recentpopularlog in

jerryking : operational_tempo   14

Get Ready to Defend the Free Market
06.02.97 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard

LET'S CLONE GEORGE GILDER. One is just not enough. The original I'd keep in his current job as a technology writer and forecaster of the first rank. Nobody rea...
Rich_Karlgaard  free_markets  George_Soros  warp_speed  George_Gilder  income_inequality  tempo  operational_tempo  '90s  capitalism  digital_economy 
august 2017 by jerryking
We Survived Spreadsheets, and We’ll Survive AI - WSJ
By Greg Ip
Updated Aug. 2, 2017

History and economics show that when an input such as energy, communication or calculation becomes cheaper, we find many more uses for it. Some jobs become superfluous, but others more valuable, and brand new ones spring into existence. Why should AI be different?

Back in the 1860s, the British economist William Stanley Jevons noticed that when more-efficient steam engines reduced the coal needed to generate power, steam power became more widespread and coal consumption rose. More recently, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-led study found that as semiconductor manufacturers squeezed more computing power out of each unit of silicon, the demand for computing power shot up, and silicon consumption rose.

The “Jevons paradox” is true of information-based inputs, not just materials like coal and silicon......Just as spreadsheets drove costs down and demand up for calculations, machine learning—the application of AI to large data sets—will do the same for predictions, argue Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans and Avi Goldfarb, who teach at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. “Prediction about uncertain states of the world is an input into decision making,” they wrote in a recent paper. .....Unlike spreadsheets, machine learning doesn’t yield exact answers. But it reduces the uncertainty around different risks. For example, AI makes mammograms more accurate, the authors note, so doctors can better judge when to conduct invasive biopsies. That makes the doctor’s judgment more valuable......Machine learning is statistics on steroids: It uses powerful algorithms and computers to analyze far more inputs, such as the millions of pixels in a digital picture, and not just numbers but images and sounds. It turns combinations of variables into yet more variables, until it maximizes its success on questions such as “is this a picture of a dog” or at tasks such as “persuade the viewer to click on this link.”.....Yet as AI gets cheaper, so its potential applications will grow. Just as better weather forecasting makes us more willing to go out without an umbrella, Mr. Manzi says, AI emboldens companies to test more products, strategies and hunches: “Theories become lightweight and disposable.” They need people who know how to use it, and how to act on the results.
artificial_intelligence  Greg_Ip  spreadsheets  machine_learning  predictions  paradoxes  Jim_Manzi  experimentation  testing  massive_data_sets  judgment  uncertainty  economists  algorithms  MIT  Gilder's_Law  speed  operational_tempo  Jevons_paradox  decision_making  steam_engine  William_Jevons 
august 2017 by jerryking
Ford CEO: Decision-Making ‘Shot Clock’ Needed to Accelerate Plans - WSJ
By Christina Rogers
Updated June 30, 2017

Ford Motor Co.’s new Chief Executive Jim Hackett is enforcing a “shot clock” on lingering decisions at the auto maker to put plans into action faster and regain competitive footing in vital segments of the car business.

Mr. Hackett, speaking to analysts this week, rolled out the shot-clock idea—which is borrowed from a rule employed in basketball to quicken the pace of the game—as part of his agenda for the first 100 days in a job he took over in May. He spoke Thursday with Wall Street analysts, the first such meeting for Ford’s new chief as he confronts an underperforming stock price.

The company has been widely criticized for appearing indecisive on important technology bets, including self-driving cars or electric vehicles.

In addition to setting firmer deadlines on decisions, Mr. Hackett said he plans to focus on costs, according to analysts’ reports recounting the event. He wants to move faster to target weaknesses in the business, such as slumping U.S. sedan sales.......Ford is now investing in autonomous-vehicle research, including taking financial stakes in startups, and is spending more than $4 billion to improve its electric-car lineup.
operational_tempo  decision_making  Jim_Hackett  Ford  automotive_industry  electric_cars  autonomous_vehicles  accelerated_lifecycles  clock_speed  indecision  shot_clock 
june 2017 by jerryking
Wall Street to CEOs: Disrupt Your Industry, or Else
May 26, 2017 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims

Investors and boards are hunting for corporate leaders who can move quickly to fend off upstarts and place big bets on disruptive tech.......For pretty much any industry you can name—not just autos but manufacturing, logistics, finance, media and of course retail—there are tech startups purporting to have better ideas, ones they say they don’t need decades to make into realities. It isn’t as if all these industries will see massive CEO turnover, but it does mean established companies need to consider drastic measures. They must be willing to tell their stakeholders they may have to lose money and cannibalize existing products and services, while scaling up new technologies and methods.

