recentpopularlog in

jerryking : parks   83

« earlier  
City Parks Piggyback on Infrastructure
Oct. 8, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jane Margolies.

With land scarce, green space is being built into needs like transit hubs and power stations. But the projects come with challenges.....Salesforce Park is a lush landscape that stretches four city blocks atop a transit center in San Francisco. With lawns, hillocks, lavender beds, leafy trees and a walking path, it gives commuters a relaxing place to wait for their bus and attracts people who live and work nearby looking for respite in the middle of a busy city.

Despite its presence as a calming oasis, Salesforce Park faced stressful start-up challenges....Building a park 70 feet in the air atop a transit center showed how complex it can be to piggyback green space on active infrastructure. Such projects require coordination among many consultants and, often, multiple levels of government, with possible construction delays, cost overruns and pushback from residents....still, with land for urban parks scarce and prohibitively expensive, the practice is becoming increasingly common......“It’s a way of making infrastructure do double or even triple duty,” ....Parks add value not only for relaxation, recreation and human health,....but also for combating heat, absorbing storm water and providing habitat for wildlife....an infrastructure project with a park can cost less than two projects undertaken independently, ......“There’s an economy of scale and an efficiency,”....The idea of building parks on infrastructure can be traced to the rails-to-trails movement, which for four decades has transformed abandoned rail corridors into walking and biking paths.......The wildly popular High Line in Manhattan, which opened in 2009, gave impetus to the idea of adding greenery to infrastructure that is raised off the ground.....The High Line is considered a design and tourism triumph, but it has also drawn criticism for accelerating gentrification along its route and not better serving residents of nearby public housing.... adding green space to functioning infrastructure has gained traction.....The vast majority of projects are built on transportation infrastructure, however, including so-called deck parks over highways — adding green space while stitching back together sections of cities that the roadways ripped apart long ago...
economies_of_scale  green_spaces  High_Line  infrastructure  parks  public_spaces  repurposing  Salesforce  San_Francisco  overlay_networks 
october 2019 by jerryking
The Meadoway: 16 km stretch of urban park will connect downtown to Scarborough | CBC News
Posted: Apr 11, 2018 | CBC News | by Ramna Shahzad.

The park will connect 4 ravines, 15 parks and 34 neighbourhoods.

A 16-kilometre long stretch of land slated to be transformed into a large urban park called The Meadoway is "a bold vision," Mayor John Tory said on Wednesday.

The park, which will stretch north from the Don River Ravine in downtown Toronto all the way to Rouge National Urban Park in Scarborough, will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel the entire length without ever leaving the park. .......The city is working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the W. Garfield Weston Foundation to transform a barren power corridor into the green space over the next seven years.

The entire project is expected to cost around $85 million. The W. Garfield Weston Foundation has pledged a total of $25 million to support it over the coming months.

"[The park] serves as another example of what can be accomplished when we work together with public, private and philanthropic partners,"
bicycles  cycling  Don_River  habitats  landscapes  linearity  Meadoway  neighbourhoods  outdoors  parks  philanthropy  public_spaces  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Toronto  TRCA  urban  wilderness  green_spaces 
july 2019 by jerryking
A first-timer’s guide to winter camping in Algonquin Provincial Park - The Globe and Mail
SHUANG SHAN
ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK, ONT.
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 7, 2018
camping  winter  parks  Algonquin_Park  wilderness  outdoors 
february 2018 by jerryking
Robert Bundy: Powerful bureaucrat helped shape Toronto - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 08, 2017

Robert Bundy, the powerful Toronto civil servant who oversaw the expansion of the city’s parking system and parks, eventually meeting his match in the stubborn residents of the harbour islands, died of heart failure on May 8 in Toronto. He was 94.

A property developer who had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was decorated twice by Russia for his role in the Murmansk Run supply convoys, Mr. Bundy moved into public service at a time when city bureaucrats enjoyed substantial clout......Early in their marriage, Mr. Bundy joined the city bureaucracy. His construction business had been successful and “he didn’t have to worry about finances,” his son Brock said. “He really truly believed he was doing something to make everyone’s life better, and you can see that all the way through.”

The elder Mr. Bundy became general manager of Toronto’s parking authority in 1958, a time when creating plentiful and cheap parking was seen as crucial to helping the city compete with the suburbs. A 1968 annual report for the agency shows that in his first 10 years in the role the number of municipal off-street parking spaces nearly doubled to 14,440.

