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jerryking : opportunistic   29

You must do these two difficult things to invest as patiently as the greats - The Globe and Mail
TOM BRADLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017

Great investors have differences, but they share a number of key attributes.

They have an independent view. They feel no obligation to invest in something because others are doing it or because it’s a part of an index. Indeed, they prefer when a stock isn’t popular or heavily traded.

They buy when opportunities present themselves, not when the money is available. Cash doesn’t burn a hole in their pocket.

They buy assets that, in their reasoned opinion, will eventually be worth considerably more than they’re able to purchase them for. The key word being eventually. Their time frame is only slightly shorter than that.

They don’t get hung up on short-term events, although they do monitor them closely so they can take advantage of opportunities. Price movements and/or liquidity events may allow them to buy more or sell, and any new information can be used to update their valuation models.

You get the picture. Patient capital is focused on long-term value creation. It’s comfortable being out-of-sync with popular trends. And it doesn’t get distressed by market dislocations, it gets excited.

If working with a financial adviser, they have to understand and believe in the patient-capital approach. No prattling from them about quick stock or ETF flips. No recommendations of "hot" fund managers nor cold feet when short-term results are poor.

You want advisers and money managers who can live up to the traits listed above and, ideally, who are working in organizations that exemplify the same traits. You and your adviser have a better chance of being “patient capital” if the firm’s sales, marketing, product development and investment strategies are aligned.
Tom_Bradley  investors  long-term  strategic_patience  liquidity_events  personality_types/traits  dislocations  undervalued  opportunistic  unanimity  personal_finance  financial_advisors  contrarians  independent_viewpoints  financial_pornography  best_of 
january 2017 by jerryking
Steven Mnuchin’s Defining Moment: Seizing Opportunity From the Financial Crisis - WSJ
By RACHEL LOUISE ENSIGN, ANUPREETA DAS and REBECCA BALLHAUS
Updated Dec. 1, 2016.

Federal officials expected to suffer as much as $8 billion in losses from IndyMac. That left regulators looking for someone to take over the bank and mitigate the damage. Speed was essential, since the FDIC was bracing for a wave of additional bank failures.

Mr. Mnuchin assembled an all-star cast drawn from his years on Wall Street, including Mr. Soros, hedge-fund manager John Paulson, billionaire Michael Dell’s investment firm and several former Goldman executives, including J. Christopher Flowers. They signed up on the basis that Mr. Mnuchin would personally run the bank, according to people familiar with the matter.

By now, he knew that few bidders would be willing to buy all the failed bank’s assets. And he knew he was taking a giant risk.

At the end of 2008, Mr. Mnuchin persuaded the FDIC to sell IndyMac for about $1.5 billion. The deal included IndyMac branches, deposits and assets. The FDIC also agreed to protect the buyers from the most severe losses for years. That loss-sharing arrangement turned out to be a master stroke.
Carpe_diem  creating_opportunities  defining_moments  economic_downturn  financial_services  Goldman_Sachs  kairos  opportunistic  rainmaking  risk-mitigation  risk-sharing  seminal_moments  Steven_Mnuchin  turnarounds  vulture_investing 
december 2016 by jerryking
Dear Americans: Welcome to Canada - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May 09, 2016
Campaign_2016  Donald_Trump  crossborder  opportunistic  immigrants  U.S. 
may 2016 by jerryking
Don’t Confuse Jeremy Piven with Ari Gold - NYTimes.com
By RUTH LA FERLA APRIL 17, 2015

Ari “leads through intimidation,” he said. “He’s an equal opportunity offender.” Selfridge, on the other hand, “operates from the heart.”

Mr. Piven himself seems to operate from a disarming mixture of naked self-interest and an unalloyed passion for his métier. Before “Entourage,” he said: “I was never progressing. I was still the schlumpy best friend No. 6.”