“Ten years ago, innovation was based on features and functions,”. “Now it’s about your business model and transforming your industry.”

Before, companies could innovate by acquiring tech startups. But the top disrupters now grow so quickly and capture so much market share, they become too valuable to buy or are unwilling to sell.....Act faster to satisfy shareholders.....Mickey Drexler, CEO of beleaguered J. Crew, admitted that if he could go back 10 years, he might have done things differently, to cope with the rapid transformation of retail by e-commerce. Who then would have predicted that in 2017, the No. 1 online retailer of clothing to millennials would be Amazon?....CEO turnover isn’t necessarily the only solution on the table....Companies also have to incubate potentially disruptive startups within their own corporate structures. This means protecting them as they develop, and being willing to absorb their losses for as long as their competitors do. Consider, for example, that Amazon made almost no profit for its first 20 years..... Wal-Mart’s e-commerce division increased sales 29% from a year earlier. Many analysts thought the company overpaid for Jet.com, which cost it $3.3 billion in August 2016. But the acquisition brought e-commerce veteran Marc Lore, who became chief executive of Wal-Mart’s online operations and quickly replaced existing executives with members of his own team.
analog  business_models  CEOs  Christopher_Mims  disruption  e-commerce  leaders  LVMH  operational_tempo  risk-taking  transformational  turnover  Jet  Wal-Mart  Wall_Street 
may 2017 by jerryking
Instagram Finds Focus Under ‘Efficiency Guru’
April 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Deepa Seetharaman

Ms. Levine’s biggest contribution, Mr. Systrom says, is helping Instagram avoid the fate analyst Ben Thompson described: “Companies break every time they double.” [See reference to sublinearity in new book of Geoffrey West, “Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies” (Penguin). Specifically, "infrastructure growth scales in analogous sublinear fashion]

In 2014, Mr. Systrom said he realized he and his co-founder, Mike Krieger, needed help to grow Instagram. Facebook had bought the startup for $1 billion two years earlier, when it had just 13 employees. The pressure was on for Instagram to make money and roll out products at a more rapid clip, and the co-founders saw the need for an executive to manage the expansion.

Marne Levine is “an efficiency guru” who has helped the Instagram app avoid some of the pitfalls of rapid growth. Ms. Levine has skills that are in high demand in Silicon Valley, where startups often struggle to get past their adolescence. Uber Technologies Inc., for instance, is seeking a second-in-command to help founder Travis Kalanick repair the ride-sharing company’s image after allegations of sexism and sexual harassment and the departure of several top executives. “We want to be the 10x company,” Ms. Levine, 46, says. “That means we need to think carefully about how we set up our operations, how we grow and how we scale.”.....A seasoned manager can instill discipline and order, helping new companies avoid wasting time and resources while adding a veneer of professionalism to attract potential customers.
Instagram  Facebook  focus  scaling  growth  Snap  Snapchat  expansions  COO  efficiencies  sublinearity  powerlaw  product_launches  speed  blitzscaling  operational_tempo  10x 
april 2017 by jerryking
Ben Chestnut of MailChimp: Learn to Love the Job You’ve Got - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT SEPT. 2, 2016

What are some leadership lessons?

Never sacrifice momentum. I might know a better path, but if we’ve got a lot of momentum, if everyone’s united and they’re marching together and the path is O.K., just go with the flow. I may eventually nudge them down a new path, but never stop the troops midmarch.
CEOs  leadership  lessons_learned  momentum  operational_tempo 
september 2016 by jerryking
Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s Lessons Learned - WSJ
By ALEXANDRA WOLFE
May 8, 2015

Next week, Gen. McChrystal will release a new book, “Team of Teams,” in which he describes how he and his staff remade the Joint Special Operations Task Force in the Middle East to fight a new kind of decentralized, tech-savvy enemy. (The book is co-written by Tantum Collins, David Silverman and Chris Fussell.) The general remade the Task Force in part by using technology such as daily videoconferences to create something he calls “shared consciousness.” The goal was to empower subordinate units to make decisions far more quickly and with greater precision than a traditional hierarchy could. It wasn’t easy. “In some ways, the military has sort of invented bureaucracy,”
Stanley_McChrystal  JSOC  lessons_learned  books  teams  operational_tempo  shared_consciousness 
may 2015 by jerryking
From War Room to Boardroom: Leadership Lessons From Two Generals - WSJ
Dec. 8, 2014 | WSJ |

Start to build relationships so that you have something to fall back on when you disagree on the issues.

What leadership lessons should we take from the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan?

GEN. MCCHRYSTAL: The first thing is we didn’t do due diligence before we went in. We didn’t understand the problem to the depth that we needed to. We didn’t take the time to do it, and we didn’t nurture the experts.