In the late 1950s, he also chaired a committee trying to ensure that sufficient development followed the route of Toronto’s east-west subway line. And he pioneered the concept of a business improvement area, which recruits local merchants to help make their surroundings more attractive and marketable.

The importance of abundant parking, however, remained a passion for years. He was co-founder of what would become the International Parking Institute and travelled to learn from his peers across the continent. Decades later, when he was part of a pitch to redevelop Toronto’s Greenwood Raceway, the proposal was built around extensive new parking.

However, he was cognizant of the needs of non-drivers as well. As Metro’s parks commissioner, he oversaw great swaths of new green space. His family said he was particularly proud of Rosetta McClain Gardens in Scarborough, a park specifically designed around the needs of people with disabilities.

During his tenure, the city created bicycle trails in some of its green spaces, routes that proved so popular they led to friction between cyclists and other users
Toronto  cities  parking  WWII  bureaucrats  parks  obituaries  city_hall  property_development  veterans  leaders  Royal_Navy  BIAs  public_spaces  city_builders  civil_servants  redevelopments  green_spaces 
june 2017 by jerryking
Hey Toronto! Take a walk on the wild side in the city's hidden ravines and parks - Toronto - CBC News
By Alexandra Sienkiewicz, CBC News Posted: May 21, 2017

An Enduring Wilderness: Toronto's Natural Parklands, a new book by photographer Robert Burley, you can discover some of the city's hidden gems — from sunken valleys, tree-lined ravines and unpopulated shorelines. ''''''The book itself is a collection of hundreds of photographs and tributes by some of Toronto's best-known writers, including George Elliott Clarke, Alissa York, Anne Michaels, Michael Mitchell and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson.

In describing the project, Burley quotes Robert Fulford: "The ravines are to Toronto what canals are to Venice, and hills are to San Francisco. They are the heart of the city's emotional geography."
ravines  hidden  Toronto  parks  wilderness  books  Rouge_Park 
may 2017 by jerryking
Mapping Where Torontonians Bike and Run
FEBRUARY 2, 2015 | Torontoist | BY DAVID HAINS

Developers map out the world's most popular spots for walking, jogging, and cycling—and reveal where in this city Torontonians like, and don't like, to get outside and get active.

....the maps show pieces of a larger story. The most popular trails might seem simply like fun places for a run or merely the result of individual choices, but they’re part of a larger context that governs how the city works—how the built and natural environment, a community’s land-use mix, housing affordability, community health options, and other factors affect the way we relate to and use different parts of the city.
affordable_housing  cardiovascular  community_health  correlations  cycling  diabetes  green_spaces  health_outcomes  healthy_lifestyles  land_uses  mapping  neighbourhoods  parks  public_policy  ravines  running  Toronto  self-selection 
january 2017 by jerryking
The top 5 ravines in Toronto
osted by Derek Flack / SEPTEMBER 14, 2014
parks  Toronto  ravines 
november 2016 by jerryking
Leaside Bridge | UrbanToronto
Most direct would be up Pape and continuing under Minton Place
Leaside  Toronto  DRL  transit  bridges  parks  Don_River  ravines 
october 2016 by jerryking
Bringing Toronto’s Don River back from the dead - The Globe and Mail
ROY MACGREGOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 12, 2016

Reclaiming the Don: An Environmental History of Toronto's Don River Valley by Jennifer Bonnell.
parks  Don_River  revitalization  ravines  Toronto  books  restorations  environment 
august 2016 by jerryking
Toronto announces plans for new downtown park above active railway - The Globe and Mail
MAHNOOR YAWAR
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 03, 2016

Toronto plans to build a large-scale downtown park above the railway corridor between Bathurst Street and the Rogers Centre. The Rail Deck Park, spanning 21 acres (8.5 hectares), would harness the open space above the active railway in a bid to connect downtown with the waterfront and counter high-rise development in the densely populated area. ...The proposed park will be modelled after the likes of Chicago’s Millennium Park or the under-construction Hudson Yards in Manhattan, both of which “decked” over active rail corridors.
Toronto  parks  CN  waterfronts  intensification  Rail_Deck_Park  South_Core  railways  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Scarborough Bluffs are rarely seen — but there’s a plan to change that - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 13, 2016

[ M. Jane Fairburn in her 2013 book Along the Shore, a history of Toronto's waterfront]

Conservation officials hope to change all that, making the Bluffs safer and easier to visit. They want to shore up dangerous bits, put in more trails and create habitat for wild animals and fish. A study is already under way, with a first set of options to be presented to the public next month.

