recentpopularlog in

jerryking : nostalgia   72

Woman in Love - YouTube
Radio Demerara and GBS while growing up. Attending St. Margaret's and BHS.
'70s  nostalgia  music  songs 
june 2019 by jerryking
The Arts in the 90s –
May 28, 2008 | Stabroek News | By Barrington Braithwaite.
'90s  art  art_galleries  artists  creative_class  culture  dance  drama  Guyana  Guyanese  history  nostalgia  playwrights 
may 2019 by jerryking
How the nineties are coming back to haunt us - The Globe and Mail
March 10, 2019 The Globe and Mail | CHRIS FREY, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Don’t call it a comeback, it’s been here for years: Our nostalgia for the 1990s obscures the story of how the decade created the crises of the present.....the nineties....is...a decade we have a hard time remembering right.....No matter how well or harshly you judge the decade’s music, films, fads or fashions, this recycling is largely to be expected, given nostalgia’s tendency to follow something like a 20-year cycle......Pundits may wax on about how unprecedented our current political times might seem, but they’re not without their moments of woozy déjà vu – signal events and moments of the nineties recast and remade.....So much of that decade’s politics – decisions made, issues unaddressed – haunt our current times more than any other. From societal issues of race and gender to the global economics of trade, from the radical transformations of the internet to the corrosive effects of growing political polarization, so many of the destabilizing forces that mark this current period in the United States and much of the West were either incubated, unleashed or amplified during that time. .........The ultimate revenge of the nineties is probably that the man now occupying the highest office of the United States was, through much of that decade, its most notoriously failed businessman – bankrupt and abandoned by his lenders, his name reduced to a punch line on late-night talk shows.......Which is entirely the point. In the introduction to his 2008 essay collection Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, the historian Tony Judt argued that, in time, we would come to regard the period between the fall of communism (1989-1991) and the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003 as “the years the locusts ate: a decade and a half of wasted opportunity and political incompetence on both sides of the Atlantic.”

Quite suddenly, Mr. Judt argued, we fell under the notion that history could have little to teach us, except in the most narrow triumphalist sense. “With too much confidence and too little reflection we put the 20th century behind us and strode boldly into its successor swaddled in self-serving half-truths: the triumph of the West, the end of History, the unipolar American moment, the ineluctable march of globalization and the free market.”........Republican House speaker Newt Gingrich, who, with his populist-tinged “Contract with America,” led the GOP in 1994 to seize control of the House for the first time in 40 years......had the more lasting impact on the tenor and style of U.S. politics.....in the cover letter to a memo from 1990, entitled Language: A Key Mechanism of Control, he endorsed a call for his Republican colleagues to brand their Democrat rivals as “traitors”, “pathetic”, “corrupt”, “radical” and, of course, “socialist.”........The decision by the FCC, in 1987, to stop enforcing the Fairness Doctrine.... had unleashed a boom in conservative talk radio. By 1991, Rush Limbaugh was already the most syndicated radio host in the United States.......One of the quainter predictions made in the nineties, no doubt influenced by the post-Cold War mood, when the West thought it had triumphed over authoritarianism, was that the internet would inevitably lead to more political freedom around the world.
'90s  demagoguery  foreshadowing  fractured_internally  gridlocked_politics  Newt_Gingrich  nostalgia  partisan_politics  political_polarization  popular_culture  reboot  revivals 
march 2019 by jerryking
Daryl Dragon, of the Captain and Tennille Pop Duo, Dies at 76 - The New York Times
By Neil Genzlinger
Jan. 2, 2019

*Love Will Keep Us Together.
* You Never Done It Like That
* Do That to Me One More Time
'70s  music  nostalgia  obituaries  singers  duos  pop 
january 2019 by jerryking
The perilous path up Congo’s Mt Stanley
OCTOBER 13, 2017 | FT | Martin Fletcher.

the southern section of Virunga, Africa’s oldest national park, reopened after two decades of near-constant conflict in 2014. Happily that section contained two of Virunga’s great glories — its 300-odd mountain gorillas, nearly a third of all those left in the world, and the Nyiragongo volcano, in whose crater the world’s largest lava lake bubbles and spurts like some malign, sinister being.

