recentpopularlog in

jerryking : optimism   17

Engaging with the world’s ills beats hiding in a bunker
OCTOBER 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Stephen Foley.

those with real ambition are not planning for a life underground down under. They are building philanthropic ventures to tackle the world’s ills, or striving to effect change through the political process, or starting new mission-driven businesses.

The bunker mentality is the polar opposite of the optimism displayed by the likes of Jeff Bezos, who set out his philanthropic credo in September alongside his plan to build a network of Montessori-inspired preschools across the US. He talked of his “belief in the potential for hard work from anyone to serve others”, from “business innovators who invent products that empower, authors who write books that inspire, government officials who serve their communities, teachers, doctors, carpenters, entertainers who make us laugh and cry, parents who raise children who go on to live lives of courage and compassion”.

“It fills me with gratitude and optimism,” he said, “to be part of a species so bent on self-improvement.”

Bezos has decided to focus his charity on children, as many of his peers have done. From Mark Zuckerberg promising to fund a technological revolution in the way kids are taught, to the slew of east coast hedge fund managers promoting charter schools as a way to shake-up public education, philanthropists know instinctively that childhood is their point of maximum leverage.....engagement trumps disengagement. Public service matters, even if one is only stealing apocalyptic proclamations from a presidential desk. It beats burying one’s head in the New Zealand soil.

Many of the world’s richest individuals are working to avert the war, pestilence or revolution that would make a withdrawal from society seem attractive in the first place. Philanthropists who are funding human rights campaigns, or drug research, or novel approaches to tackling inequality — these are the real survivalists.
apocalypses  bolt-holes  catastrophes  charities  childhood  children  disasters  disaster_preparedness  engaged_citizenry  hard_work  high_net_worth  Jeff_Bezos  mission-driven  moguls  Montessori  New_Zealand  novel  off-grid  optimism  Peter_Thiel  self-improvement  philanthropy  public_service  survivalists 
october 2018 by jerryking
Navigating a Breathtaking Level of Global Economic Change
November 14, 2017 |The New York Times | by Andrew Ross Sorkin.
you’d think that any sense of “faith” in the global economy might be shaken, or at least, uncertain given events like North Korea, Russian interference in elections in the United States, post-Brexit Europe, and hurricane damage.

Not so.

In conversation after conversation with some of the nation’s top business leaders and chief executives last week, there is a stunning amount of genuine “confidence” in our economy here and, yes, even globally.

“I’m very surprised,” Laurence D. Fink, the founder of BlackRock, the largest money manager in the world overseeing some $6 trillion, said at The New York Times DealBook conference last Thursday, describing his new sense of optimism.......Mark Cuban, whose disdain for President Trump is so acute that he is considering running for president himself in 2020 as a Republican because it “means you get to go head-on with Trump right in the primaries — and so there’s nothing I’d have more fun doing.” Still, though, he said he believes the economy is in good enough shape that when it comes to investing in the stock market, “I just, you know, I just let it ride.”

Mr. Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, said he keeps a small amount of cash on hand as a precaution. “I keep a little bit, you know, as a hedge. I call it my ‘Trump hedge’ because you just never know.....Earlier in 2017, The Conference Board reported that chief executives’ confidence had reached 2008 pre-recession highs in the first quarter.....there are pockets of the economy that are causing anxiety. “The last two or three years have not been fun whatsoever,” Mickey Drexler, the chairman of J. Crew, said at the conference about the traditional retail business, which has been upended by Amazon and changes in consumer behavior. “It’s been miserable.” Those challenges are extending to mall owners and commercial real estate, too..... is the stock market a proxy for the economy of America?....“In the aftermath of corporate and public-sector disasters, it often emerges that participants fell prey to a collective form of willful blindness and overconfidence: mounting warning signals were systematically cast aside or met with denial, evidence avoided or selectively reinterpreted, dissenters shunned,” Roland Bénabou a professor at Princeton University wrote in a seminal work on confidence and groupthink. “Market bubbles and manias exhibit the same pattern of investors acting ’colorblind in a sea of red flags,’ followed by a crash.”
confidence  Andrew_Sorkin  Mark_Cuban  Laurence_Fink  BlackRock  shifting_tastes  optimism  consumer_behavior  CEOs  J._Crew  Mickey_Drexler  commercial_real_estate  shopping_malls  warning_signs  groupthink  bubbles  overconfidence  precaution  global_economy  willful_blindness  manias  market_crash 
november 2017 by jerryking
Whites Have Huge Wealth Edge Over Blacks (but Don’t Know It) - The New York Times
By EMILY BADGER SEPT. 18, 2017