It is an exciting project, a once-in-a-century chance to open up the whole of the Scarborough shore to a broader public. It is also a delicate one. Officials face the challenge of giving safe access to the Bluffs without destroying the wild quality that lend them their magic. Some people want them left alone altogether. Others want to see a continuous shoreline trail as you might have in an urban waterfront.
Toronto  Marcus_Gee  Scarborough  history  parks  waterfronts  landmarks  landscapes  ravines  conservation  habitats  wilderness  books  TRCA 
may 2016 by jerryking
Parks Canada seeks to manage free-entry influx in 2017 - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE CHEADLE
OTTAWA — The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2016
parks  anniversaries  free  one-time_events 
may 2016 by jerryking
A superpark hides in Toronto’s Don Valley, waiting to be discovered - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 15, 2016

historian Jennifer L. Bonnell wrote in her 2014 book Reclaiming the Don.

A few small moves would get it in motion. Proponents envision new bike lanes on Bayview Avenue that would make it less terrifying to go there on two wheels. An old rail trestle would become a pedestrian bridge. New bridges, stairs and paths would welcome people from Cabbagetown and from Regent Park, from Corktown and the emerging neighbourhoods in and around the Port Lands.

But in the longer term, the plan would mean combining two rail corridors, both controlled by Metrolinx, reconfiguring the DVP ramp to Bloor-Bayview and removing a city works yard that now sits in the middle of the valley. But governments are budgeting at least $1-billion for roads, water, parks and rail improvements in this zone, including the electrification of GO’s train lines and the Gardiner Expressway rebuild. The river is unruly, prone to powerful floods; a thoughtful, coherent landscape would mitigate the risks for infrastructure and serve the environment of the valley.
books  Brickworks  Cabbagetown  Corktown  design  Don_River  DVP  Evergreen  floodplains  floods  Gardiner_Expressway  GO  green_spaces  history  landscapes  Metrolinx  neighbourhoods  parks  Port_Lands  railways  ravines  regeneration  Regent_Park  small_moves  sustainability  Toronto  undervalued 
april 2016 by jerryking
$25-million project reimagines area under Gardiner with paths, cultural spaces - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 16, 2015| The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

This move, to make a beautiful place out of unused infrastructure, reflects the role of landscape architects in today’s cities. “We realize we’re not going to find new public realm in the conventional places,” Mr. Ryan said. “There are no more Central Parks to be built.”

Instead, the big projects involve reclaiming leftover industrial land or infrastructure – “while the glacier of industry recedes from the downtown,” as Mr. Greenberg said.....The construction and the operation of Under Gardiner reflects an unusual partnership. Built by the public agency Waterfront Toronto and owned by the city, the project will be funded with $25-million from local philanthropists Judy and Wil Matthews. They, and the city, are studying whether the space could be run by a park conservancy, a not-for-profit institution that would work in tandem with the city.....“This area is the new frontier on which the city is growing,” Mr. Greenberg said, “just as old infrastructure becomes available for reuse and reinvention.”
parks  Toronto  public_spaces  Gardiner_Expressway  revitalization  rejuvenation  reinvention  landscapes  philanthropy 
november 2015 by jerryking
Abused ravines are loose thread in urban fabric - The Globe and Mail
JOHN BARBER
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 10, 2002

"There is nothing quite like the ravines anywhere: no other city has so much nature woven through its urban fabric in that way," Robert Fulford wrote in a typical example.

"The ravines are to Toronto what canals are to Venice, hills are to San Francisco and the Thames River is to London. They are the heart of the city's emotional geography, and understanding Toronto requires an understanding of the ravines."

Any serious attempt to understand the ravines would probably include the fact that they are an environmental disaster, hopelessly degraded by generations of neglect, and getting steadily worse despite the green boosterism.

It might also notice that the ravines are not woven through the urban fabric in the least; rather, they are emphatically set apart from it, even suppressed by it. At least the hills in San Francisco make an impression; in Toronto, you can drive over a 100-foot bridge and never know it.