But I heard stories while there of Virunga’s third glory — the mysterious, snow-capped Rwenzori Mountains at its northern end, the original “Mountains of the Moon” Ptolemy identified as the source of the Nile some 1,800 years ago.
************************************************************
In a 1964 children's book by Willard Price called Elephant Adventure, the story takes place in the Mountains of the Moon, where the wildlife, including the elephants, the trees and other vegetation are supposed to be of sizes at least one third larger than in the rest of Africa. Price cites a March 1962 article in National Geographic Magazine as the basis for his premise.
Uganda  Africa  travel  nostalgia  Congo  mountaineering 
january 2018 by jerryking
Guaranteed to Raise a Smile
May 19, 2017 | WSJ | By Dominic Green

Pop music, psychedelia and nostalgia fused together in the album that defined the 1960s.

Universal Music Group, which owns Capitol Records, is marking the anniversary by issuing a multi-disc box set. There is also a box-full of books intended to reintroduce to us the act we’ve known for all these years. Brian Southall, a pop journalist when the band was together, handled publicity for EMI in the 1970s. Mike McInnerney designed the sleeve of the Who’s “Tommy.” Lavishly illustrated, their books reflect the synthesis between pop entertainment and thoughtful art that the Beatles were after......The 1960s formed the Beatles. The Beatles, with a little help from their friend, producer George Martin, made “Sgt. Pepper.” Now “Sgt. Pepper” defines the ’60s............“Pepper” endures not just because it caught the mood of the Summer of Love, or because it married pop music to the modernist techniques of the collage and the tape loop, or because it sounds quaintly futuristic. “Pepper” endures because it entered the past so quickly. On June 25, 1967, little more than three weeks after the album’s release, the Beatles joined Maria Callas and Picasso in the first live international satellite broadcast, for which they performed a new song, “All You Need Is Love.” The event initiated our age of simultaneous global media and announced the triumph of television. Like its Edwardian costumes and parping brass, “Pepper” was a colorized document from history—from a past in which music, not the visual image, could still change the world.
Beatles  '60s  anniversaries  music  iconic  cultural_touchpoints  pop_music  psychedelic  nostalgia  art  1967  kaleidoscopic 
may 2017 by jerryking
In 1967, the birth of modern Canada - The Globe and Mail
JAN. 02, 2017 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | DOUG SAUNDERS |

1967 is the hinge upon which modern Canadian history turns and, in certain respects, the key to understanding the challenges of the next half-century.

Today, we live in the country shaped by the decisions and transformations of 1967, far more than by the events of 1867.

Let me make the case, then, that 1967 was Canada’s first good year. We should spend this year celebrating not the 150 th year of Confederation, but the 50th birthday of the new Canada.

But let me also make the case that our conventional story about the birth of second-century Canada is largely wrong. We like to believe that starting in the late 1960s, a series of political decisions, parliamentary votes, court rulings and royal commissions descended upon an innocent, paternalistic, resource-economy Canada and forced upon it an awkward jumble of novelties: non-white immigration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, refugees, indigenous nationhood, liberation of women and gays, the seeds of free trade, individual rights, religious diversity.

But the explosions of official novelty that were launched in and around 1967 weren’t a cause; they were an effect of profound changes that had taken place in Canadians themselves during the two decades after the war, in their thinking and their composition and their attitude toward their country, in Quebec and English Canada and in indigenous communities.


There is a solid line leading from the events of 1967 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982: It was impossible to have a Canada of multiple peoples, as we discovered was necessary in the late 1960s, without having a Canada of individual people and their rights.