Americans believe that blacks and whites are more equal today than they truly are on measures of income, wealth, wages and health benefits. And they believe more historical progress has occurred than is the case, suggesting “a profound misperception of and unfounded optimism” regarding racial equality......we also overgeneralize from other markers of racial progress: the election of a black president, the passage of civil rights laws, the sea change in public opinion around issues like segregation. If society has progressed in these ways, we assume there’s been great economic progress, too.

We’re inclined, as well, to believe that society is fairer than it really is. The reality that it’s not — that even college-educated black workers earn about 20 percent less than college-educated white ones, for example — is uncomfortable for both blacks who’ve been harmed by that unfairness and whites who’ve benefited from it......If we want people to have a better understanding of racial inequality, this implies that the solution isn’t simply to parrot these statistics more widely. It’s to get Americans thinking more about the forces that underlie them, like continued discrimination in hiring, or disparities in mortgage lending.

It’s a myth that racial progress is inevitable, Ms. Richeson said. “But it’s also dangerous insofar as it keeps us blind to considerable inequality in our nation that’s quite foundational,” she said. “Of course we can’t address it if we’re not even willing to acknowledge it.”

And if we’re not willing to acknowledge it, she adds, that has direct consequences for whether Americans are willing to support affirmative action policies, or continued enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, or renewed efforts at school desegregation......
achievement_gaps  generational_wealth  misperceptions  African-Americans  optimism  whites  racial_disparities  infographics  white_privilege 
september 2017 by jerryking
How to Improve Resilience in Midlife
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By TARA PARKER-POPE.

“There is a naturally learnable set of behaviors that contribute to resilience,” said Dr. Grant, who, with Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook, wrote the book “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy.” “Those are the behaviors that we gravitate to more and more as we age.”

Scientists who study stress and resilience say it’s important to think of resilience as an emotional muscle that can be strengthened at any time. ......Here are some of the ways you can build your resilience in middle age.

■ Practice Optimism. Optimism is part genetic, part learned. So if you were born into a family of Eeyores, you can still find your inner Tigger.
■ Rewrite Your Story. When Dr. Charney was recovering from the shooting, he knew that his life was forever changed, but he reframed the situation, focusing on the opportunity the setback presented. “Once you are a trauma victim it stays with you,” he said. “But I knew I could be a role model. I have thousands of students watching my recovery. This gives me a chance to utilize what I’ve learned.”

Study after study has shown that we can benefit from reframing the personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves.
■ Don’t Personalize It. (i.e. self-defeating & self-doubt). We have a tendency to blame ourselves for life’s setbacks and to ruminate about what we should have done differently. In the moment, a difficult situation feels as if it will never end.
■ Remember Your Comebacks. When times are tough, we often remind ourselves that other people — like war refugees or a friend with cancer — have it worse.
■ Support Others. Resilience studies show that people are more resilient when they have strong support networks of friends and family to help them cope with a crisis. But you can get an even bigger resilience boost by giving support.
■ Take Stress Breaks. Times of manageable stress present an opportunity to build your resilience.
■ Go Out of Your Comfort Zone. Resilience doesn’t just come from negative experience. You can build your resilience by putting yourself in challenging situations.
discomforts  resilience  midlife  optimism  Sallie_Krawcheck  comebacks  reframing  serving_others  disconnecting  timeouts  personal_energy  Sheryl_Sandberg  Adam_Grant  living_in_the_moment  self-defeating  self-doubt 
july 2017 by jerryking
The Politics of Cowardice - The New York Times
David Brooks JAN. 27, 2017

Trump has changed the way the Republican Party sees the world. Republicans used to have a basic faith in the dynamism and openness of the free market. Now the party fears openness and competition.