It's also possible that this bizarre dislocation -- two worlds, one right on top of the other, yet almost entirely separate -- might help explain why the ravines are still so abused: They have no constituency.
City_Hall  constituencies  emotional_geography  hidden  iconic  John_Barber  nature  overlay_networks  parks  ravines  Toronto  urban  wilderness 
november 2015 by jerryking
Pan Am Path knits an underworld within Toronto - The Globe and Mail
IAN MERRINGER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 19, 2015
ravines  parks  Toronto 
september 2015 by jerryking
Toronto’s ravine system offers the perfect escape from urban life - The Globe and Mail
JOHN ALLEMANG
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 07, 2015

Books: Toronto’s Ravines and Urban Forests. (http://ravines.to)

Jason Ramsay-Brown is a lifelong Torontonian, and passionate student of Toronto's local history and natural heritage. He is a volunteer on the Todmorden Mills Wildflower Preserve Stewardship Team and the Beechwood Wetland Stewardship Team, as well as caretaker of a Monarch Waystation in Toronto's east end. In addition to the book Toronto's Ravines and Urban Forests, Jason has photographed and written about Toronto's ravines for a variety of publications including NOW magazine and the Toronto Field Naturalists newsletter.
Toronto  books  ravines  parks  Don_River 
september 2015 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
Rouge Park stuck in political battle over environmental protections - The Globe and Mail
DAKSHANA BASCARAMURTY AND ANN HUI
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 13 2015
GTA  parks  Rouge_Park  ravines  politics  environment 
march 2015 by jerryking
Fighting inequality is not a job for Toronto’s new mayor - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 04 2014,

Inequality is a society-wide phenomenon best addressed through national and provincial policy tools – partly taxes, but mostly by fostering equality of opportunity with good public schools and health care.

Besides, a higher minimum wage for Toronto alone would only end up hurting those it is meant to help, leading to fewer hours, less job creation and a shift in employment to the suburbs. It would also drive up the cost of living for those least able to absorb it.

City governments can do their part to mitigate inequality by creating safe neighbourhoods, with parks and recreation facilities, accessible public transit and by providing adequate social housing to those who truly need it. Mr. Tory will have his hands full as it is.
Konrad_Yakabuski  mayoral  Toronto  John_Tory  inequality  policy_tools  equality_of_opportunity  public_schools  public_transit  neighbourhoods  parks  social_housing 
december 2014 by jerryking
The High Line effect: Why cities around the world (including Toronto) are building parks in the sky - The Globe and Mail
DAVE MCGINN
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 01 2014

The final section of the 2.4-kilometre-long park was completed last month, putting the finishing touch on what has become the most successful public-space transformation in the United States, if not the world. The High Line attracts five million visitors a year, making it the second most visited cultural venue in the city. Its financial impact has been similarly massive, attracting $2.2-billion in new economic activity and raising tax revenues by an estimated $980-million over the next two decades.

Now Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Rotterdam, Seoul, Toronto and Mexico City are all hoping to catch some of that magic with their own “parks in the sky.” These projects are redefining our understanding of what a park is, and in the process helping to create a richer, bold new vision of public space.
parks  High_Line  Toronto  Chicago  Philadelphia  Rotterdam  public_spaces 
october 2014 by jerryking
Hazel's legacy: a city of green - The Globe and Mail
JOHN ALLEMANG
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Oct. 09 2004
legacies  Toronto  history  parks  ravines  natural_calamities  Don_River  floods  Hurricane_Hazel 
september 2014 by jerryking
10 quirky things to know about the Don Valley
Posted by Chris Bateman / SEPTEMBER 28, 2014

Reclaiming the Don: An Environmental History of Toronto's Don River Valley
history  Toronto  parks  Don_River  ravines  environment 
september 2014 by jerryking
When it comes to the arts, here’s what Toronto needs in a mayor - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

In their statement, they say they want a Toronto that is ambitious, creative, accessible, forward-thinking, responsive, collaborative and imaginative.

They say the city needs a mayor who has a strategic vision, consensus-building leadership skills and a passion for Toronto; who embodies inclusiveness in all interactions; and who balances the budget.

