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jerryking : parking   23

GO Transit calls time on free parking
APRIL 6, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE.

It costs up to $40,000 to build one parking spot at a GO train station, and most often, commuters pay nothing to use it. The agency that runs the transit service says this can’t go on......The simplest way to encourage people not to drive to GO stations is to have more of the passengers living nearby. Some of the new stations proposed under the RER plan are in urban areas, with ready-made clientele close at hand. And the area around other stations can densify, making GO more convenient for more people.

“Let’s turn them into active mobility hubs,” said Cherise Burda, the director of the City Building Institute at Ryerson University. “Looking at utilizing the station lands as communities and not just as parking lots, that’s where you’re going to get a lot more ridership.”

Proximity goes only so far, though. Metrolinx stats show that a lot of their passengers are quite close to their station already. Some 13 per cent of them travel less than one kilometre to a GO rail station, and another 19 per cent come between one and two kilometres. But only 18 per cent of passengers arrive by foot, transit or bicycle, meaning that a large number of people are making short drives to the station.

After expanding parking at a breakneck pace for years, Metrolinx is hoping to slash the number of rail passengers who drive alone to the station by 40 per cent. Parking will be discouraged through price, while access to stations for those coming by foot, transit and bike will be improved. Also, more residential density around stations will be encouraged.
GO  terminals  transit  free  parking  Metrolinx  commuting  RER  property_development 
april 2018 by jerryking
Why Mississauga wants to charge for parking
November 18, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE
parking  Mississauga  free 
november 2017 by jerryking
Feeding the parking meter a thing of the past - The Globe and Mail
PETER NOWAK
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
SEPTEMBER 5, 2017
SEPTEMBER 4, 2017

Most cities with similar apps have seen adoption levels in the single digits, according to Ian Maher, vice-president of strategic planning and IT for Toronto Parking Authority, which runs the Green P spaces. Toronto's high acceptance is the result of the Green P app being intuitive and easy to use, as well as a general tech-savviness among drivers, he says. "We have a lot of people who are app crazy."

Developed by Charlotte-based Passport Inc., the app has users enter their parking location's numerical code, which is found on curbside meters. They then select the desired amount of time and the corresponding fee is deducted from the money they load into their account via a credit card. The app sends a notification when time is about to expire and allows for extensions if necessary.

On the enforcement side, officers can look up a licence plate number on a hand-held device to see if a car is paid up, or check a location ID for an overall list of authorized vehicles in a specific area.
parking  Green_P  LBMA  location_based_services  mobile_applications  Toronto  TPA 
september 2017 by jerryking
Robert Bundy: Powerful bureaucrat helped shape Toronto - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 08, 2017

Robert Bundy, the powerful Toronto civil servant who oversaw the expansion of the city’s parking system and parks, eventually meeting his match in the stubborn residents of the harbour islands, died of heart failure on May 8 in Toronto. He was 94.

A property developer who had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was decorated twice by Russia for his role in the Murmansk Run supply convoys, Mr. Bundy moved into public service at a time when city bureaucrats enjoyed substantial clout......Early in their marriage, Mr. Bundy joined the city bureaucracy. His construction business had been successful and “he didn’t have to worry about finances,” his son Brock said. “He really truly believed he was doing something to make everyone’s life better, and you can see that all the way through.”

The elder Mr. Bundy became general manager of Toronto’s parking authority in 1958, a time when creating plentiful and cheap parking was seen as crucial to helping the city compete with the suburbs. A 1968 annual report for the agency shows that in his first 10 years in the role the number of municipal off-street parking spaces nearly doubled to 14,440.

In the late 1950s, he also chaired a committee trying to ensure that sufficient development followed the route of Toronto’s east-west subway line. And he pioneered the concept of a business improvement area, which recruits local merchants to help make their surroundings more attractive and marketable.

The importance of abundant parking, however, remained a passion for years. He was co-founder of what would become the International Parking Institute and travelled to learn from his peers across the continent. Decades later, when he was part of a pitch to redevelop Toronto’s Greenwood Raceway, the proposal was built around extensive new parking.

However, he was cognizant of the needs of non-drivers as well. As Metro’s parks commissioner, he oversaw great swaths of new green space. His family said he was particularly proud of Rosetta McClain Gardens in Scarborough, a park specifically designed around the needs of people with disabilities.