During lunch the next day at Bubby’s, a favorite haunt in TriBeCa, he picked up the thread. “I’ve been the underdog my entire life — 1,000 percent,” he said. But Mr. Piven is nothing if not tenacious. “Beyond sharp elbows, you’ve got to create your own work,” he said, “to make a meal out of the scraps that you’re given.”

Early in the taping of “Entourage,” which ran for eight seasons on HBO starting in 2004, he hogged the camera and filled dead air with a barrage of hastily improvised banter. “It was awkward at first,” he acknowledged. “People were asking, ‘Who is this guy and what does he think he is doing?’

“But I just kept talking and they didn’t yell, ‘Cut.’ And suddenly one scene turns to three.”
creating_opportunities  Entourage  actors  television  funnies  underdogs  tenacity  rainmaking  value_creation  opportunistic  creating_valuable_content 
april 2015 by jerryking
Where to Look for Insight
Mohanbir Sawhney Sanjay Khosla
FROM THE NOVEMBER 2014
Innovation isn’t a department. It’s a mindset that should permeate your entire enterprise.

No matter the venue, the feedstock for innovation is insight—an imaginative understanding of an internal or external opportunity that can be tapped to improve efficiency, generate revenue, or boost engagement. Insights can be about stakeholder needs, market dynamics, or even how your company works.

Here are Seven Insight Channels
Anomalies

Examine deviations from the norm
Do you see unexpectedly high or low revenue or share in a market or segment? Surprise performance from a business process or a company unit?

Confluence

Find macro trend intersections

What key economic, behavioral, technological, or demographic trends do you see? How are they combining to create opportunities?

Frustrations

Pinpoint deficiencies in the system

Where are customer pain points for your products, services, or solutions? Which organizational processes or practices annoy you and your colleagues?

Orthodoxies

Question conventional beliefs
Are there assumptions or beliefs in your industry that go unexamined? Toxic behaviors or procedures at your company that go unchallenged?

Extremities

Exploit deviance
What can you learn from the behaviors and needs of your leading-edge or laggard customers, employees, or suppliers?

Voyages

Learn from immersion elsewhere
How are your stakeholders’ needs influenced by their sociocultural context?

Analogies

Borrow from other industries or organizations
What successful innovations do you see applied in other disciplines? Can you adapt them for your own?
trend_spotting  creating_opportunities  customer_insights  HBR  analogies  anomalies  trends  pain_points  assumptions  innovation  insights  conventional_wisdom  travel  laggards  copycats  dilemmas  extremes  orthodoxy  immersive  deviance  learning_journeys  leading-edge  unexpected  mindsets  frictions  opportunities  opportunistic  consumer_behavior  feedstock  toxic_behaviors 
november 2014 by jerryking
Meet Bay St.'s new breed of deal makers
April 4, 2007 | G&M pg. B10 | by Jacquie McNish.

Days after Ottawa's Halloween clampdown on income trusts, a team of Bay Street dealmakers flew to New York to alert a handful of private equity funds to potential Canadian trust takeovers.

Investment bankers pitch deals to ravenous private equity buyers all the time, but this group was unique because they were lawyers.

Canadian firms can no longer be complacent about private equity deals. As traditional Canadian corporate clients fall on the takeover battleground, Canada’s major firms are moving quickly to grab their share of private equity deals.

Some law firms are wooing private equity funds by aggressively promoting deals, while most are starting to share risks by taking fee cuts on unsuccessful takeovers and pocketing fee premiums on deal victories.

A few are so eager to represent the powerful acquirers that a single firm will act for multiple buyers vying for the same target.

The deal frenzy is shifting legal M&A away from long-term relationships to a more transaction-oriented practice that is seeing firms hop in and out of deals with an ever-changing group of buyers and sellers.