They also identify five things Toronto needs in order to thrive: a creative and innovative economy, healthy and productive citizens, a vibrant cultural sector, affordable and accessible transportation, and beautiful and connected neighbourhoods and green spaces.
cultural_institutions  art  museums  Toronto  elections  mayoral  ROM  AGO  TIFF  neighbourhoods  parks  public_spaces  forward-thinking  green_spaces 
july 2014 by jerryking
Yes you can (and should) escape Toronto’s concrete jungle. Here's how
Oct. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ROBERT SARNER
Biking through Elora
travel  Ontario  parks  Guelph  things_to_do 
october 2013 by jerryking
How to keep Toronto’s storm sewers from flooding? Bring the rivers back - The Globe and Mail
AMANDA KWAN

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 19 2013

vanishingpoint.ca
floods  Toronto  parks  history  daylighting 
july 2013 by jerryking
How Torontonians can get their hands dirty and improve their own parks
Mar. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | IAN MERRINGER.

The key, he says, is for residents to play a role in day-to-day park life – to organize, and perhaps run, the sorts of events and programs that should be animating their patches of ground.

Four weeks ago, this do-it-yourself model got a big boost when the W. Garfield Weston Foundation announced a grant of $5-million over three years to spur grassroots initiatives improving Toronto parks. The money bolsters an effort that has already been a runaway success. In those two years, the number of organized citizens groups – “Friends of” this or that park – has doubled from 40 to roughly 80.

In an era when all levels of government are pleading poverty and reducing services, Mr. Harvey’s Park People has hit upon a working method of do-it-yourself community activism: engaged volunteers seeking permission to do things on their own. This approach of co-operating with bureaucracy to get results could serve as a model for the future of advocacy in Toronto.
Toronto  parks  DIY  volunteering  community  community_support  activism  engaged_citizenry  bureaucracies  grass-roots 
march 2013 by jerryking
There's Plenty of Other Fish in the Lake
December 18, 1997 | WSJ pg. A20 | by Michael Pearce
fly-fishing  Alaska  trout  salmon  parks 
january 2013 by jerryking
National parks combine conservation, agriculture - The Globe and Mail
JESSICA LEEDER - GLOBAL FOOD REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 15 2011,
agriculture  farming  parks  Toronto  FarmStart  conservation 
october 2012 by jerryking
Glen Stewart revitalization to be revealed - The Globe and Mail
LISA ROCHON
ARCHITECTURE CRITIC— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 29, 2012
Toronto  ravines  parks 
may 2012 by jerryking
Lawn chemicals ban means Toronto’s public spaces are going to seed - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 18, 2012

The ban on lawn chemicals was a triumph of fuzzy-headed environmentalism. Since the town of Hudson, Que., became the first jurisdiction to enact an anti-pesticide bylaw in 1991, scores of municipalities and seven provinces have banned them. You can spray pesticides on the food crops we eat, but not the grass we walk on. You can use certain insecticides to kill cockroaches in your house, but not grubs in your grass.
Marcus_Gee  parks  ravines  gardening  bylaws  environmentalism  weeds 
may 2012 by jerryking
Funding for Rouge Valley national park expected in federal budget - The Globe and Mail
bill curry AND kelly grant
OTTAWA AND TORONTO— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 27, 2012
parks  Toronto  ravines  rivers  Rouge_Park 
march 2012 by jerryking
Parks too important to be left just to city hall
03 Dec 2011| The Globe and Mail pg. A.19. | Marcus Gee. The article says the city should also encourage charitable foundations and private companies to sponsor public parks, especially in low-income neighbourhoods with lots of new immigrants. The Toronto Public Library Foundation, he notes, has raised more than $50-million for libraries. Why not revitalize the low-key Toronto Parks and Trees Foundation and make it a heavy-hitting fundraiser for parks?
parks  Toronto  Marcus_Gee  philanthropy  charities  ProQuest  low-key  city_hall 
january 2012 by jerryking
$20 Million Gift to High Line Park - NYTimes.com
By LISA W. FODERARO
Published: October 26, 2011

Many visitors to the High Line, the popular park that wends above street level on the West Side of Manhattan, stop at its northern terminus and peer wistfully through a chain-link fence at the as-yet unreclaimed half-mile segment to the north. Until this week, the nonprofit conservancy that operates the High Line still needed to raise $85 million to finish the park and maintain it.
Metro Twitter Logo.
Connect With Us on Twitter

Follow @NYTMetro for New York breaking news and headlines.

