recentpopularlog in

jerryking : newsstand_circulation   7

The 60-second interview: Adi Ignatius, editor in chief, Harvard Business Review- POLITICO Media
By CAPITAL STAFF 04/28/2015

H.B.R. represented an amazing challenge. Here was a 90-year-old publication that had always done well but that needed reinvention. And so we reimagined everything—the magazine, the website, the book division. Our goal was to find ways to connect with new fans, while maintaining the same high standards. By any yardstick, it worked! Our circulation, at 300,000, is the highest it’s ever been, and our newsstand sales soared. Our readers are deeply engaged, and I interact with them all the time......CAPITAL: Harvard Business Review stories do particularly well in terms of social shares on LinkedIn. What do you make of LinkedIn's ambitions to become a media company, with in-house editors looking over user-generated articles? How those ambitions impact your publication?

IGNATIUS: Yes, H.B.R. content does well across the major social channels, including LinkedIn. We respect LinkedIn and have watched it evolve more and more into a content player. But we’re excited about what we’re doing at H.B.R. and fully expect to remain a valued destination for people in business who love ideas. We’re in the process of reinvention again, redefining what it means to be a subscriber, to be part of the H.B.R. experience. It’s exciting, and we look forward to unveiling it before too long.
HBR  social_media  reinvention  reimagining  magazines  newsstand_circulation  LinkedIn 
april 2018 by jerryking
Time Inc. Decides Not to Sell Itself
APRIL 28, 2017 | The New York Times | By SYDNEY EMBER.

Time Inc. (home to Sports Illustrated, People and Time,) has decided to go it alone (e.g. remain independent and not sell itself), choosing a path filled with challenges that no legacy publisher has completely mastered.

Instead, the company said it would pursue the strategic plan its new management team had laid out, which includes increasing its digital audience and pursuing new opportunities for revenue growth......Print advertising and circulation revenues continue to fall, starving magazine companies of the lifeblood that long sustained them. Most publishers have shifted their focus to increasing non-print revenue, but new revenue sources have yet to make up the shortfall. To compensate, publishers continue to slash costs, transforming themselves into leaner companies with fewer employees and diminished resources.... As a publisher of magazines that highlighted stellar photography and weekly updates on news, sports and celebrities, Time Inc. was an empire that left an indelible mark on American culture.

But like many magazine publishers, Time Inc. has struggled to adapt to a digital age. The brutal economics of the publishing industry have made that challenge more daunting. In the last decade, Time Inc.’s revenue and operating profit have fallen sharply. Its work force has dropped from 11,000 to just over 7,000......[Time] has embarked on an aggressive strategy to increase Time Inc.’s digital revenue, including enhancing advertising technology abilities and offering customers paid services, such as a food-and-wine club. Last year, advertising revenue increased 3 percent, driven by substantial growth in digital advertising. Executives project that digital advertising revenue will increase to more than $600 million this year and $1 billion in the coming years.

But Time Inc.’s overall financial results have yet to improve, in large part because the company is still tied to its declining print business. About two-thirds of its annual revenue is still derived from magazines.

The company will report its first-quarter earnings on May 10.

Time Inc. is aiming to make $100 million in cost cuts this year, and Mr. Battista said the company would continue to be aggressive about cost management, particularly in its print business.
magazines  digital_media  ad-tech  CEOs  print_journalism  TIME_Inc.  cost-cutting  layoffs  newsstand_circulation  Meredith  structural_decline 
april 2017 by jerryking
Inside the D.C. bubble – stupid, slimy, savvy
Aug. 10 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski.

Mark Leibovich’s This Town betrays just about everything despicable about Washington’s political culture.

Politico’s business model lies not in pursuing high-minded Watergate-style journalism or even beating the Post in circulation or unique Web visitors. Fewer than 40,000 copies of its free print edition are distributed on the streets of Washington. Its content is aimed squarely at “The Club.”

In a new insider account of Washington, Mark Leibovich explains how The Club consists of the “spinning cabal of people in politics and media and the supporting sectors that never get voted out or term-limited or, God forbid, decide on their own that it is time to return home to the farm.”