....Individual rights, Quebecois consciousness, indigenous shared-sovereignty status and cultural plurality weren’t the only inevitable outcomes of the 1967 moment. What Canada witnessed over the next two decades was a self-reinforcing spiral of events that often sprung directly from the centennial-era awakening of a postcolonial consciousness.
Doug_Saunders  anniversaries  1967  nostalgia  nationalism  '60s  turning_points  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Canada  Canada150  national_identity  aboriginals  postcolonial  symbolism  John_Diefenbaker  Lester_Pearson  multiculturalism  Quebecois  Quiet_Revolution  monoculturalism  land_claim_settlements  immigration  royal_commissions  sesquicentennial  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms  Confederation  retrospectives 
january 2017 by jerryking
Ron Glass, Who Played a Dapper Detective on ‘Barney Miller,’ Dies at 71 - The New York Times
By CHRISTOPHER MELENOV. 27, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
obituaries  African-Americans  actors  '70s  '80s  nostalgia  NYPD 
november 2016 by jerryking
My Guyana: 50 years ago : Kaieteur News
MAY 8, 2016 | BY KNEWS | FILED UNDER FEATURES / COLUMNISTS, MY COLUMN 
guyana  history  anniversaries  nostalgia 
may 2016 by jerryking
Black Kudos • Claude Brown Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 -...
Claude Brown

Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, published to critical acclaim in 1965, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. He also published Children of Ham (1976).
writers  nostalgia  African-Americans  Harlem  New_York_City  '50s  lawyers  '40s  coming-of-age 
october 2015 by jerryking
Bill Cosby Movies
Bill Cosby co-starred with Sidney Poitier in many successful films (Uptown Saturday Night, Let's Do It Again, A Piece of the Action)
Bill_Cosby  '70s  movies  funnies  films  nostalgia  Sidney_Poitier 
september 2014 by jerryking
No Cheap Trick: Why the time is always right for nostalgia rock - The Globe and Mail
BRAD WHEELER
Globe and Mail update – with correction
Published Tuesday, Jun. 24 2014,
Brad_wheeler  nostalgia  music 
august 2014 by jerryking
A Rancher’s Romantic Revisionism - NYTimes.com
APRIL 25, 2014
Continue reading the main story

Charles M. Blow
slavery  revisionism  history  bigotry  nostalgia 
april 2014 by jerryking
Why newness, not nostalgia, is the way forward for the CBC - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 03 2013 |The Globe and Mail | JOHN DOYLE.

Pardon me if I seem like a CBC bore, but the future cannot be found in nostalgia for a fondly remembered past or in endless collaboration with the enemy. The future is niche and broad, both the new and the familiar....It’s unwise to posit a recalibrated CBC on the antiquities of the past. Nostalgia for The Journal, Barbara Frum, and Patrick Watson’s series is understandable, but there is no going back to the good old days. The TV landscape has changed utterly. Nostalgia is not the way forward....Lacroix’s reliance on partnerships is a red herring. Of course it makes sense to use partnerships with other broadcasters to deliver big sporting events. But to cite “collaboration” with giant private-broadcasting conglomerates as a general panacea is a mistake. CBC-TV’s future is being both niche and broad – and distinctive; its mandate must not be diminished by “collaboration.”...[CBC's]news and documentary coverage must be different. That means more progressive voices heard, filling a huge gap in the Canadian media, an arena dominated by centre and right-wing views. The politically-progressive base in Canada remains stable and remains largely unheard. It’s the CBC’s job to fill that vacuum. Less of the Don Cherry-style dismissal of “pinkos out there that ride bicycles” and more attention to those who reject the right-wing, Big Business view of the country....CBC needs to put art on the air and cover the arts and media with a vigour that no commercial broadcaster will allow....Instead, a sharp questioning of establishment views and establishment stars. Something to make people talk about – whether it’s the demolition of received opinion or the creation of an artistic work for TV that makes your eyes pop and your mind reel.

It’s a fact that CBC is presented with a new circumstance, less reliant on, and preoccupied with, hockey.
CBC  CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  Konrad_Yakabuski  niches  nostalgia  partnerships  digital_media  future 
december 2013 by jerryking
Modern Method French Course Book 5
Discarded during the move. Belonged to Aunt Irma
books  nostalgia  French 
august 2013 by jerryking
Dairies Profit From Home Delivery Resurgence - WSJ.com
May 15, 2007 | WSJ | Gwendolyn Bounds.

