recentpopularlog in

jerryking : overreach   9

Six ways to get noticed and get ahead
JUNE 25, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ROY OSING, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

**INVISIBILITY BEGETS IGNORABILITY
Get noticed in a crowd of people all looking to advance themselves. Be competent in your current role, of course, but stand out.....Develop a “be visible” plan that, in a simple and factual way, presents your achievements and what you do day-in and day-out to execute your organization’s strategy.

**VALUE IS THE END GAME
Create value that people care about. The focus must be on the benefits you create for the organization (and for people), .....Realize that the project or task you’ve been given is just the internal vehicle for adding value. Keep your eyes on your contribution to the marketplace within which your organization operates.

**DIFFERENCES MUST DEFINE YOU
Be the only one that does what you do:

* Invent your own problem-solving method using crowd sourcing, or canvassing others;
* Do more of what was asked;
* Do the opposite of what the pundits preach;
* Use trusted external resources for added credibility;
* Launch additional projects from your original task.

** DOING IT IS 10 TIMES BETTER THAN TALKING ABOUT IT
“A little less conversation, a little more action please.” – Elvis Presley

It’s not about intent; it’s about getting stuff done in the trenches where life is messy and people never behave the way you expect them to.

**FIND A ‘DONE IT’ MENTOR
Find a mentor who has done stuff.....plenty of smart people who have achieved less than their potential because they put all their trust in the way things should work – based on theory – as opposed to pouring their energy into finding a way to make them work in the hard realities of people’s biases and internal politics.

My mentors always had the subliminal tag “master crafter in doing stuff” associated with their name.

** BE OPEN TO ANYTHING
Do anything asked of you and do it with eagerness and an open mind. Don't be too picky.... upwardly mobile people are expected to overreach every once in a while, to go for something that is beyond their capability.
action_plans  advice  differentiation  execution  ignorability  implementation  individual_initiative  internal_politics  invisibility  in_the_real_world  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  messiness  movingonup  new_graduates  open_mind  overdeliver  overreach  realities  Roy_Osing  sophisticated  torchbearers  urgency  value_creation 
june 2019 by jerryking
Grand follies and the art of thinking big
February 22, 2019 |Financial Times| by Janan Ganesh.

Who would rather that Airbus had never made the bet at all? Who would live in a world that never risks over-reach?

A defender of grand follies is spoilt for examples that turned out well........Today’s vainglorious travesty is tomorrow’s untouchable fixture of the landscape. We are lousy judges of future tastes, including our own....Even if an audacious project fails, and fails lastingly, it can still trigger success stories of other kinds. Some of this happens through the sheer technical example set: the A380, like Concorde before it, forced engineers to innovate in ways that will cascade down the decades in unpredictable ways. Some of the most banal givens of daily life — dust busters, wireless headsets — can be traced back to that messianic project we know as the space programme.

Then there is the inspiring spectacle of just trying to do something big. Progress through tinkering counts no less than progress through great leaps, but only the second kind is likely to electrify people into venturing their own efforts. Without the grand gesture — and the risk of humiliation — any field of endeavour is liable to stagnate.....Perhaps an exhausted west now prefers to tinker all the same. Big ideas are often paid for out of idle wealth (think of Elon Musk’s fortune, or Alphabet’s cash pile) and the existence of this can seem almost distasteful in a culture that is newly sensitive to inequality. As for largeness of vision, there was plenty of the stuff in the forever wars and pre-crash banking. It would be strange if people who lived through those events did not now flinch at the sight of excitable visionaries brandishing schemes.
Airbus  audacity  big_bets  breakthroughs  Elon_Musk  fallacies_follies  game_changers  humiliation  incrementalism  inspiration  Janan_Ganesh  Jeff_Bezos  marginal_improvements  moonshots  overreach  risks  thinking_big  tinkerers  visionaries 
february 2019 by jerryking
Japan gears up for mega hack of its own citizens
February 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leo Lewis.

Yoshitaka Sakurada, Japan’s 68-year-old minister for cyber security, stands ready to press the button next week on an unprecedented hack of 200m internet enabled devices across Japan — a genuinely imaginative, epically-scaled and highly controversial government cyber attack on homes and businesses designed as an empirical test of the nation’s vulnerability. A new law, fraught with public contention over constitutionally-guaranteed privacy, was passed last May and has just come into effect to give the government the right to perform the hack and make this experiment possible. The scope for government over-reach, say critics, cannot be overstated. Webcams, routers and other devices will be targeted in the attacks, which will primarily establish what proportion have no password protection at all, or one that can be easily guessed. At best, say cyber security experts at FireEye, the experiment could rip through corporate Japan’s complacency and elevate security planning from the IT department to the C-suite.

The experiment, which will run for five years and is being administered through the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, is intended to focus on devices that fall into the broadly-defined category of “internet of things” (IoT) — anything from a yoga mat that informs a smartphone of your contortions, to remotely controlled factory robots. And while cyber experts say IoT security may not be the very top priority in the fight against cyber crime and cyber warfare, they see good reasons why Japan has chosen to make its stand here.....warnings that the rise of IoT will create a vast new front of vulnerability unless the security of, for example, a web-enabled yoga mat is taken as seriously by both manufacturers and users as the security of a banking website. The big cyber security consultancies, along with various governments, have historically relied on a range of gauges to calculate the scale of the problem. The Japanese government’s own National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) uses scans of the dark web to estimate that, of the cyber attacks it detected in 2017, 54 per cent targeted IoT devices.
C-suite  cyberattacks  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  dark_web  experimentation  hacks  Industrial_Internet  Japan  overreach  preparation  privacy  readiness  testing  vulnerabilities  white_hats 
february 2019 by jerryking
Putin Is Waging Information Warfare. Here’s How to Fight Back. - The New York Times
By MARK GALEOTTIDEC. 14, 2016

the United States and its allies should pursue a strategy of deterrence by denial. Mr. Putin shouldn’t fear retaliation for his information warfare — he should fear that he will fail.

