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jerryking : obesity   7

Make 2020 the Year of Less Sugar
Dec. 30, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tara Parker-Pope.

Added sugar lurks in nearly 70 percent of packaged foods and is found in breads, health foods, snacks, yogurts, most breakfast foods and sauces. The average American eats about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day (not counting the sugars that occur naturally in foods like fruit or dairy products). That’s about double the recommended limit for men (nine teaspoons) and triple the limit for women (six teaspoons).........the benefit of reducing the sugar in your diet. “It’s not about being obese, it has to do with metabolic health,” .......“Sugar turns on the aging programs in your body,” ...... “The more sugar you eat, the faster you age.”.....the case against sugar is as strong as the case against smoking or excess alcohol. ......eating high amounts of added sugar doubles the risk of heart disease, even for people who aren’t overweight. Added sugar has also been implicated in an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes, cancer, stroke and even Alzheimer’s disease.

And too much added sugar in your diet can damage your liver, similarly to the way that alcohol can. About a third of American adults and 13 percent of children have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition linked to added sugar consumption that is on the rise and that can progress to serious, even deadly, liver illness..... when the liver repeatedly detects more fructose, a form of sugar found in fruits that is also added to many processed foods, than our bodies can use. To deal with it, the liver breaks down the extra fructose and changes it to fat globules, which are then exported into the bloodstream and deposited around your internal organs and your midsection.

Fruit vs. Fructose
it’s O.K. to eat fruit! Your body can handle fructose when it’s eaten as whole fruit!!!.....for many people, getting control of their sugar habit is the most important thing they can do for their health. If they can’t do it through abstinence, then mostly-abstinence is a good thing to achieve.”
abstinence  diets  healthy_lifestyles  mens'_health  metabolism  nutrition  obesity  resolutions  sugar  Tara_Parker-Pope 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
The Decline of ‘Big Soda’ - The New York Times
OCT. 2, 2015 | NYT | Margot Sanger-Katz.

The obvious lesson from Philadelphia is that the soda industry is winning the policy battles over the future of its product. But the bigger picture is that soda companies are losing the war.

By the end of this decade, if not sooner, sales of bottled water are expected to surpass those of carbonated soft drinks.
Even as anti-obesity campaigners like Mr. Nutter have failed to pass taxes, they have accomplished something larger. In the course of the fight, they have reminded people that soda is not a very healthy product. They have echoed similar messages coming from public health researchers and others — and fundamentally changed the way Americans think about soda.

Over the last 20 years, sales of full-calorie soda in the United States have plummeted by more than 25 percent. Soda consumption, which rocketed from the 1960s through 1990s, is now experiencing a serious and sustained decline.
calories  beverages  sugar  diets  water  eating_habits  Coca-Cola  Pepsi  obesity  decline 
october 2015 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Reading, writing ... and reps
June 26, 2007 G&M article by Siri Agrell on how toy
companies and fitness chains are cashing in on concerns over childhood
obesity with tot-friendly exercise equipment.
exercise  fitness  business_development  children  weight_loss  obesity 
january 2009 by jerryking

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