As American consumers rush toward healthier, home-grown foods, the old-fashioned trade of home milk delivery is making a comeback in pockets around the country. And that appetite for wholesome fare, coupled with rising gas prices, is giving an unexpected marketing boost to some tiny dairies and local milk distributors, helping them compete against larger rivals who saturate store shelves....For its part, Crescent Ridge, believing its core business was strong, took advantage of the difficulties by purchasing the trucks, customer lists and assets of other small struggling dairies.

Today, the small business has about $7 million in annual sales, serves 6,000 home-delivery customers and is profitable. Its milkmen are paid $40,000 to $50,000 a year, have 401(k)s and health benefits. What's more, the milkmen and glass bottles are now a core marketing asset -- a nostalgic chit that distinguishes Crescent Ridge products from competitors'.
dairy  small_business  Gwendolyn_Bounds  home-delivery  milkmen  glass_bottles  last_mile  nostalgia 
january 2013 by jerryking
(1) A Piece of the Action
A Piece of the Action
Uptown Saturday Night
Let's Do it Again
nostalgia  Bill_Cosby  movies  films  blaxploitation 
october 2012 by jerryking
The Last Good Year
September 29, 1997 | Maclean's | Pierre Berton

https://archive.macleans.ca/article/1997/9/29/the-last-good-year

It was a golden year, and so it seems in retrospect—a year in which we let off steam like schoolboys whooping and hollering at term’s end. We all thought big that year. The symbolic birthday cake on Parliament Hill stood 30 feet high: ice cream and cake for 30,000 kids and hang the expense! Over and over again, we showed the world what Canadians could do: Nancy Greene grabbing the World Cup for skiing; Elaine Tanner, the aquatic Mighty Mouse, taking four medals at the Pan-American Games; Marshall McLuhan on every magazine cover.

By a number of measurements, we are a great deal better off today than we were 30 years ago. We are healthier and we are wealthier than we were in 1967. The real net worth of the average Canadian is almost double what it was back then. Babies born today can expect to live longer—six years more than the centennial crop of babies.

Why, then, do we look back to 1967 as a golden year compared with 1997? If we are better off today, why all the hand-wringing? There are several reasons, but the big one, certainly, is the very real fear that the country we celebrated so joyously 30 years ago is in the process of falling apart. In that sense, 1967 was the last good year before all Canadians began to be concerned about the future of our country.
1967  nostalgia  anniversaries  nationalism  '60s  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Expo_67  retrospectives  annus_mirabilis  turning_points 
august 2012 by jerryking
Jazz-rock ambassadors Steely Dan bring shuffle diplomacy to Toronto - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
TORONTO — From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 24, 2011 3:53PM EDT
Last updated Monday, Jul. 25,
musical_performances  Toronto  jazz-rock  Steely_Dan  nostalgia 
july 2011 by jerryking
Mountains of the Moon (Africa) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In a book by Willard Price called "Elephant Adventure", the
story takes place in the Mountains of the Moon, where the wildlife
including the elephants, the trees and other vegetation is supposed to be of sizes at least one third larger than in the rest of Africa. Price cites a March 1962 article in National Geographic Magazine as the basis for his information.
wikipedia  novels  reminiscing  nostalgia  Uganda 
october 2010 by jerryking
Hall & Oates Finds New Fans With Old Mustache - WSJ.com
MARCH 12, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | b y JOHN JURGENSEN. Marketing a Famous Mustache
John Oates's facial hair makes a comeback of its own
music  music_industry  nostalgia  '80s 
march 2010 by jerryking
The rise and fall of Guyana’s cinemas
July 26, 2009 | Stabroek News | Godfrey Chin. "Anyone who has
read Godfrey Chin’s beautiful book “Nostalgias” will tell you he/she
feels blessed afterwards. In literary terms it is not a masterpiece, but
it certainly serves the purpose of preserving an existential past that
could fade into nothingness. All young Guyanese ought to read what
Godfrey Chin writes."
Guyana  nostalgia  History  cinemas  movies  reminiscing  Guyanese 
july 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read