recentpopularlog in

jerryking : overflow   2

Don’t blame the flu for ER congestion - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 06 2015,

Our emergency rooms are overflowing because of bad planning and misplaced priorities....Influenza is one of the most common and predictable infectious diseases on Earth. In Canada, it spreads from west to east and peaks at roughly the same time each year, near the end of December or early January.

Just as predictably, hospital ERs are besieged, most notably during the Christmas to New Year’s period.

There is more illness in the winter – not just flu, but gastroenteritis, colds and other pathogens spread by coughing and sneezing in close quarters....The larger issue is that our health system does nothing to anticipate and adjust to these problems. On the contrary, it is irresponsibly inflexible.

During the holiday season, retail outlets extend their hours, add additional staff, stock more supplies, and so on. All sensible stuff – Planning 101, if you will – designed to make life easier for the consumer.

Hospitals, and the health system more generally, do the opposite: During the holiday season, they reduce or close a range of services, from hospital beds to primary care clinics, and funnel patients to jam-packed emergency rooms.
adjustments  André_Picard  anticipating  community_care  congestion  emergency_rooms  flu_outbreaks  pathogens  planning  primary-care  healthcare  home_care  hospitals  inflexibility  influenza  overcapacity  overflow 
january 2015 by jerryking
Water-saving in the north-east: Trees grow in Brooklyn
Nov 11, 2010 | The Economist. NYC has a serious sewer problem,
spilling more than 27 B gal. (102 B L) of untreated overflow into its
harbour each year.U.S cities rely on decrepit sys. that collect
storm-water run-off, industrial waste & human sewage in the same
pipes.Usually these pipes take waste water to treatment plants.But any
overflow is released into rivers & streams.Time, erosion &
increasingly erratic weather have made this a national issue. NYC
recently unveiled a plan to clean up its waterways.Instead of spending
billions on new tanks & pipes (i.e, “grey infrastructure”), which
take yrs. to build & never quite address the problem, NYC will
invest in “green infrastructure”, e.g. roofs covered with vegetation,
porous pavements & kerbside gardens.Instead of treating rainfall as
waste to be quickly whisked away, NYC will let it sink usefully into the
ground: helping to make the city greener, improve air quality, raise
property values, increase jobs & lower water & energy costs,
green_roofs  water  infrastructure  New_York_City  Brooklyn  wastewater-treatment  overflow  environment 
november 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read