During his tenure, the city created bicycle trails in some of its green spaces, routes that proved so popular they led to friction between cyclists and other users
Toronto  cities  parking  WWII  bureaucrats  parks  obituaries  city_hall  property_development  veterans  leaders  Royal_Navy  BIAs  public_spaces  city_builders  civil_servants  redevelopments  green_spaces 
june 2017 by jerryking
How Technology Will Solve Cities’ Parking Nightmare - The Experts - WSJ
By JASON BORDOFF
Apr 21, 2017

as Prof. Donald Shoup has explained in his book, The High Cost of Free Parking, city officials dramatically underprice public parking relative to its market value, leading people to drive when they might otherwise have taken mass transit, walked, cycled or carpooled. San Francisco in 2010 had nearly 450,000 parking spaces, over half of which were free street spots. Free or low-cost street parking, either metered or permitted for residents, effectively subsidizes driving.

Underpricing parking not only leads to more car use, but also to more driving as people cruise around looking for parking, contributing to pollution, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions. .....The coming revolution in autonomous cars can accelerate this trend. As Uber’s Chief Product Officer Jeff Holden recently explained at Columbia’s Center on Global Energy Policy, displacing the need for drivers will make it far more economical to move about with self-driving shared cars than to own a car—and that does not include the opportunity cost of driving, as riders will be able to use time en route to work, read or sleep.

Technology can also make carpooling far more efficient by better connecting riders going to and from the same place, further reducing cars on the road. Roughly 50% of Uber’s rides in San Francisco and 25% globally are now Uber Pool, according to Mr. Holden. Combining ride sharing with car sharing could cut the number of cars on the road—and that need to be parked—by 80% in major cities such as New York, according to MIT research.

With shared autonomous vehicles, there would be little need to park cars in downtown urban areas. Rather, autonomous vehicles could travel to garages on the outskirts of town to be recharged, cleaned and maintained.
parking  cities  Uber  UberPool  underpricing  ride_sharing  sharing_economy  opportunity_costs  autonomous_vehicles  high-cost 
april 2017 by jerryking
TTC chair looks to boost parking revenue - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015
TTC  pricing  parking 
november 2015 by jerryking
Toronto's new parking app leaves city asking: What took so long? - The Globe and Mail
The dozens of suit-and-tied bureaucrats arrived first for the announcement, branded an “exciting” step forward. The journalists followed, greeted by a young man with a sign-in sheet and…
parking  Toronto  mobile_applications  Green_P 
may 2015 by jerryking
Find Parking in Toronto with Green P.com | Green P Parking's For you. | Toronto Parking Authority
Day /Month/Year
Distance from 6 Lyon Heights to:
CP1 (20 Charles Street, Toronto, ON) - 21.9 Km
CP 12(30 Alvin Avenue, Toronto, ON)St.Clair E./Yonge - 16.9 Km
CP21 (72 Amroth Avenue, Toronto, ON)Danforth/Woodbine - 10.8 Km
CP26(37 Queen St. East, Toronto, ON) Queen/Victoria - 20.2 Km
CP 29 (75 Holly Street, Toronto, ON) Yonge/Eglinton 14.4 Km
CP36(110 Queen St. W,Toronto, ON)Nathan Phillips Sq - 20.7 Km
CP43 (2 Church Street, Toronto, ON) Esplande - 21.6 Km
CP51B (365 Lippincott St., Toronto, ON) Annex Green P - 19.9 Km
CP52 (40 York Street, Toronto, ON) - 21.9 Km
CP78 (35 Erindale Avenue, Toronto, ON) - 17.4 Km
CP79 (405 Sherbourne Street, Toronto, ON) - 17.8 Km
CP84 (9 Salem Avenue, Toronto, ON) Dovercourt/Salsa- 21.8 Km
CP 91B (265 Armadale Avenue, Toronto, ON)Jane/Bloor - 31.7 km
CP111 (74 Clinton Street, Toronto, ON) Little Italy - 26.2 Km
CP 141 (141 Greenlaw Avenue, Toronto, ON) St. Clair/Dufferin 27.6 Km.
CP 150 (40 Larch Street, Toronto, ON) Chinatown - 24.2 Km
CP157 (709 Millwood Road, Toronto, ON)@ Bayview Ave. - 13.5 Km
CP158 (1325 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON)- 26.9 Km
CP 171 (730 Mt. Pleasant Road, Toronto, ON) - 14 Km
CP181B (1155 King Street West, Toronto, ON) - 27.3 Km
CP410 (180 Beecroft Road, Toronto, ON)- 16.9 Km
CP700B (101 Grangeway Avenue, Toronto, ON) - 3.3 Km
CP818 (2444 Lawrence Avenue, Toronto, ON) - 1.7 Km
CP819 (2445 Eglinton Avenue East, Toronto,ON) - 4.1 Km
CP826A (2446 Eglinton Avenue East, Toronto, ON)- 4.1 KM

