Canada first - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY — MEDIA REPORTER
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Mar. 17, 2011
newspapers  NYT  pay_walls  media 
march 2011 by jerryking
Read All About It: News Apps Arrive - WSJ.com
DEC. 9, 2010 | WSJ | By SPENCER E. ANTE. In the news
category of the App Store, news readers such as Pulse, Flipboard &
SkyGrid occupy 5 of the top 10 positions. Both Pulse & Flipboard
claim at least 500,000 users, while SkyGrid claims it`s poised to pass 1
M users during 1Q11......These companies claim news readers provide a
way to keep newspaper and magazine content relevant in a mobile age and
might even help provide a new source of revenue for the industry by
driving traffic back to their websites. "We can help publishers on the
presentation of content and help readers become more engaged," said Mike
McCue, CEO of Flipboard....News readers are built on the news feeds
from publishers' websites. What is novel is how they present the
information in easy-to-read formats built specifically for the smaller
screens of mobile devices..... News apps easy sharing of articles
through Twitter & Facebook.
mobile_applications  newspapers  news  magazines  content  Kleiner_Perkins  Pulse  Flipboard  Skygrid  Spencer_Ante  digital_media 
december 2010 by jerryking
The weekend Globe – bigger, bolder, better - The Globe and Mail
October 1, 2010 | Globe and Mail Update | John Stackhouse,
Editor-in-chief. A great newspaper must speak to the soul of every great
conversation. We are doing that starting today with an eight-week
project: debates Canada needs to have, not about the issues of our past,
but that will determine our future .... It's not just our views. If
you go to our website, you'll find discussion forums on each of these
topics. They've been raging for months, involving 800 Globe readers
sharing ideas with each other and our reporters to challenge and improve
our journalism. It's a beginning. In the months ahead, our website will
be the focus of informed and reasonable debate about the many passions
of our readers and concerns of our nation. Follow the debates, in print
and online, and then launch your own, if you have the courage to lead.
John_Stackhouse  Globe_&_Mail  newspapers  redesign  UFSC 
october 2010 by jerryking
A new Globe – in print and online
October 1, 2010 | Globe & Mail | John Stackhouse, Editor-in-chief
John_Stackhouse  redesign  newspapers 
october 2010 by jerryking
A new Globe, but timeless principles
Sep. 30, 2010 | G&M | Editorial. We aim to be at the
centre of debate in public affairs, & also to probe the issues &
passions that matter to Canadians in their personal lives....Above all,
we try to explain Canada to Canadians & contribute to its life as a
liberal democracy & a liberal economy. We believe in a Parliament
that answers to the people, rather than executive power, and protects
the freedoms of speech & commerce....Our website today is different,
too,, building on globeandmail.com's award as the best
newspaper-affiliated site in the world. Today it has more matter, depth
and resources, from community groups to financial tools to Emmy
Award-winning videos. Together, the changes in print and online are
based on technology: new presses for the newspaper, and rapidly
expanding h/w and s/w for our websites, mobile channels and tablet apps.
But technology cannot replace human journalism, the basic task of
finding answers to the great questions of the times.
newspapers  inspiration  redesign  editorials  public_affairs  credos  websites  journalists  journalism  Globe_&_Mail 
october 2010 by jerryking
Tip Sheet: Advocacy Advertising: More Than Slightly Alive
Sep 22, 2008.! PR News. ! Anonymous. Cost-conscious clients
make the fatal error of thinking earned media is a better route because
it is free media, as opposed to advertising (paid media). The most
ambitious earned media campaign can be more expensive and less effective
as a well-thought-out ad campaign. No longer can a clients measure the
success of an advocacy campaign solely by the # of news hits. Because
clients love metrics, they are drawn to many of the newer online tactics
that crank out multiple reports about how their msg. fared on the Web.
But before anyone writes the obituary on print publications, they may
want to consider that lawmakers, especially on Capitol Hill, continue to
rely on must-read publications, including The Hill, The Politico,
National Journal and The Weekly Standard. An October 2007 Nielsen
study, "Trust in Advertising," noted that ads in newspapers ranked
second worldwide among all media categories.
ProQuest  advertising  advocacy  metrics  newspapers  cause_marketing  campaigns  effectiveness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Crovitz: Now the News Finds You - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 20, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By L. GORDON
CROVITZ. Now the News Finds You . A Pew study finds people spend an
average of 70 minutes a day accessing new and old media.
news  newspapers  L._Gordon_Crovtiz 
september 2010 by jerryking
Some Newspapers Shift Coverage After Tracking Readers Online - NYTimes.com
September 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JEREMY W.
PETERS. In most businesses, not knowing how well a particular product
is performing would be almost unthinkable. Now, because of technology
newspapers can pinpoint what people online are viewing and commenting
on, how much time they spend with an article and even how much money an
article makes in advertising revenue, newspapers can make more
scientific decisions about allocating their ever scarcer resources.
...reader metrics as a tool to help him better determine how to use
online resources.