The journalists, lobbyists, political consultants, White House aides, Capitol Hill staffers, socialites and persons-of-no-fixed-profession Mr. Leibovich profiles in This Town embody just about everything despicable about the D.C. bubble.....Playbook is the daily D.C. cheat sheet. Compiled by Politico’s Mike Allen, it summarizes the top news stories, parties, lobbying and book deals, staff changes, birthdays and nuptials of interest to The Club. And no one solicits mentions in Playbook – whose main corporate sponsor of late has been Keystone XL pipeline proponent TransCanada – as covetously as Robert Barnett.
Washington_D.C.  WaPo  Konrad_Yakabuski  sophisticated  start_ups  newspapers  business_models  politics  journalists  lobbyists  political_consultants  political_culture  books  Inside_the_Beltway  White_House  market_intelligence  newsstand_circulation  playbooks 
august 2013 by jerryking
Wondering How Far Magazines Must Fall
August 12, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Because of changes to the informational ecosystem, weeklies have been forced to leave behind the news and become magazines of ideas. Ms. Brown understood that; it’s just that some of her ideas weren’t always very good...The problem is not Tina Brown or her conceptual obsessions, or even the calcified formula of the weekly magazine.

The problem is more existential than that: magazines, all kinds of them, don’t work very well in the marketplace anymore.

Like newspapers, magazines have been in a steady slide, but now, like newspapers, they seem to have reached the edge of the cliff. Last week, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported that newsstand circulation in the first half of the year was down almost 10 percent. When 10 percent of your retail buyers depart over the course of a year, something fundamental is at work....It’s not just consumers who are playing hard to get: advertising is down 8.8 percent year to date over the same miserable period a year ago, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. With readership in such steep decline and advertising refusing to come back, magazines are in a downward spiral that not even their new digital initiatives can halt.
reinvention  magazines  David_Carr  future  digital_media  Tina_Brown  ideas  newsstand_circulation  advertising  downward_spirals  structural_change  print_journalism  seismic_shifts  newspapers  decline  digital_disruption 
august 2012 by jerryking
What's Next for Newsmagazines? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2008 | WSJ | By REBECCA DANA.
Fading Publications Try to Reinvent Themselves Yet Again

"Like any managers anywhere, we looked at a revenue picture that could be more thrilling and said, 'How can we accomplish two or three things?,' " Mr. Meacham said in an interview. " 'How can we control costs? How can we have money to rebuild and hire new voices and new reporting talent? And how can we do that in the service of what we've been trying to do with the magazine of the last year-and-a-half, which is make it more serious and try to make ourselves indispensable to the conversation?' "....."My whole view was there's more information out there than any time in human history. What people don't need more of is information," Mr. Stengel said. "They need a guide through the chaos."..."What's happened in the business as a whole is talk is cheap and reporting is expensive," said Newsweek writer Jonathan Alter, a 25-year veteran at the magazine who qualified for the buyout but declined it. But he adds, some of the change in culture is welcome. "In general, the office politics are at a much lower volume than in the past because the old fight of space is different than it was. If there's not room in the magazine for something, you can just do it online," he said.....At a recent speech at Columbia University, Mr. Meacham delivered a blistering response after he asked who reads Newsweek and none of the 100-odd students in attendance raised their hands.

"It's an incredible frustration that I've got some of the most decent, hard-working, honest, passionate, straight-shooting, non-ideological people who just want to tell the damn truth, and how to get this past this image that we're just middlebrow, you know, a magazine that your grandparents get, or something, that's the challenge," Mr. Meacham said. "And I just don't know how to do it, so if you've got any ideas, tell me."
chaos  commoditization_of_information  cost-controls  cost-cutting  curation  indispensable  information_overload  Jon_Meacham  journalists  journalism  magazines  multiple_targets  newsstand_circulation  office_politics  print_journalism  questions  reinvention  talent_acquisition  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
Fortune Magazine to Cut Number of Issues - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 23, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHIRA OVIDE.
Fortune is planning to publish about one-quarter fewer issues annually
and make other changes, joining the ranks of publications scrambling to
reinvent themselves in the advertising downturn.
Fortune  magazines  publishing  cost-cutting  economic_downturn  advertising  newsstand_circulation  reinvention 
october 2009 by jerryking
Worth Magazine to Reinvent Itself - NYTimes.com
May 17, 2009 | New York Times | By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD. Sandow
Media’s plan for Worth is to keep the personal finance coverage, with
stories on the pitfalls of philanthropy or interesting investment
vehicles, but to make it more luxe. For its circulation, Worth has
selected about 110,000 high-end recipients with a minimum of $2 million
in wealth, who live near other rich people and subscribe to financial
publications. They will get the publication free, while newsstand buyers
will have to pay $18.95 an issue.
Worth  magazines  makeovers  reinvention  high_net_worth  personal_finance  newsstand_circulation 
may 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read