Metro Hall (200 Wellington St. West #130, Toronto) - 23.8 km
Simcoe Place (207 Wellington St. West, Toronto) - 23.7 Km
Staples Business Depot (3434 Lawrence Avenue East) - 2.8 Km
Staples Business Depot (1980 Eglinton Avenue East) - 5.2 Km
uToronto (130 St. George Street, Tor., ON)Robarts 19.4 Km
UTSC (1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON)- 8.3 Km
=====================================================
3231 Eglinton Ave. East to:

Kennedy Station: 5.2 Km one way
parking  Toronto  search  Green_P  King_Street  Yonge_Street 
december 2012 by jerryking
In Crowded Downtowns, Parking Costs a Premium - WSJ.com
AUGUST 31, 2011 | WSJ | By ROBBIE WHELAN

For Sale: 200 Sq. Feet, 0 BRs, No View: $125k
parking  urban  congestion 
november 2011 by jerryking
How a Las Vegas Megahotel Tries to Seem Smaller - WSJ.com
Sept. 22, 2011 | WSJ | By ANDREA PETERSEN. One key to
megahotels' survival: Increasingly, they are working to counter the
perception that they're crowded, filled with long lines and just too big
to give good service....In the vast parking lot of the nearly year-old
2,995-room Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, for example, electronic signs show
drivers how many spots are available within each level and row. Lights
above each space glow red if occupied, green if free. One Honolulu
giant, the 3,500-room Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Resort, recently
tackled front-desk lines by adding "roaming lobby concierges" to answer
questions and direct some guests to alternative reception desks.

MGM Grand employs strategies at every point, from the parking lot to
check-ins to housekeeping, to make its operations feel small.
Las_Vegas  hotels  customer_experience  digital_signage  personalization  parking  queuing  customer_intimacy  concierge  concierge_services 
september 2011 by jerryking
STRATEGY PERKONOMICS: The customer's always right ... and looking for a perk
Nov. 24, 2008 G&M column by Harvey Schachter looking at customer care plus assorted tips on branding.

some companies are gaining an edge through what it calls "Perkonomics" - adding perks and privileges to the regular offering in order to gain loyalty by satisfying consumers' desire for novel forms of status and/or convenience.

Perkonomics applies across all industries, and even to luxury brands that can search for additional status perks to offer customers. In most cases, the perks are free but in some instances the customer pays for the privilege.

Examples.

Exclusive Perks: American Express cardholders had exclusive access to purchase the winning dress designed on the episode of Project Runway of Sept. 3 - non-Amex customers could not purchase it.

No Queue Perks: Skipping a lineup can be a big time saver and, hence, a major perk. Avis Preferred membership enables car rental customers to skip lines and paperwork and go straight to their car, at more than 1,400 locations worldwide.

Concierge Perks: Amsterdam-based private bank Insinger de Beaufort launched a service aimed at saving its top clients the time and hassle of dealing with the minutiae of their personal finances. The clients are sent a big shoebox by courier every month into which they drop bills to be paid, receipts, tax returns, speeding tickets, insurance documents and the like, which the bank then handles for them.

Assorted Perks: South African health insurance company Discovery has a wellness program called Vitality that offers rewards for a healthy lifestyle based on scientific measurement. Members receive points by decreasing their risk factors for illness, and the higher the points, the greater the access to shopping and travel discounts. Nokia in the Philippines has installed battery-charging stations for phones throughout the Manila subway system, which Nokia owners can use at no cost.

Parking Perks: IKEA stores in Canada feature two Green Parking spaces close to the store reserved for drivers of hybrid cars and fuel-efficient vehicles.
Harvey_Schachter  customer_care  tips  branding  innovation  perks  product_launches  Amex  queuing  parking  customer_loyalty  loyalty_management  exclusivity  concierge_services  quantified_self  IKEA  Green_P  risk_factors 
january 2009 by jerryking

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