“We ask, ‘What can we do online to make it more attractive?” ’ Mr.
Narisetti said. “Can we do podcasts? Can we do a photo gallery? Can we
do any kind of user-generated content?”
newspapers  data_driven  online  ufsc  unthinkable  resource_allocation  user_generated  print_journalism  decision_making 
september 2010 by jerryking
Get Me Rewrite! Hyperlocal's Lost
Sep 2009 | Fast Company. , Iss. 138; pg. 52, 3 pgs | by Michael Gluckstadt.
ProQuest  hyperlocal  business_models  online_advertising  City_Voice  newspapers 
july 2010 by jerryking
Make your proposals pop
December 3, 2007 | The Globe & Mail | by Harvey
Schachter. Study newspapers and magazine if you want to improve your
proposals to customers. That's the advice of consultant Mel Lester, who
says leading newspapers and magazines can show you how to clearly convey
information efficiently to readers.
proposals  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  Harvey_Schachter  newspapers 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Last Tycoon? - WSJ.com
April 9, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.
Op-ed on Sam Zell's bid to buy the Chicago Tribune. Owning a newspaper,
not as one's principal source of income but as a sideline of sorts, has
in recent years attracted lots of very rich men (Zellionaires, one
might henceforth think of them). Mortimer Zuckerman appears to derive
much pleasure from owning the New York Daily News, a hedge-funder named
Michael Steinhardt has a large investment in the New York Sun on which
he hoped for more than mere financial returns; David Geffen and Ronald
Burkle have declared their eagerness to acquire the Los Angeles Times,
now owned by Mr. Zell.
newspapers  Jewish  Sam_Zell  hubris  real_estate  moguls 
february 2010 by jerryking
A bull in bear's clothing
May 2007 | Report on Business Magazine | by BOYD ERMAN. "He
rises every morning by 5 a.m. to plow through three newspapers—The Globe
and Mail, National Post and The Wall Street Journal, before getting
into all the research that accumulates on his desk each day. Other
people may run their funds with computer modelling and game theory;
Sprott attaches clippings to his missives for investors. "I'm always
shocked that you can read things in the newspaper that prove to be
incredibly valuable, that a lot of people miss," he says."
Eric_Sprott  profile  Bay_Street  moguls  reading  newspapers  WSJ  insights  Globe_&_Mail 
february 2010 by jerryking
Remembering my father
November 1, 2009 | Stabroek News | By Brendan de Caires
Guyana  newspapers  reminiscing  obituaries 
november 2009 by jerryking
How does U.S. democracy survive without its newspapers?
Tuesday, Jun. 16, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | by John Ibbotson.

The Globe has also still been spared the savage budget cuts that eviscerated so many once-great American newspapers as the recession accelerated chronic declines in readership and advertising revenue.

But in the U.S., it's time to ask: How will the seemingly inevitable extinction of many metropolitan daily newspapers influence politics and political culture there?

The answer isn't entirely grim. Some newspapers are bound to survive in print form, at least for a few more years, as competition thins and enlightened corporate owners recognize that laying off half their reporters is the surest way to destroy the only thing of value a newspaper has: the reputation behind its name.....there is another, very disturbing, trend. A recent survey by The Pew Center for the People and the Press reported that "a new Washington media have evolved, but they are far from the more egalitarian or citizen-based media that advocates of the digital age might imagine. Instead, this new Washington media cohort is one substantially aimed at elites, often organized by industry, by corporate client, or by niche political interest."

These publications may have an audience of a few thousand, or even a few hundred, willing to pay thousands of dollars in subscription fees for specialized coverage. "These are publications with names like ClimateWire, Energy Trader, Traffic World, Government Executive and Food and Chemical News," the Pew study says. They are proliferating, and hoovering up reporters and editors who have lost their jobs in mainstream media. "Today, it is the niche, not the mainstream, media that [provide]blanket coverage of Congress and other important arms of the federal government," the Pew report concludes.

The collapse of print journalism - network newscasts are also in terrible shape - threatens to bifurcate the public square. Those who know the power of information will pay to obtain it, and use that knowledge to influence the agenda.

