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jerryking : nontraditional   3

The Free-Form Funeral - WSJ
By Clare Ansberry
March 2, 2019 11:00 a.m. ET

There are new ways to say goodbye.

While many still turn to the funeral rites that have comforted generations, others, led by baby boomers, are taking a different approach than their parents and grandparents. They are instead choosing individualized and symbolic memorials: a party with a punk-rock band for a tattoo artist, or a gathering at an airport hangar for the devoted mechanic.

“It’s more about a life lived than a ritual of religion,” says Jimmy Olson, a spokesperson for the National Funeral Directors Association.

A changing society is fueling this trend. Nearly a quarter of adults in the U.S. aren’t affiliated with any organized religion, according to a 2014 report from the Pew Research Center. A rise in cremations, which now outnumber burials, gives leeway on when and where to hold memorials. Although there are some laws about where ashes can be scattered, many people spread them surreptitiously in especially meaningful places. In the past year, more than half of around 1,000 people surveyed had attended a memorial in a non-traditional place—in a backyard, atop a mountain, aboard a boat—according to the NFDA.
farewells  free-form  funerals  memorials  nontraditional  symbolism 
march 2019 by jerryking
Getting Started in ‘Big Data’ - The CFO Report - WSJ
February 4, 2014 | WSJ |by JAMES WILLHITE.

executives and recruiters, who compete for talent in the nascent specialty, point to hiring strategies that can get a big-data operation off the ground. They say they look for specific industry experience, poach from data-rich rivals, rely on interview questions that screen out weaker candidates and recommend starting with small projects.

David Ginsberg, chief data scientist at business-software maker SAP AG , said communication skills are critically important in the field, and that a key player on his big-data team is a “guy who can translate Ph.D. to English. Those are the hardest people to find.”

Along with the ability to explain their findings, data scientists need to have a proven record of being able to pluck useful information from data that often lack an obvious structure and may even come from a dubious source. This expertise doesn’t always cut across industry lines. A scientist with a keen knowledge of the entertainment industry, for example, won’t necessarily be able to transfer his skills to the fast-food market.

Some candidates can make the leap. Wolters Kluwer NV, a Netherlands-based information-services provider, has had some success in filling big-data jobs by recruiting from other, data-rich industries, such as financial services. “We have found tremendous success with going to alternative sources and looking at different businesses and saying, ‘What can you bring into our business?’ ” said Kevin Entricken, the company’s chief financial officer.
massive_data_sets  analytics  data_scientists  cross-industry  recruiting  howto  poaching  plain_English  connecting_the_dots  storytelling  SAP  Wolters_Kluwer  expertise  Communicating_&_Connecting  unstructured_data  war_for_talent  talent  PhDs  executive_search  artificial_intelligence  nontraditional 
june 2014 by jerryking
Stephen Byrd | Developing a Multiracial 'Desire' | Cultural Conversation by Joanne Kaufman - WSJ.com
April 26, 2012 | WSJ | By JOANNE KAUFMAN.

Former investment banker Stephen Byrd, 55, is one of the very few African-American producers on Broadway, and the first (with Alia Jones) to win London's Olivier Award, isn't interested in business as usual....The producer learning curve is steep enough. But Mr. Byrd has set himself an added challenge: attracting nontraditional audiences.
African-Americans  Broadway  theatre  playwrights  nontraditional  angels  risk-management  producers  learning_curves 
may 2012 by jerryking

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