If we gathered all the Pashtun and Arabic speakers in the U.S. military, we could probably fit them on this stage. And yet, after World War II began, after Pearl Harbor, we trained more than 5,000 military members to speak Japanese. We just haven’t made that level of effort.

The other thing is we go at this with different parts of our government. Every agency wants to help but they want to protect their equities, and you can’t do a complex endeavor like this unless you can build a truly integrated team in which everybody is focused.
leadership  lessons_learned  shared_consciousness  operational_tempo  Stanley_McChrystal  teams  NSC  security_&_intelligence  generalship  ISIS  al_Qaeda  Taliban  learning_organizations  adaptability  decision_making  speed  languages  Arabic  Pashtun  relationships 
december 2014 by jerryking
Bob Pittman of Clear Channel, on the Value of Dissent - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: November 16, 2013
discussing an idea, “What did the dissenter say?” The first time you do that, somebody might say, “Well, everybody’s on board.” Then I’ll say, “Well, you guys aren’t listening very well, because there’s always another point of view somewhere and you need to go back and find out what the dissenting point of view is.” I don’t want to hear someone say after we do something, “Oh, we should have done this.”

I want us to listen to these dissenters because they may intend to tell you why we can’t do something, but if you listen hard, what they’re really telling you is what you must do to get something done....“You’ll never be fired here for making a mistake. You’ll be fired for not making a mistake. Because if you’re not making a mistake, it tells me that you’re not trying anything new.”...“Weed the garden.” If you try 10 new things and, just for example, two are clear winners and two are clear losers. That means you’ve got six in between. What do I do with those? Most organizations — and when I’m not careful, including me — let everything live except the clear losers....only going to let clear winners live. I’m going to take the resources I put for the other eight things and try again,”...

Urgency wins. There are times when people come in with a presentation, and I’ll say: “What is it you want from me? What is the decision?” I find 70 percent of the time, I don’t need to know any of the other stuff. I’ll just say, “Do this or that” and we’ve saved 50 minutes. Although it may come across as impatience, it really allows us to move faster.
Clear_Channel  attrition_rates  CEOs  dissension  impatience  portfolios  kill_rates  momentum  operational_tempo  urgency 
november 2013 by jerryking
Jurgen Klinsmann Has U.S. Soccer Team Speaking German - WSJ.com
June 19, 2013 | WSJ | By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN.

When head coach Jurgen Klinsmann, the former German star, took over this band of oddly self-satisfied athletes two years ago, he promised to change the culture of U.S. soccer at the highest level. He aimed to build a side that played with both discipline and fury—one that could compete consistently with the best soccer nations. In other words, to turn them into... perhaps not Germany exactly, but something like it....Players talk constantly now about wearing out opponents rather than surviving them, of wanting to enforce their will on games and not simply being satisfied with that staple of American soccer from toddlerhood on—the trophy for participation. "Jurgen has instilled that mentality to fight for every ball, to play your role, to not take plays off," midfielder Graham Zusi said after Tuesday's win. "If we do that we can eventually grind a team down." In other words, what Germans do......"It is what is required to play well internationally. You got to play fast. You got to play at a high tempo, you got to play both ways, get behind the ball and be going forward. If you're going to be with the best in the world, this is what you got to do."

He has conveyed his message with the subtlety of a Wagnerian symphony. He belittled the accomplishments of his top players, booted team captain Carlos Bocanegra, even temporarily dropped Jozy Altidore, the team's top striker, all in an effort to teach these big fish in the smallish pond of U.S. soccer they need to burn to get better. His message, that international soccer is no joke, seems to be sinking in.
soccer  German  coaching  organizational_culture  team  hustle  operational_tempo  attitudes  grit  mindsets  fingerspitzengefühl  tempo  momentum 
june 2013 by jerryking
New Model Army - WSJ.com
February 3, 2004 | WSJ |By DONALD H. RUMSFELD.

Our troops have performed magnificently -- despite the significant increase in operational tempo of the global war on terror, which has increased the demand on the force.

Managing that demand is one of the Department of Defense's top priorities. Doing so means being clear about the problem, and fashioning the most appropriate solutions. Much of the current increase in demand on the force is most likely a temporary spike caused by the deployment of nearly 115,000 troops to Iraq. We do not expect to have 115,000 troops permanently deployed in any one campaign....That should tell us something. It tells us that the real problem is not necessarily the size of our active and reserve military components, per se, but rather how forces have been managed, and the mix of capabilities at our disposal....Army Chief of Staff Gen. Pete Schoomaker compares the problem to a barrel of rainwater on which the spigot is placed too high up. The result: when you turn it on, it only draws water off the top, while the water at the bottom is not accessible or used. Our real problem is that the way our total force is presently managed, we have to use many of the same people over and over again. In Gen. Schoomaker's analogy, the answer is not a bigger barrel of more than the current 2.6 million men and women available, but to move the spigot down, so more of the potentially available troops are accessible, usable, and available to defend our nation.
Donald_Rumsfeld  U.S._military  operational_tempo  managing_demand  modularity  U.S._Army  tempo  Pentagon  SecDef 
may 2012 by jerryking
Understanding change in a business
The Globe and Mail. Seventy per cent of big changes in a company fail; John Kotter explains why