Stephen Donovan, co-head of Torys’ Private Equity Group, adds, "It is no longer enough to just know the law. There is a much more deliberate effort to bring deals to clients."
deal-making  dealmakers  lawyers  law_firms  Bay_Street  private_equity  prospectuses  complacency  crossborder  M&A  risk-sharing  transactions  relationships  transactional_relationships  rescue_investing  pitches  proactivity  entrepreneurial  opportunistic 
january 2013 by jerryking
Two Women Pitch In During Hard Times And Find Big Rewards
July 20, 1999 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

Two Women Pitch In During Hard Times... Hard times don't necessarily mean hunkering down or looking for greener pastures. It can be a time to take on more responsibility and expand your skills.
Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  opportunities  hard_times  opportunistic  bankruptcies  women  adversity 
december 2012 by jerryking
Ten ways to become a tenacious marketer -
Sep. 16, 2011 | G & M | RYAN CALIGIURI.

Here are 10 ways to become a more tenacious marketer:
(1) Test and benchmark. test different strategies and gauge what works best. One technique is called split testing.
(2) Always have a strategy. A strategy pts. you in the right direction & ensures your actions build to something.
(3) Always be on the lookout for revenue-generating opportunities.
(4) Be direct-response driven
(5) Get personal
(6) Get more out of a website.
(7) Deliver more value
(8) Show commitment
(9) Be driven by referrals
(10) Focus on the most likely buyers
direct-response  marketing  tips  experimentation  benchmarking  trial_&_error  strategy  commitments  opportunistic  websites  referrals  JCK  growth_hacking  Ryan_Caligiuri  strategic_thinking  tenacity  revenue_generation  overdeliver 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Start-Up of You - NYTimes.com
July 12, 2011 | NYT | Tom Friedman. Reid Hoffman, has a book
coming out in 2012 called “The Start-Up of You,” co-authored with Ben
Casnocha. Its subtitle could easily be: “Hey, recent graduates! Hey,
35-year-old midcareer professional! Here’s how you build your career
today.” ....Hoffman argues that professionals need an entirely new
mind-set & skill set to compete. “The old paradigm of climb up a
stable career ladder is dead & gone,” “No career is a sure thing
anymore. The uncertain, rapidly changing conditions in which
entrepreneurs start companies is what it’s like for fashioning a career.
Therefore, approach career strategy the same way an entrepreneur
approaches starting a business.” Ditch the grand life plan.
Entrepreneurs don’t write a 100-pg. biz plan and execute it one time; be
emergent....use your netwk. to pull in info. & intelligence about
where the growth opportunities are [this would be knowledge or market intelligence] — & invest in yourself to build [transferrable] skills that will allow you to profit from those opportunities.
books  career  career_paths  emergent  entrepreneurship  individual_initiative  invest_in_yourself  LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  market_intelligence  opportunistic  pattern_recognition  new_graduates  rapid_change  Reid_Hoffman  start_ups  Tom_Friedman  transferable_skills 
july 2011 by jerryking
Next year, be ahead of the competition
Dec. 27, 2010 | Financial Post | Rick Spence