On Wednesday night, the conservancy took a major step toward that goal when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced a $20 million gift to the High Line from the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation.

The gift, which will help build up the park’s endowment and pay for the design of the last section, is the single largest donation ever made to a New York City park, according to city officials.

It follows two previous donations totaling $15 million to the High Line from Barry Diller, chairman of IAC and Expedia, and his wife, the designer Diane von Furstenberg.
High_Line  philanthropy  Barry_Diller  parks  New_York_City 
october 2011 by jerryking
Beautiful Toronto Islands offer serenity in the city - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 04, 2011
Marcus_Gee  toronto  parks 
october 2011 by jerryking
The gym comes to the park « Spacing Magazine
Issue 14: Spring-Summer 2009 /// Infrastructure Fetish
The gym comes to the park
By MIke Bulko
calisthenics  exercise  fitness  functional_strength  gyms  outdoors  parks  Toronto 
august 2011 by jerryking
Sherbourne Common: Clean, green, brainy and blue - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 29, 2011 |G&M|LISA ROCHON. With Sherbourne Common, the
mandate was to heal a neglected part of the waterfront by providing a
neighbourhood-wide water-treatment facility immediately below the park’s
surface...Invisible to the eye, located below the public washrooms, are
the brains of the sewage-treatment facility: a series of disinfecting
machines that use UV light – not the chlorine of yesteryear – to clean
water from the lake and the run-off of surrounding roads, highways &
bldgs. In North America, where dirty water tainted with E. coli
bacteria can be found flowing like nasty rivers into our lakes, this
cleaning process is a rare phenomenon....Without $27-M in funding from
the federal govt., Sherbourne Common would have never happened – and
Toronto would be without a new public asset on previously underused
lands...Sherbourne Common will earn dividends in enhanced tourism for
Toronto, invigorate neighbourhood economies, and rebrand the city as a
place with an intelligent future.
parks  Toronto  green  sewage  wastewater-treatment  bacteria  E._coli 
august 2011 by jerryking
Taylor Creek Park: A ribbon of otherness - The Globe and Mail
MASSIMO COMMANDUCCI
Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010

Running from Dawes Road in the east, just north of Danforth Avenue, to the Don River in the west, the park is an almost-four-kilometre-long stretch of semi-wilderness, part of the disconnected ravine system in the city's east end. Take away a golf course here, a roadway there, and the park would easily link Scarborough's Warden Woods and E.T. Seton Park on the other side of the Don Valley Parkway.

Like those two ravines, Taylor Creek Park follows the path of a river. Taylor-Massey Creek, named after two prominent Toronto families, starts near Highway 401 and runs south along an undignified, concrete-lined course through Scarborough, picking up all kinds of debris and pollutants along the way. But at least it resembles a creek again by the time it reaches the park, bending this way and that, creating pools and eddies for the resident crawfish and ducks.

Unlike a traditional city green space such as High Park, with its formal borders, restaurant, concrete-lined pond and even a zoo, Taylor Creek Park is a wonderfully vague, meandering affair. In some places, homes and buildings loom directly above the ravine - it's often hard to know where the park ends and private property begins; in others, the greenery stretches north and south for hundreds of metres, elbowing its way through the city.

The marshes that line both sides of the creek are stuffed with cattails and willow trees and are home to dragonflies and red-winged blackbirds that complain loudly when joggers or cyclists get too close to their nests. In the eighties, many of the marshes were drained to control mosquitoes and to prevent the flooding of picnic areas and the park's sole paved path; fortunately, the city parks department now follows a policy of naturalization - a combination of habitat restoration and benign neglect - and the wetlands are back.
Don_River  green_spaces  habitats  parks  rivers  ravines  Toronto  wetlands  wilderness 
july 2011 by jerryking
Canoeing the Rouge River: Part two - The Globe and Mail
IAN MERRINGER
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 10
ravines  parks  Toronto  rivers  Rouge_Park 
july 2011 by jerryking
A river’s-edge view of Canada’s newest national park - The Globe and Mail
Ian Merringer
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Jul. 08, 2011