There are several ways to go about this. First, United States institutions need better cybersecurity defenses. Political parties and major newspapers are now targets just as much as the power grid and the Pentagon are. The government has to help provide security when it can — but people have a duty to be more vigilant and recognize that their cybersecurity is about protecting the country, not just their own email accounts. ....Finally, Mr. Putin’s own vanity could be turned into a weapon against him. Every time he overreaches, the American government should point it out. Every time he fails, we need to say so loudly and clearly. We should tell jokes about him. He can rewrite the record in Russia, but the West does not have to contribute to his mythmaking — and we should stop building him up by portraying him as a virtual supervillain.
cyberattacks  Vladimir_Putin  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  retaliation  security_&_intelligence  punitive  phishing  deterrence  economic_warfare  blacklists  retribution  disinformation  campaigns  destabilization  Russia  information_warfare  delegitimization  deception  overreach  power_grid 
december 2016 by jerryking
Yes, It's a Tech Bubble. Here's What You Need to Know
SEPTEMBER 2015 ISSUE | | Inc.com | BY JEFF BERCOVICI.

"Investors change priorities. Soon, they may be telling you, 'We want to see profitability at the expense of growth.' So you need to think about the levers you can pull to make that happen." (JCK- How does redirect from a growth mindset and plans to one of profitability?--Scott Kupor)

First, there will be some upside. Sky-high home and office rents in certain cities and neighborhoods will drop, and if you're not in the market yet, you'll have a great buying opportunity. If you're hiring, the drum-tight talent market for anyone with programming skills should loosen up considerably, although big companies may reap the benefits more than small ones, says Oliver Ryan, founder of the tech recruiting firm Lab 8 Ventures. "The 'war' for engineering talent is primarily a supply-and-demand issue, so a widespread pullback of venture capital would likely diminish demand to a point," he says.......a burst bubble could also create new types of adversity. ....suppliers and distribution partners may disappear, your business notwithstanding......money is time, and the best way to ride out a downturn is with a couple of years' worth of cash stashed in your mattress. Just be sure you're prepared to deliver a couple of extra years' worth of growth, because you'll need to if you follow the raise-more-than-you-need plan. "It's not without risk," .... "You'll have to make the numbers to justify your valuation at some point, so you're raising the hurdle on yourself."......To make it over the chasm, you have to show investors traction and momentum--a PowerPoint slide with a line pointing up and to the right. A startup can often manufacture these things by spending enough on advertising and customer acquisition. But the attributes so richly rewarded in the current environment aren't necessarily the same ones that will be selected for once the bubble bursts......In October 2008, Doug Leone of Sequoia Capital gave a famous presentation titled "R.I.P. Good Times," in which he counseled entrepreneurs to squirrel away their nuts for winter and "spend every dollar as if it was your last." In hindsight Leone's forecast, and his warning was seen as alarmist......be more careful about the terms on which you raise money as that "extreme end of a cycle" approaches. Typically, you'll seek the highest possible valuation: (a) It minimizes dilution and generates publicity that attracts talent and clients and even more capital. But as valuations settle--and the inevitable rise of interest rates all but guarantees they will--founders who overreached will struggle to support, or defend, those valuations. In the worst instances, if you finagled an extra 10 or 20 % of paper value by granting investors aggressive downside protections--the "features" and "ratchets" that VCs use to make reckless bets without incurring real risk--you'll find yourself downgraded from owner to employee. "
boom-to-bust  bubbles  downside  economic_cycles  economic_downturn  founders  growth  investors  mindsets  overreach  profitability  priorities  Sequoia  start_ups  Silicon_Valley  silver_linings  upside  vc  venture_capital  war_for_talent 
october 2016 by jerryking
Apple's Second Date with History - WSJ.com
MAY 26, 2010 | WSJ | By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR Whose phone
strategy is smarter in the long run—Apple's or Google's? The dangers of
Google's approach? With so many different Android phones floating around
and with so much openness to the Web, the search giant risks delivering
a crummy, fragmented, even disastrous user experience, with security
leaks, viruses and customer service that fails when needed most. For
Apple, the immediate danger is overreach, undermining its ability to
deliver an ineffably superior user experience that just pleases. Apple
has decided it needs an advertising strategy. It will need a TV
strategy, especially after Google last week announced a version of
Android to bring the cloud cornucopia to the biggest, best screen yet.
Apple may also find it needs a strategy to compete in search. It
certainly will need a strategy to make sure its infotainment offerings
through iTunes don't fall behind in price and variety what Android users
can get through their browsers.
Apple  Steve_Jobs  Google  smartphones  strategy  delighting_customers  strategies  open_source  Holman_Jenkins  overreach 
may 2010 by jerryking
Google Will No Longer Censor Search Results in China - WSJ.com
JANUARY 14, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | Editorial. The uneasy
truce between Google and China broke down yesterday when the company
announced it would no longer censor search results on its domestic
search engine, Google.cn...The most likely outcome is that Google loses
access to an important market, Chinese customers lose access to its
services, and the government loses face....Until a year or so ago,
Chinese censors were skillful at calibrating the level of censorship and
harassment so that both domestic users and international companies were
willing to play by the government's rules. ...But Beijing overreached.
For instance, the Information Warfare Monitor of Canada says Chinese
criminal gangs are carrying out digital breaking and entering around the
world with little opposition from, and perhaps even the support of some
parts of, the government."
Google  calibration  China  censorship  hackers  overreach  information_warfare  gangs  organized_crime 
january 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read