The Kotter model

In the 90s Harvard-professor John P. Kotter had been observing this process for almost 30 years. In his book Leading Change he argues that to make big changes significantly and effectively, there are generally eight basic things that must happen:

INSTILL A SENSE OF URGENCY. Identifying existing or potential crises or opportunities. Confronting reality, in the words of Execution-authors, Charan and Bossidy.
BUILD A GUIDING COALITION. Assembling a strong guiding coalition with enough power to lead the change effort. And make them work as a team, not a committee!
CREATE A VISION AND SUPPORTING STRATEGIES. We need a clear sense of purpose and direction. In less successful situations you generally find plans and budgets, but no vision and strategy; or the strategies are so superficial that they have no credibility.
COMMUNICATE. As many people as possible need to hear the mandate for change loud and clear, with messages sent out consistently and often. Forget the boring memos that nobody reads! Try using videos, speeches, kick-off meetings, workshops in small units, etc. Also important is the teaching of new behaviours by the example of the guiding coalition
REMOVE OBSTACLES. Get rid of anything blocking change, like bosses stuck in the old ways or lack of information systems. Encourage risk-taking and non-traditional ideas, activities, and actions. Empowerment is moving obstacles out of peoples' way so they can make something happen, once they've got the vision clear in their heads.
CREATE SOME QUICK WINS. This is essential for creating momentum and providing sufficient credibility to pat the hard-working people on the back and to diffuse the cynics. Remember to recognize and reward employees involved in the improvements.
KEEP ON CHANGING. After change organizations get rolling and have some wins, they don't stop there. They go back and make wave after wave of other actions necessary for long-term, significant change. Successful change leaders don't drop the sense of urgency. On top of that, they are very systematic about figuring out all of the pieces they need to have in place before they declare victory.
MAKE CHANGE STICK. The last big step is nailing big change to the floor and making sure it sticks. And the way things stick is through culture. If you can create a totally new culture around some new way of managing, it will stay. It won't live on if it is dependent on one boss or a couple of enthusiastic people who will eventually move on.

Kotter.gif

We can divide these eight steps in three main processes. The first four steps focus on de-freezing the organization. The next three steps make change happen. The last step re-freezes the organization on the next rung on the ladder.

Kotter avoids any discussion re how this high level approach ties into Project Management. Anderson & Anderson (The Change Leaders Roadmap) adopt a similar high level approach however do tie it into the lower level by adding in a lot of trad. PM items.
backlash  John_Kotter  organizational_change  change_management  urgency  Communicating_&_Connecting  roadmaps  change_agents  risk-taking  obstacles  obstructionism  entrenchment  quick_wins  non-traditional  shared_consciousness  momentum  operational_tempo  project_management  action_plans  eels  emotional_commitment  buy-in  resistance 
october 2010 by jerryking
Speed Demons: How smart companies are creating new products -- and whole new businesses -- almost overnight
MARCH 27, 2006 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm. Speed is
emerging as the ultimate competitive weapon. Some of the world's most
successful companies are proving to be expert at spotting new
opportunities, marshaling their forces, and bringing to market new
products or services in a flash. That goes for launching whole new
ventures, too. (1) FIND NEW WAYS TO SPOT HITS; (2) KEEP YOUR LAUNCH TEAM
AGILE; (3), BREAK YOUR UNWRITTEN RULES; (4) HAND OFF TASKS TO
SPECIALISTS; (5) ONCE YOU HAVE IT RIGHT, REPEAT.
Steve_Hamm  speed  spinups  opportunities  operational_tempo  best_practices  new_products  new_categories  product_category  new_businesses  overlooked_opportunities 
october 2009 by jerryking
Recession 101: Courses for a Crisis - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 18, 2009 WSJ article by ALINA DIZIK. Article focuses
on how business schools are dreaming up a series of new offerings. Some
schools are changing the focus of programs by combining classic business
topics with rapidly developing research about the downturn. To that
end, business schools are creating new exec-ed courses in the space of
weeks or months.
executive_management  executive_education  business_schools  Colleges_&_Universities  MBAs  economic_downturn  nimbleness  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  accelerated_lifecycles  operational_tempo  new_products  product_launches 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read