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jerryking : nonfiction   17

Goldman Sachs | Careers Blog - 2017 Back-to-School Reading List
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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, by Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo
With three children under four coupled with a career in investment banking, I find it challenging to find time for reading books. But, I also struggle to find good books to read to my children, especially books for my daughters that aren’t about princesses and living happily ever after. I received “Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls” from a good friend who also has two daughters. Comprising a few hundred short stories depicting strong female leaders from recent history, the book provides great female role models for my daughters that aren’t princesses.
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The Three-Body Problem, by Liu Cixin
I’ve been a science fiction fan my entire life but had never read any Chinese works until this book. The plot is super-ambitious; since I don’t want to spoil anything I’ll just say it starts off with a wave of scientist suicides in the wake of experimental particle physics results that suggest science is broken.
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Network Thinking: Beyond Brockhaus Thinking, by Ulrich Weinberg
An unusual roadshow to the most innovative locations and people around the world. Where network thinking drives actions. The book leads behind the scenes of large corporations that are leaving the analog 20th century “Brockhaus Thinking” mode, but also to small companies that never practiced it. It shows how a network thinking approach can make corporates and individuals extremely successful.
books  booklists  book_reviews  Edith_Cooper  fiction  Goldman_Sachs  nonfiction  science_fiction 
march 2019 by jerryking
21 Lessons for the 21st Century,
The world in 2050. In an excerpt from his new book, “21 Lessons for the 21st Century,” Yuval Noah Harai examines nothing less than the impact of artificial intelligence on our political and econom...
books  nonfiction  artificial_intelligence 
august 2018 by jerryking
Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau
April 8, 2018 | Financial Times | Kadhim Shubber 10 HOURS AG

Review of [Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau, Yale University Press, $25]

....so Landau’s latest work leaves the reader wishing for a deeper reckoning with these complex issues.

Landau is a respected expert in cryptography and computer security, with a long career both studying and working in the field. She was an engineer at Sun Microsystems for over a decade and is currently a professor in cyber security at Tufts University. Her clean, knowledgeable writing reflects the depth of her expertise — with just a trace of jargon at times — as she traces the tug of war that has played out between law enforcement and cryptographers in recent decades.....Landau persuasively argues that the increasingly digital and interconnected society and economy we inhabit creates vulnerabilities that we ignore at our peril.......Landau is an advocate for strong computer security, and uses this book to reject calls for “back doors” that would allow law enforcement access to encrypted hardware, like iPhones, or messaging apps, such as WhatsApp. But she also encourages governments to become better at proactive “front door” hacking. In the process, she warns, they should not rush to disclose security weaknesses they discover, which inevitably leaves them open for others to exploit......Yet we have seen that the government’s toolbox can also fall into the wrong hands. In 2016 and 2017, a powerful set of hacking tools built by the NSA were leaked by hackers.
Apple  back_doors  books  book_reviews  cryptography  cyber_security  FBI  hacking  nonfiction  Stuxnet  Tim_Cook  vulnerabilities 
april 2018 by jerryking
Windfall, by Meghan O’Sullivan
Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America’s Power, by Meghan L O’Sullivan, Simon and Schuster $29.00

the shale revolution has meant the US has become a leading global oil producer and net exporter of natural gas. Extraction from shale rock has upended global oil and gas markets, but could also have geopolitical ramifications. For most of the 20th century, western powers were locked in a scramble for oil across the globe. So what happens when technology unlocks substantial supply on home turf?

According to Meghan O’Sullivan, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, the answer is a geopolitical shift that should benefit the US. She provides a powerful argument for how America should capitalize on the “New Energy Abundance”. Having a domestic supply of oil and gas not only strengthens the US economy, it can also provide leverage globally......US gas has transferred low prices to Europe and also offers an alternative source of supply. That “has helped make Europe less vulnerable to one of Russia’s longstanding foreign policy tools — the political manipulation of natural gas markets”, O’Sullivan writes......the book details the benefits to US “hard” as well as “soft” power,....It will not lead to reduced US involvement in the Middle East, .....Nor can the US ever be self-sufficient to provide all the oil it needs,.....The book points out that energy is likely to be a major future determinant of geopolitics....China’s One Belt One Road project shows Xi Jinping’s intent to change the strategic orientation of the Eurasian landmass......a challenge to O’Sullivan’s thesis is that renewables and electric vehicles could drive seismic shifts. If China becomes the Saudi Arabia of batteries, will this give it greater influence? What about those who control the raw materials needed, from lithium to cobalt? O’Sullivan hints at this in her introduction, saying we should expect renewables “eventually to have major repercussions for global politics”. These could include cartels around lithium or the state collapse of some oil producers.
nonfiction  books  fracking  energy  natural_gas  soft_power  policy_tools  shale_oil  hydraulic_fracturing  pipelines  oil_industry  geopolitics  renewable  electric_cars  batteries  One_Belt_One_Road  Xi_Jinping 
december 2017 by jerryking
Spies Like Us: A Conversation With John le Carré and Ben Macintyre
AUG. 25, 2017 | The New York Times |By SARAH LYALL.