In the summer of 2015, according to a Pew Research Center poll, Republicans said free trade deals had been good for the country by 51 to 39 percent. By the summer of 2016, Republicans said those deals had been bad for America by 61 percent to 32 percent.

It’s not that the deals had changed, or reality. It was that Donald Trump became the Republican nominee and his dark fearfulness became the party’s dark fearfulness. In this case fear is not a reaction to the world. It is a way of seeing the world. It propels your reactions to the world.
cowardice  David_Brooks  Donald_Trump  openness  Ronald_Reagan  '80s  GOP  FDR  optimism  free_markets  fear  threat_perception 
january 2017 by jerryking
Laurence Fink’s Optimistic Outlook - WSJ
Jan. 30, 2015 | WSJ | Op-ed

BlackRock manages $4.65 trillion worth of assets (as of the last quarter)—the investments of individuals, governments, pension funds and other global institutions. His firm advised the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department during the 2008 financial crisis, and since then, he has spent more time advising the public sector, sharing his views and predictions with the Obama administration and world leaders...BlackRock has more than 12,000 employees and more than 135 investment teams. They manage the portfolios of more than 7,700 clients, from sovereign-wealth funds to college endowments to corporations.....China is starting to provide more public-supported pensions and health care, but “it’s a fraction of what it should be,” Mr. Fink says. He is encouraged by China’s proposed fiscal reforms, such as steps to shift the country’s debt burden toward the central government, away from local authorities, improving efficiency.....Fink believes that many people haven’t paid enough attention to the displacement caused by technology. “Think of all the people who used to be in agriculture, and now it’s all mechanized,” he says. To offset this shift, Mr. Fink thinks that governments should invest in infrastructure to provide jobs and create capital. He also thinks that successful countries will train workers to be able to do skilled jobs, such as writing computer code or building machines.
Laurence_Fink  BlackRock  WEF_Davos  op-ed  optimism  job_destruction  job_displacement 
january 2015 by jerryking
New Year's Resolution 2002
1. Resolve to stay brutally optimistic.
2. Resolve to identify the most powerful benefit you offer to the people around you and then deliver it. (See below)
3. Resolve to pump up your personal vitality. How do I retain personal vitality?
[Personal vitality measures overall health in four key areas:
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Purpose – INTERESTING! (I believe that having a sense of individual life purpose is absolutely fundamental to personal happiness and contentment ]
4. Resolve to be habitually generous.
5. Resolve to go on a mental diet.
6. Resolve to be a global citizen, fully open to the cultures and influences of others.
7. Resolve to take control of your destiny.
8. Resolve to increase your human connectedness. Network.
9. Resolve to increase your creativity by letting go of the familiar. If innovation is everything, how do I institutionalize it in my personal life? Innovation ==> change strategy ==> succeed because they are subversive. Be a heretic!!!
10. Resolve to be you because others are already taken.

Practice adding value to things--ideas to make things worth more.
Practice adding value to people--what can I do to help my colleagues become more effective?
Practice adding value to myself--what can I do to make myself more valuable today?
heretical  inspiration  motivations  fitness  indispensable  serving_others  value_creation  resolutions  unconventional_thinking  JCK  affirmations  optimism  authenticity  generosity  Communicating_&_Connecting  subversion  purpose  networking  creative_renewal  personal_energy 
august 2012 by jerryking
The return of high-risk optimism - FT.com
May 1, 2008 3:00 am
The return of high-risk optimism

By John Gapper
Michael_Milken  high-risk  optimism 
june 2012 by jerryking
How to Plan for a Successful Retirement: Think Slow - WSJ.com
April 9, 2012 | WSJ | By DIANE COLE
So Much for Snap Decisions
A Nobel Prize winner explains why one secret to a successful retirement is to think 'slow'

the message that Daniel Kahneman, psychologist and Nobel Prize winner, delivers in his new book, "Thinking, Fast and Slow."