Look for ways to add more value. In tough times, most marketers look for
ways to claw back some of the value they offer their customers, as a
way to preserve margins; you can stand out by offering more. Henry Ford
said it best: "The man who will use his skill and constructive
imagination to see how much he can give for a dollar, instead of how
little he can give for a dollar, is bound to succeed."
Rick_Spence  advice  self-improvement  opportunities  opportunistic  value_creation  perks  hard_times 
december 2010 by jerryking
Dragon on hunt for 'new product ideas'
Nov 6, 2010. | Financial Times pg. 36 | by Jonathan Moules.
Richard Farleigh, who rose to fame as an investor on the TV show
Dragons' Den, has claimed that he is now busier than ever putting $ into
ambitious start-ups. The serial entrepreneur claimed that now is a
crucial time to be doing deals because so many promising ventures are in
need of cash. "At times like this you have to be investing, rescuing
things and doing good deals," he said. "There are a lot of people out
there that cannot get funding and they are relatively low risk."
Farleigh has made more than 70 investments to date in a variety of
sectors, including the private members' club Home House in London. His
preference is to back disruptive business models where he can help
develop strategy. "The kinds [of businesses] I am interested in are new
product ideas. They can have monopoly pricing and a large share of a
new market."
ProQuest  opportunistic  opportunities  start_ups  serial_entrepreneur  United_Kingdom  angels  ideas  new_products 
november 2010 by jerryking
Case Study: Sometimes the Market Tells You What It Needs
Jan 10, 2006 | WSJ | Paulette Thomas. .Patrick Martucci
leapfrogged to increasingly challenging jobs across the telecom
industry, setting up distn. channels, running sales depts. An
opportunity arose when he worked at a company that provided maintenance
on Rolm phone equip.. Martucci pitched J.C. Penney, which, after a
trial, offered the maintenance contract for the entire retail chain's
phone service. But his company handled only Rolm equip.in specific
geographies, not the full sprawl of a retailer with a mishmash of phone
sys. Martucci saw what could have been "a $10 M contract go to $1.5 M"
THE SOLUTION: From Chicago, he launched United Asset Coverage, which
would informally stitch together a network to fix anyone's office equip.
-- no matter the brand nor the place, a managed-care approach to the
frustrating world of office-machine maintenance. Martucci told a small
VC fund. "It's a $36 B marketplace & I'm familiar with it,". They
invested a total of "a couple million" $.
voicemail  entrepreneur  opportunistic  maintenance  product_launches  telecommunications  disorganization  retailers  J.C._Penney  managed-care  demand-driven  customer-driven  case_studies  nationwide 
october 2010 by jerryking
Facing Budget Gaps, Cities Sell Parking, Airports, Zoos, Other Assets - WSJ.com
AUGUST 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By IANTHE JEANNE DUGAN.

The privatization trend is being spurred by a cottage industry of consultants, lawyers and bankers. Allen & Overy, a New York law firm, dubs it "rescue investing" and recently provided investors a booklet on "jurisdictions of opportunity"—municipalities whose laws, budget woes and credit ratings make them most likely to make deals [jk: unexploited_resources ].

"More public-private partnerships for public infrastructure in the U.S. have reached commercial and financial close than during any comparable period in U.S. history," the booklet says.
airports  assets  austerity  cities  cottage_industries  cutbacks  deal-making  dealmakers  divestitures  entrepreneurial  fallen_angels  infrastructure  investors  law_firms  lawyers  municipalities  opportunities  opportunistic  parking_lots  pitches  PPP  privatization  prospectuses  rescue_investing  unexploited_resources  vulture_investing 
august 2010 by jerryking
Now is the moment to seize your opportunity
May 5, 2010 | Financial Times. pg. 10 | Luke Johnson.
Luke_Johnson  ProQuest  opportunistic  kairos 
may 2010 by jerryking
State Bank & Trust Chief Finds Success in Failures - WSJ.com
APRIL 3, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By RICK BROOKS. A Banker Finds Cash Cow in Failures
community_banking  failure  opportunistic  lending  cash_cows 
april 2010 by jerryking
No Risk, No Reward
December 19, 2007 | Fast Company | by Keith H. Hammonds.
"Wealth is created during periods of uncertainty," Wind says. "You can
go back to Frank Knight,* who said in 1921 that the only risk that leads
to profit is unique uncertainty. Making money depends on identifying
opportunities in a turbulent marketplace."Frank H. Knight was cochair of
the department of economics at the University of Chicago from the 1920s
to the late 1940s. In his classic book published in 1921, Risk,
Uncertainty and Profit, he distinguished between risk and uncertainty.
Risk, he argued, was a randomness -- as in a game of roulette -- whose
probability could be determined. Uncertainty implied unknown and perhaps
unknowable probabilities. Will human cloning be commonplace in a
generation? That's an uncertainty. TRL Stacks 330.1 K54.11 Stacks
Retrieval Stacks Request Reference S-MR In Library
books  creativity  disequilibriums  innovation  instability  opportunistic  probabilities  quotes  randomness  risks  turbulence  uncertainty  unknowables  unknowns  weather  wealth_creation 
december 2009 by jerryking
Mark Cuban a change genius: Entrepreneur sees it as an opportunity waiting to happen
Nov 10, 2000 | National Post. pg. C.2 | by Ellie Rubin.
Discusses a WORTH magazine profile of entrepreneur Mark Cuban. Rubin is
struck by his approach to creating opportunity--his unique ability to
exploit change. Inefficiencies, opportunities and frailties: the only
thing you can depend on in business is change--embrace it! In doing so,
you will inevitably bump up against an opportunity waiting to happen.
Or, in "Cuban" terms, you will develop "a knack for spotting
inefficiencies, opportunities and frailties." The best way to scope out
inefficiencies within an industry is to create a product or service
that has a certain sense of urgency to it, or "high pain threshold"
opportunities. By focusing on an area of inefficiency that is creating
dramatic financial, human resource or market share pressure, one will
find that the decision makers who are managing this "pain" are eager to
invest in a sound and reliable solution--quickly.
creating_opportunities  creative_thinking  opportunistic  opportunities  entrepreneur  Mark_Cuban  inspiration  inefficiencies  problem_solving  wealth_creation  urgency  pain_points  overlooked_opportunities  human_frailties  constant_change  rainmaking  frictions 
october 2009 by jerryking
Why Entrepreneurs Love a Downturn - Christopher Gergen and Gregg Vanourek
Tuesday August 26, 2008 | HarvardBusiness.org | by Christopher
Gergen and Gregg Vanourek who are the founding partners of New Mountain
Ventures, an entrepreneurial leadership development company.
economic_downturn  entrepreneur  creativity  opportunistic  adversity 
september 2009 by jerryking
Experience preferred
March 2008 | Globe and Mail | DOUG STEINER