Those who lack the means or interest will depend on blogs, social networking and whatever information they choose to look for online. How does democracy survive on that?
brands  budget_cuts  commonwealth  decline  democracy  engaged_citizenry  influence  information_sources  Inside_the_Beltway  John_Ibbitson  local_journalism  magazines  mass_media  market_intelligence  newsletters  newspapers  niches  political_culture  politics  print_journalism  reputation  sophisticated  Washington_D.C. 
june 2009 by jerryking
It’s a small world after all - The Globe and Mail
Thursday, May. 28, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Craig
Silverman. future of news be online but a major part of that platform
will centre around a strategy called “hyper-local.” It works like this:
Rather than provide a diverse range of local, national and international
news, an online hyper-local site will focus solely on what matters to a
single (often small) community. This includes information about local
government, businesses and events.
newspapers  hyperlocal  future 
june 2009 by jerryking
A Future for Newspapers - WSJ.com
MAY 24, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | op-ed by ANDY KESSLER

Google, Microsoft and others dropped over $10 billion to buy online ad-delivery companies in the last few weeks alone.
Andy_Kessler  media  newspapers  op-ed  P2P  future  digital_media  business_models  monetization 
april 2009 by jerryking
Making Old Media New Again - WSJ.com
APRIL 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by L. GORDON CROVITZ

See Richard Tofel, "Restless Genius: Barney Kilgore, The Wall Street
Journal and the Invention of Modern Journalism."

The Journal changed. Technology increasingly meant readers would know
the basic facts of news as it happened. Kilgore crafted the front page
"What's News -- " column to summarize what had happened, but focused on
explaining what the news meant, outline the implications for the
economy, industry and commodity and financial markets.
5_W’s  books  creative_renewal  digital_media  financial_markets  implications  journalism  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  news  newspapers  print_journalism  WSJ 
april 2009 by jerryking
Can a Click Replace a Glance?
March 24, 2009 | The American Prospect | Paul Waldman

Newspapers offered a serendipitous reading experience that online
formats haven't managed to replicate. "The real value of the open-stack
library, on the other hand, is not the book you were looking for, but
the book you happened across on your way to what you were looking for.
It's what you see and realize you're interested in, or what you might
never have thought you'd be interested in."
newspapers  reading  experience  online  serendipity 
march 2009 by jerryking
Information Wants to Be Expensive - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 23, 2009 WSJ op-ed by L. GORDON CROVITZ arguing that newspapers need to act like they're worth something.


Time magazine published a cover story earlier this month headlined "How to Save Your Newspaper." In it, former Time Managing Editor Walter Isaacson noted how odd it is to charge for subscriptions in print but not online. "Even an old print junkie like me has quit subscribing to the New York Times, because if it doesn't see fit to charge me for its content, I'd feel like a fool paying for it. This is not a business model that makes sense."......People are happy to pay for news and information however it's delivered, but only if it has real, differentiated value. Traders must have their Bloomberg or Thomson Reuters terminal. Lawyers wouldn't go to court without accessing the Lexis or West online service..........By 2007, the Journal's Web site had reached one million paying subscribers who value full access and convenient navigation to its unique business news. Another 20 million people each month read Journal articles made available free. Likewise, the Financial Times and ESPN generate significant online revenues from subscribers, along with free content. So do consumer services such as Consumer Reports and Zagat. Steve Jobs proved we'll pay up to $1 for digital songs on iTunes, and Amazon's Kindle established $10 as reasonable for a digital book. .........For years, publishers and editors have asked the wrong question: Will people pay to access my newspaper content on the Web? The right question is: What kind of journalism can my staff produce that is different and valuable enough that people will pay for it online?..........newspaper journalists still report the key local news. American Lawyer founder Steven Brill argues that "local newspapers are the best brands, and people will pay a small amount to get information -- whether it be a zoning board or a Little League game -- that they can't get anywhere else." A few local newspapers, such as the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and Hong Kong's South China Morning Post, charge for access online, knowing their news can't be found elsewhere...........When author Stewart Brand coined the expression "Information wants to be free," he focused on how technology makes it cheap and easy to communicate and share knowledge. But the rest of his quote is rarely noticed.

This says, "Information also wants to be expensive." The right information in today's complex economy and society can make a huge difference in our professional and personal lives. Not having this information can also make a big difference, especially if someone else does have it. And for valuable information, online is a great new way for it to be valued.
asking_the_right_questions  Bloomberg  brands  differentiation  digital_media  information  iTunes  journalism  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Lexis  local_journalism  newspapers  op_ed  questions  Steve_Jobs  Steven_Brill  Stewart_Brand  subscriptions  Thomson_Reuters  TIME_Inc.  traders  Walter_Isaacson 
february 2009 by jerryking
After 50 years, Journal enters weekend fray
Monday, September 12, 2005 G&M article by SHAWN MCCARTHY.
Adopt to understand how to offer analysis and context. "The key to
success for The Wall Street Journal or any business publication is to
provide context and analysis, to explore trends in the financial world,
and to profile decision makers,""Our whole goal is to be a lighthouse as
opposed to a street light; to show people where things are going and
not where they are."
analysis  WSJ  Trends  newspapers  HeyMath  mathematics  contextual  Waudware  thought_leadership 
february 2009 by jerryking

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