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jerryking : oligarchs   4

Houston Estates, Carl Greeenidge’s book and the African Guyanese tragedy – Kaieteur News
** “Empowering a Peasantry in a Caribbean Context: The Case of Land Settlement Schemes in Guyana, 1865-1985 by Carl Greenidge”.

This book argues a case whereby freed slaves who worked the lands of Guyana and made Guyana viable were terribly and deliberately discriminated against in their quest to build a landed economy for themselves......Looking back at the ownership of land by many rich families and situating land ownership in the historical context of what Adamson and Greenidge wrote, you see the glaring historical wrongs done to African Guyanese.
African_Guyanese_villages  Afro-Guyanese  books  Freddie_Kissoon  generational_wealth  history  land_ownership  oligarchs  slavery  sugar 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
Why the US economy isn’t as competitive or free as you think
November 14, 2019 | Financial Times | by Martin Wolf.

The Great Reversal: How America Gave up on Free Markets, by Thomas Philippon, Belknap Press RRP$29.95, 368 pages

It began with a simple question: “Why on earth are US cell phone plans so expensive?” In pursuit of the answer, Thomas Philippon embarked on a detailed empirical analysis of how business actually operates in today’s America and finished up by overturning much of what almost everybody takes as read about the world’s biggest economy.

Over the past two decades, competition and competition policy have atrophied, with dire consequences......America is no longer the home of the free-market economy, competition is not more fierce there than in Europe, its regulators are not more proactive and its new crop of superstar companies not radically different from their predecessors.

Philippon's argument:
(1) US markets have become less competitive: concentration is high in many industries, leaders are entrenched, and their profit rates are excessive.
(2) this lack of competition has hurt US consumers and workers: it has led to higher prices, lower investment and lower productivity growth.
(3) contrary to common wisdom, the main explanation is political, not technological: Philippon traces the decrease in competition to increasing barriers to entry and weak antitrust enforcement, sustained by heavy lobbying and campaign contributions.”....... the US economy has seen a significant reduction in competition and a corresponding rise in monopoly and oligopoly.

What should the US want? The answers, suggests Philippon, are: free entry; regulators prepared to make mistakes when acting against monopoly; and protection of transparency, privacy and data ownership by customers. The great obstacle to action in the US is the pervasive role of money in politics. The results are the twin evils of oligopoly and oligarchy. Donald Trump is in so many ways a product of the defective capitalism described in The Great Reversal. What the US needs, instead, is another Teddy Roosevelt and his energetic trust-busting. Is that still imaginable? All believers in the virtues of competitive capitalism must hope so.
antitrust  barriers_to_entry  books  book_reviews  campaign_contributions  Citizens_United  competitiveness_of_nations  crony_capitalism  dark_money  economics  economists  entrenched_interests  EU  FAANG  free_markets  French  gun_laws  healthcare  lobbying  market_concentration  monopolies  monopsony  oligopolies  oligarchs  regulators  Theodore_Roosevelt  uncompetitive 
november 2019 by jerryking
Freed Russian oligarch leaves a wrecked country behind
Dec. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | CARL MORTISHED.
Freed Russian oligarch leaves a wrecked country behind Add to ...
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Published Friday,
oligarchs  Russian  Mikhail_Khodorkovsky  exile 
december 2013 by jerryking
The Self-Destruction of the 1 Percent -
October 13, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By CHRYSTIA FREELAND.

IN the early 14th century, Venice was one of the richest cities in Europe. At the heart of its economy was the colleganza, a basic form of joint-stock company created to finance a single trade expedition. The brilliance of the colleganza was that it opened the economy to new entrants, allowing risk-taking entrepreneurs to share in the financial upside with the established businessmen who financed their merchant voyages.

Venice’s elites were the chief beneficiaries. Like all open economies, theirs was turbulent. Today, we think of social mobility as a good thing. But if you are on top, mobility also means competition. In 1315, when the Venetian city-state was at the height of its economic powers, the upper class acted to lock in its privileges, putting a formal stop to social mobility with the publication of the Libro d’Oro, or Book of Gold, an official register of the nobility. If you weren’t on it, you couldn’t join the ruling oligarchy.

The political shift, which had begun nearly two decades earlier, was so striking a change that the Venetians gave it a name: La Serrata, or the closure. It wasn’t long before the political Serrata became an economic one, too. Under the control of the oligarchs, Venice gradually cut off commercial opportunities for new entrants. Eventually, the colleganza was banned. The reigning elites were acting in their immediate self-interest, but in the longer term, La Serrata was the beginning of the end for them, and for Venetian prosperity more generally. By 1500, Venice’s population was smaller than it had been in 1330. In the 17th and 18th centuries, as the rest of Europe grew, the city continued to shrink....several recent studies have shown that in America today it is harder to escape the social class of your birth than it is in Europe. The Canadian economist Miles Corak has found that as income inequality increases, social mobility falls...Businessmen like to style themselves as the defenders of the free market economy, but as Luigi Zingales, an economist at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, argued, “Most lobbying is pro-business, in the sense that it promotes the interests of existing businesses, not pro-market in the sense of fostering truly free and open competition.”
business_interests  capitalism  Chrystia_Freeland  city-states  cronyism  crony_capitalism  depopulation  elitism  entrenched_interests  history  income_distribution  income_inequality  lobbying  locked_in  moguls  new_entrants  oligarchs  pro-business  pro-market  Renaissance  self-destructive  self-interest  social_classes  social_mobility  The_One_Percent  Venice  winner-take-all 
september 2013 by jerryking

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