Rouge Park is both huge and under-serviced, a vast suburban wilderness
that spans three municipalities yet has no visitor centre, no canoe
rentals and only one washroom. That could all change with last month’s
announcement in the Throne Speech of a national park designation. The
increase in funding, facilities and visitors that will come with the
designation will mean changes for the park, and perhaps the cities that
surround it.
parks  ravines  Toronto  rivers  Rouge_Park 
july 2011 by jerryking
High Line
April 2011 | National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com |
web_video  parks  New_York_City  High_Line 
may 2011 by jerryking
Miracle Above Manhattan
April 2011 | National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com | By Paul
Goldberger. New Yorkers can float over busy streets in an innovative
park.
parks  New_York_City  things_to_do  High_Line  Manhattan 
may 2011 by jerryking
No cottage? No problem: what to do in Toronto on the May holiday weekend - The Globe and Mail
May. 21, 2011 | Globe & Mail | IAN MERRINGER.
* The Martin Goodman Trail.
* Run up and down the Casa Loma steps, great workout, better view.
* Ravines. No shortage of them.
* Scarborough Bluffs.
* The Don Valley. Again, might want a snack and water.
* Wander around "Chinatown" (Spadina).
* Kensington Market.
* Harbourfront.
travel  things_to_do  ravines  parks  Toronto  Kensington_Market  Chinatown  Harbourfront  Don_River  Scarborough  waterfronts 
may 2011 by jerryking
Bringing the High Line Back to Earth - NYTimes.com
By WITOLD RYBCZYNSKI
Published: May 14, 2011
The High Line may have become a fashionable distraction for out-of-town
visitors, it succeeds because it offers a green outlet to its many
neighbors, who, like Parisians, live in small apartments. In no other
American city do residents rely so much on communal green space, rather
than backyards, for relaxation....American cities are always looking for
quick fixes to revive their moribund downtowns. Sadly, the dismal
record of failed urban design strategies is long: downtown shopping
malls, pedestrianized streets, underground passages, skyways, monorails,
festival marketplaces, downtown stadiums — and that most elusive fix of
all, iconic cultural buildings. It appears likely that we will soon be
adding elevated parks to the list.
New_York_City  sightseeing  things_to_do  urban  parks  High_Line  Manhattan  revitalization  public_spaces  green_spaces 
may 2011 by jerryking
Tories pledge to create national park in Rouge Valley
Apr. 08, 2011 | Globe and Mail | TAMARA BALUJA. The
Conservatives have pledged to create a national park right in the
backyard of the country’s largest metropolis. The promise unveiled on
Friday in the party’s election platform would protect the Rouge Valley,
11,500 acres of Canada’s unique Carolinian forestland teeming with
vulnerable wildlife on the eastern edge of Toronto....A relatively
unknown park, the Rouge does not command the same popularity as the
Toronto Islands or High Park. But Scarborough councillor Glenn De
Baeremaeker called Rouge Valley a “hidden treasure” famous for bald
eagles, bluebirds, salamander, river otters and even an occasional black
bear...Stretching from Lake Ontario to the Oak Ridges Moraine and
Pickering, the area is currently overseen by several municipalities,
including Markham, Toronto, Whitchurch-Stouffville and Richmond Hill.
That creates some logistical difficulties.
Conservative_Party  elections  forestry  hidden  Lake_Ontario  parks  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Southern_Ontario  Toronto  waterfronts  wildlife 
april 2011 by jerryking
Happy Trails
Jul 3, 2004 |G & M | by Melanie Coulson. Taylor
Creek/Sunnybrook Park: 9.4 km from Victoria Pk. to the back of
Sunnybrook Hospital on Bayview Avenue. Starting at Victoria Park Ave.,
this route winds its way through a few smaller parks and meets up with
the massive Sunnybrook Park. It can be picked up throughout Sunnybrook
and at various spots along Taylor Creek.
Terrain: Asphalt - mostly bike/pedestrian paths, with some car traffic
in Sunnybrook Park. Parking/transit Parking at Sunnybrook, with a few
lots along Taylor Creek. The 11 and 124 buses go along Bayview to
Sunnybrook Hospital - pick up the trail behind it, at the bottom of the
hill. . Pros & Cons Good: Relatively flat, with only smaller hills
(except the massive beast at the hospital - there is parking at the
bottom for those not up to the long, windy climb). Restrooms throughout.
Not-so-good: There are a few isolated spots and the route is not well
lit, so really not an option at night.
ProQuest  running  Toronto  ravines  best_of  sightseeing  things_to_do  parks  Don_River 
april 2011 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read