recentpopularlog in

jerryking : out-of-wedlock   3

Memo to Toronto school board: Are you nuts?
February 2, 2008 | G& M pg. A23 | Jeffrey Simpson.

Given the provincial election results, it is hard to fathom how the Toronto District School Board could be sanctioning "Afrocentric schools" that, although theoretically open to all, are clearly designed for black students only, or almost only. How could it be that having rejected an extension of religiously based schools just a few months ago, the province's largest city will now countenance the creation of racially based ones?

Of course, the board was pressured, as boards often are, by interest groups with a cause - in this case, the theory that inadequate educational achievement can be improved by changing the curriculum. That poor achievement - a 40 per cent dropout rate by black students - is supposed to be lowered if the curriculum is more Afrocentric, which will be quite a trick in mathematics, physics, biology, foreign languages, basic civics, and even the broad sweep of world and Canadian history.
The theory is largely unsound. The much more frequent explanations for poor student achievement, for blacks or any other group, have much less to do with curriculum than factors over which schools have little control: dysfunctional families, troubled neighbourhoods, few role models (absent fathers), poverty, gangs or, in a few immigrant communities, attitudes toward education (especially for females) that are not easily reconciled with mainstream Canadian ones.

All the discourse about inclusiveness, that usually forms a staple of trendy, leftish discourse, has been discarded by the Toronto board in favour of its opposite: membership based overwhelmingly on one characteristic of the human and educational experience - race. As such, it is at profound variance with an important goal of a "public" school system, and should therefore be rejected.
Jeffrey_Simpson  African_Canadians  TDSB  identity_politics  Afrocentric  education  schools  dropouts  public_schools  race  achievement_gaps  family_breakdown  dysfunction  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock 
august 2012 by jerryking
Boys without dads
Nov 28, 2005| The Globe and Mail. pg. A.14 | Robert Sciuk.

Finally, someone has had the guts to stand up and speak the truth of the dysfunctional family and the impact that growing up fatherless has upon the children and the teens of both sexes within the black communities (The Many Fatherless Boys In Black Families -- editorial, Nov. 26). While The Globe brings to light the issues, it holds back from stating the obvious fact that our government provides financial incentives to perpetuate the situation.

In Canada, we have strong, state-sponsored financial incentives for unwed teenage mothers to have and to keep their children, even in the absence of a caring nuclear family with which to provide a proper upbringing. Perhaps it's time to adjust the way we help these troubled teens to avoid unwanted conceptions rather than reward them financially for having babies.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  silence  African_Canadians  courage  dysfunction  family  fatherhood  family_breakdown  out-of-wedlock 
november 2011 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Moynihan’s Message - NYTimes.com
May 28, 2010 | NYT | By JAMES T. PATTERSON. FORTY-FIVE years
ago this month, Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan
began quietly circulating a report he had recently completed, “The
Negro Family: The Case for National Action” , about the “tangle of
pathology” — out-of-wedlock births, fatherless households — damaging
low-income black families...."Meanwhile Moynihan’s pessimistic
prophecies have come true. In 1965, a quarter of nonwhite births in the
United States were out of wedlock, eight times the proportion among
whites. Today the proportion of nonmarital births among non-Hispanic
blacks exceeds 72 %, compared with a proportion among non-Hispanic
whites of around 28 %.

Only 38 % of black children now live with married parents, compared with
three-quarters of non-Hispanic white children. Many boys in fatherless
families drop out of school, fail to find living-wage work and turn to
idleness or crime. Many girls become poverty-stricken single mothers
themselves. "
op-ed  African-Americans  race_relations  public_policy  Daniel_Moynihan  poverty  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock  family_breakdown  low-income 
may 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read