Conversations between John le Carré and Ben Macintyre
fiction  espionage  security_&_intelligence  novels  John_le_Carré  nonfiction 
august 2017 by jerryking
3 Books That Help Make Sense of Cyberwar
MAY 24, 2017 | The New York Times | By CONCEPCIÓN DE LEÓN.

DARK TERRITORY (2016)
The Secret History of Cyber War
By Fred Kaplan

CYBER WAR (2010)
The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It
By Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake
290 pp.
338 pp.

NEUROMANCER (1984)
By William Gibson
304 pp.
cyber_warfare  fiction  books  nonfiction  Fred_Kaplan  security_&_intelligence  William_Gibson  Richard_Clarke  hackers 
may 2017 by jerryking
An Insider-Trading Tale That Reads Like a Thriller - The New York Times
By ANDREW ROSS SORKINFEB. 7, 2017

“Black Edge: Inside Information, Dirty Money, and the Quest to Bring Down the Most Wanted Man on Wall Street,”
nonfiction  hedge_funds  Andrew_Sorkin  books  slight_edge  insider_trading  informational_advantages  Wall_Street  Preet_Bharara  SAC_Capital  Steven_Cohen  book_reviews  white-collar_crime  Sheelah_Kolhatkar 
february 2017 by jerryking
From Michael Lewis, a Portrait of the Men Who Shaped ‘Moneyball’ - The New York Times
By ALEXANDRA ALTERDEC. 3, 2016
Lewis decided to explore how it started.

The inquiry led him to the work of two Israeli psychologists, Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, whose discoveries challenged long-held beliefs about human nature and the way the mind works.

Mr. Lewis chronicles their unusual partnership in his new book, “The Undoing Project,” a story about two unconventional thinkers who saw the world differently from everyone around them. Their peculiar area of research — how humans make decisions, often irrationally — has had profound implications for an array of fields, like professional sports, the military, medicine, politics, finance and public health.....Tversky and Kahneman's research demonstrating how people behave in fundamentally irrational ways when making decisions, relying on their gut rather than available data, gave rise to the field of behavioral economics. That discipline attracted Paul DePodesta, a Harvard student, who later went into sports management and helped upend professional baseball when he went to work for Mr. Beane.....Unlike many nonfiction writers, Mr. Lewis declines to take advances, which he calls “corrupting,” even though he could easily earn seven figures. Instead, he splits the profits from the books, as well as the advertising and production costs, with Norton. The setup spurs him to work harder and to make more money if the books are successful, he says.

“You should have the risk and you should enjoy the reward,” he said. “It’s not healthy for an author not to have the risk.”
Amos_Tversky  Michael_Lewis  Moneyball  books  book_reviews  unconventional_thinking  biases  cognitive_skills  unknowns  information_gaps  humility  pretense_of_knowledge  overconfidence  conventional_wisdom  overestimation  metacognition  behavioural_economics  irrationality  decision_making  nonfiction  writers  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  Daniel_Kahneman  psychologists  delusions  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game  gut_feelings  risk-taking  partnerships 
december 2016 by jerryking
A field guide to lies : critical thinking in the information age : Levitin, Daniel J., author. : Book, Regular Print Book : Toronto Public Library
Year/Format: 2016, Book , 304 pages

It's becoming harder to separate the wheat from the digital chaff. How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, distortions and outright lies from reliable information? In A Field Guide to Lies, neuroscientist Daniel Levitin outlines the many pitfalls of the information age and provides the means to spot and avoid them. Levitin groups his field guide into two categories--statistical infomation and faulty arguments--ultimately showing how science is the bedrock of critical thinking. It is easy to lie with stats and graphs as few people "take the time to look under the hood and see how they work." And, just because there's a number on something, doesn't mean that the number was arrived at properly. Logic can help to evaluate whether or not a chain of reasoning is valid. And "infoliteracy" teaches us that not all sources of information are equal, and that biases can distort data. Faced with a world too eager to flood us with information, the best response is to be prepared. A Field Guide to Lies helps us avoid learning a lot of things that aren't true.
books  nonfiction  critical_thinking  infoliteracy  biases  lying  information_overload  TPL  Daniel_Levitin  engaged_citizenry  signals  noise  information_sources 
september 2016 by jerryking
Stories of espionage: Spies like her
Aug 25th 2012 | The Economist

The Spy Who Loved: The Secrets and Lives of Christine Granville. By Clare Mulley. Macmillan; 426 pages; £18.99. To be published in America by St Martin’s Press. Buy from Amazon.co.uk
espionage  WWII  book_reviews  books  security_&_intelligence  biographies  nonfiction 
august 2012 by jerryking

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