Typically, he says, people rely on blink-of-an-eye judgments, driven by emotion and impulse, in navigating life—even when we should be thinking "slow," using reason, deliberation and logic to weigh our options.

WSJ: In your book, you discuss overconfidence as a common pitfall. What impact does that have?

MR. KAHNEMAN: Overconfidence is everywhere. We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs. We just think they are biased.

When optimism and overconfidence come together, you get many mistakes. Optimistic estimates can in retrospect seem almost delusional. One example is that people end up paying about twice as much as they originally expected to pay for kitchen renovations.

DANIEL KAHNEMAN: 'We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs.'
DANIEL KAHNEMAN: 'We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs.' JON ROEMER
WSJ: Is there a way to keep our self-certainty from blocking out other evidence?

MR. KAHNEMAN: You can imagine yourself trying to make the case for your belief before a skeptical judge.

It is even better to try to construct the best possible case against your own position, because searching for arguments that support your position is unlikely to lead you to correct your mistakes.
book_reviews  decision_making  retirement  howto  personal_finance  planning  financial_planning  Daniel_Kahneman  gut_feelings  optimism  overconfidence  thinking_deliberatively  Nobel_Prizes  self-certainty 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Superball Economy - WSJ.com
March 3, 2003 | WSJ | By ANDY KESSLER.

Design is cheaper. If you look closely, Silicon Valley has very few manufacturers left. Chips are made in Taiwan, boards assembled in China or Thailand. We are now a Valley of designers. And there are lots of programmers and chip-heads and communications protocol folks walking the streets willing to work for much cheaper than three years ago. Office space is plentiful. Word has it there is space available for 50 cents per square foot per month, down from $12.

Bandwidth is cheaper. Global Crossing spent $12 billion on undersea fiber optics that someone is going to buy for $250 million. WorldCom and others have strung the U.S. with more fiber than in Frosted Mini-Wheats. And it won't be just for phone calls. Find companies that use that cheap bandwidth, and you'll find the boom.

Video is cheaper. Napster music sharing was child's play compared to what is next. Hours of video can be captured, stored and shared with today's cheap PCs and broadband lines. Jack Valenti, call your office.

Wireless data is cheaper. The Federal Communications Commission set aside frequencies for hospitals and microwave ovens that might interfere with phones or radar. This Industrial, Scientific and Medical block of spectrum is known as the junk band. While stupid telecom companies overbid for spectrum for third generation 3G cell phone devices, clever engineers figured out how to hop around the junk band -- letting out-of-work programmers surf job listings at Starbucks. Intel is putting these radios in many of their chips.

Distributed computing is cheaper. Google uses 12,000 cheap PCs to log the Internet so you can look up your neighbor and figure out how much she makes. Even distributed programming is cheaper. Microsoft's biggest problem is far-flung programmers creating operating systems like Linux at home in their pajamas. Bill Gates is reportedly all over the Valley asking for help to combat this "Open Source" nuisance.