Take advantage of opportunities, regardless of your age. Some abilities
actually sharpen as we age. Yes, short-term memory deteriorates—did I
take my daily mini-Aspirin last night? But other faculties can improve
with time. One is solving problems by recognizing patterns. Pattern
recognition also applies to your finances. As you get older, economic
crises that might scare a young person start to look more familiar, and
you can get better at dealing with them.
Doug_Steiner  experience  opportunistic  pattern_recognition  personal_finance  aging  problem_solving 
may 2009 by jerryking
Start-Ups Hungry For Public Morsels - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ.com
March 27, 2009, 07:19 PM EST| Wall Street Journal| by Christopher Zinsli

Start-ups are taking advantage of the downturn purchasing carve-outs from public companies.
start_ups  growth  opportunistic  carve_outs 
march 2009 by jerryking
There's no business like your own business
Tuesday, April 17, 2007, The Globe and Mail, Page B10. Profile
of serial entreprenreur Jay Jordon by TERRENCE BELFORD, Special
correspondent.
self-employment  wireless  opportunistic  Guyana  opportunities  serial_entrepreneur  Terrence_Belford  immigrants 
march 2009 by jerryking
Grand Openings in Grim Times - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 27, 2009, WSJ article by KATY MCLAUGHLIN on contrarian
chefs who are opening lavish new restaurants. Will they get burned?
opportunistic  restaurants  luxury  cost-cutting  restauranteurs  Katy_McLaughlin  hard_times 
march 2009 by jerryking
GM's Woe Has Tills Ringing in Singapore
19-Apr-2006 Financial Times article by Anonymous sources on the
windfall opportunities GM's decline has presented for a Global Crossing unit in Montreal to which handle logistics for its conference calls.
opportunistic  GM  Global_Crossing  Singapore  windfalls  decline 
february 2009 by jerryking
In Crisis, Opportunity for Obama - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 21, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | By GERALD F. SEIB.
Piece on Rahmn Emanuel's desire not to allow the financial crisis to go
to waste and an itemization of things that can be accomplished.
barack_obama  crisis  opportunistic  Rahmn_Emanuel  Gerald_Seib  chief_of_staff 
january 2009 by jerryking

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