About the only thing not cheap is capital. Venture capitalists are stingy, the IPO window is closed, and stocks are at four-year lows. Hmmm. Forget that last boom, it's ancient history. Look for new products not possible or too expensive three years ago. Slam down your new Superballs and be ready.
Andy_Kessler  Silicon_Valley  economic_downturn  protocols  recessions  optimism  design  bandwidth  open_source  new_products  distributed_computing  venture_capital  IPOs  inexpensive  cheap_revolution  abundance  economic_dynamism  leaps_of_faith  FCC  overpaid  wireless_spectrum 
may 2012 by jerryking
Master the power of 'no' - for positive results
.Nov 27, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 39 | Jonathan
Moules.The secret of knowing when to say 'no' is to understand the
difference between optimism and recklessness....[jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]........Tempting as some deals
are, it is often good entrepreneurial practice to turn them down.
Optimism is one of the defining traits of an entrepreneur, which is
probably why so many also find it hard to say 'no'. But being negative
can be a positive advantage at certain times. Steve Jobs, the
charismatic co-founder of Apple, once said that innovation, "comes from
saying 'no' to 1,000 things to make sure we don't get on the wrong track
or try to do too much". Saying 'no' to an offer of work, however, is
hard, especially if you are at the early stages of building a company
and especially in the current harsh economic climate when any paid
business seems like a scarce commodity.
ProQuest  business_development  small_business  self-discipline  Steve_Jobs  entrepreneur  optimism  say_"no"  recklessness 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Kids Will Be Alright - WSJ.com
JANUARY 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOEL KOTKIN.
The coming U.S. population boom will bring new economic vitality; the
resurgence of Fargo..." Entrepreneurialism and America's flexible
business culture—including the harnessing of entrepreneurial skills of
aging boomers—will prove critical to meeting this challenge. Many of the
individuals starting new firms will be those who have recently left or
been laid off by bigger companies, particularly during a severe economic
downturn. Whether they form a new bank, energy company or design firm,
they will do it more efficiently—with less overhead, more efficient use
of the Internet and less emphasis on pretentious office settings.
"....What drives immigrants is their optimism in America's future.
Joel_Kotkin  population_growth  U.S.  entrepreneurship  immigrants  optimism  aging  baby_boomers 
august 2010 by jerryking
If at First You Don't Succeed, You're in Excellent Company - WSJ.com
April 29, 2008 WSJ article by Melinda Beck about
"self-efficacy" that allows some people to rebound from defeats and go
onto greatness while others throw int he towel.

Self-efficacy differs from self-esteem in that it's a judgment of specific capabilities rather than a general feeling of self-worth. "It's easy to have high self-esteem -- just aim low," says Prof. Bandura, who is still teaching at Stanford at age 82. On the other hand, he notes, there are people with high self-efficacy who "drive themselves hard but have low self-esteem because their performance always falls short of their high standards."

Still, such people succeed because they believe that persistent effort will let them succeed. In fact, if success comes too easily, some people never master the ability to learn from criticism. "People need to learn how to manage failure so it's informational and not demoralizing,".....In technology, rejection is the rule rather than the exception, Prof. Bandura says. He points out that one of the original Warner Brothers said of sound films, "Who the hell wants to hear actors talk?" Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak were rebuffed by Atari Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co. when they tried to sell an early Apple computer. And sometimes genius itself needs time. It took Thomas Edison 1,000 tries before he invented the light bulb. ("I didn't fail 1,000 times," he told a reporter. "The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.")...Where does such determination come from? In some cases it's inborn optimism -- akin to the kind of resilience that enables some children to emerge unscathed from extreme poverty, tragedy or abuse. Self-efficacy can also be acquired by mastering a task; by modeling the behavior of others who have succeeded; and from what Prof. Bandura calls "verbal persuasion" -- getting effective encouragement that is tied to achievement, rather than empty praise..... "You can develop a resilient mindset at any age," says Robert Brooks, a Harvard Medical School psychologist who has studied resilience for decades. One key, he says, is to avoid self-defeating assumptions. If you are fired or dumped by a girlfriend, don't magnify the rejection and assume you'll never get another job or another date. (Maintaining perspective can be tough in the face of sweeping criticism, though. A teacher said of young G.K. Chesteron, who went on to become a renowned British author, that if his head were opened "we should not find any brain but only a lump of white fat.")

And don't allow a rejection to derail your dreams. "One of the greatest impediments to life is the fear of humiliation," says Prof. Brooks, who says he's worked with people who have spent the last 30 years of their lives not taking any risks or challenges because they are afraid of making mistakes.
resilience  optimism  inspiration  risk-taking  bouncing_back  Melinda_Beck  perseverance  self-efficacy  self-esteem  self-worth  persistence  humiliation  rejections  sense_of_proportion  personal_standards  affirmations  grit  Thomas_Edison  self-defeating 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read