recentpopularlog in

jerryking : passions   61

Opinion | Talk Less. Listen More. Here’s How. -
Jan. 9, 2020 | The New York Times |

* By Kate Murphy, is the author of “You’re Not Listening: What You’re Missing and Why It Matters.”

Listening can be more valuable than speaking. Wars have been fought, fortunes lost and friendships wrecked for lack of listening. It is only by listening that we engage, understand, empathize, cooperate and develop as human beings. It is fundamental to any successful relationship — personal, professional and political.....The sad truth is that people have more experience being cut off, ignored and misunderstood than heard to their satisfaction.....listening goes beyond simply hearing what people say. It also involves paying attention to how they say it and what they do while they are saying it, in what context, and how what they say resonates within you......It’s not about merely holding your peace while someone else holds forth. Quite the opposite. A lot of listening has to do with how you respond — the degree to which you facilitate the clear expression of another person’s thoughts and, in the process, crystallize your own.......Good listeners ask good questions......anyone can be interesting if you ask the right questions......ask truly curious questions that don’t have the hidden agenda of fixing, saving, advising, convincing or correcting. Curious questions don’t begin with “Wouldn’t you agree…?” or “Don’t you think…?” and they definitely don’t end with “right?” The idea is to explore the other person’s point of view, not sway it..........Avoid leading questions like, “Do you shop late a night because you didn’t get around to it during the day?” or “Do you shop at night because that’s when they restock the shelves?” Instead, she turned her question into an invitation: “Tell me about the last time you went grocery shopping late at night.” 
In social situations, avoid peppering people with judgmental, personal or appraising questions--questions that rank the other party in a social hierarchy.........Instead, ask about people about their interests. Try to find out what excites or aggravates them — their daily pleasures or what keeps them up at night [JCK: passions??] ..... ..........Because our brains can think a lot faster than people can talk, beware of the tendency to take mental side trips when you should be listening. Smart people are particularly apt to get distracted by their own galloping thoughts. They are also more likely to assume they already know what the other person is going to say..........The reward of good listening will almost certainly be more interesting conversations........it’s human nature to return courtesies .......listening to other people makes it more likely other people will listen to you.........Listening is a skill. And as with any skill, it degrades if you don’t do it enough.......each of us can become a better listener with practice. The more people you listen to, the more aspects of humanity you will recognize, and the better your instincts will be. Listening well can help you understand other people’s attitudes and motivations, which is essential in building cooperative and productive relationships, as well as discerning which relationships you’d be better off avoiding.......listening poorly, selectively or not at all limits your understanding of the world and prevents you from becoming the best you can be.
 books  Communicating_&_Connecting  contextual  conversations  courtesies  dining  family  independent_viewpoints  listening  passions  pay_attention  questions  relationships  skills  smart_people  social_hierarchy  tips 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Private Libraries That Inspire
April 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Katy McLaughlin.

Difficult to build and maintain, these elaborate spaces contain the passions and obsessions of their owners. Libraries That Inspire -- These spectacular rooms house the owners’ collections of books, antiques, art and ephemera representing their unique, life-long passions and interests.

Forget the Dewey Decimal System: Entrepreneur and inventor Jay Walker’s 25,000 books, manuscripts, artifacts and objects are organized in his personal 3,600-square-foot library “randomly, by color and height,” he said. When he walks into his library, part of his Ridgefield, Conn., home, the room automatically “wakes up,” glowing with theatrical lighting, music and LED-lit glass panels lining various walkways. He finds items to peruse by a system of memory, chance, and inspiration, he said.

The Walker Library of the History of the Human Imagination is a dramatic example of the rarest of residential amenities: A vast, personal, custom-built repository of intellectual stimuli. In the age of the e-reader, it is a status symbol on par with wearing a Patek Philippe watch when the cellphone already tells the time. For wealthy homeowners, personal libraries provide both a quiet refuge from the world and a playground for their minds—as well as a solution to the challenge of warehousing books from which they cannot bear to part......To create enough shelf space and to counteract the visual heaviness of walls lined with books, private libraries may aim for two or more open stories......The private library is a classic example of a highly personal amenity that is expensive for the builder of a dream home to create and hard to recoup upon resale. .......the library has stimulated new ideas that have translated into an array of inventions and helped him make many new friends.

For some private library owners, especially those who aspire to world-class book collections, the serious expenditure isn’t in the physical structure, but in the contents. “It is not uncommon for collectors at this level to be spending in excess of $1 million a year” on books ......
antiques  antiquities  art  bespoke  books  collectibles  collectors  curation  design  high_net_worth  ideas  inspiration  insurance  Katy_McLaughlin  life_long_learning  personal_libraries  physical_place  owners  passions  shelf_space  status_symbols  uniqueness 
april 2019 by jerryking
5 Ways to Value Your Collection, Whether It’s Fine Wine or Shrunken Heads
March 1, 2019 | The New York Times | By Paul Sullivan.

Collectible assets include wine, spirits, coins, trading cards as well as more unusual items, like lighters, belt buckles and even shrunken heads. These collections cost money and time to assemble and certainly have a value to their owners, but can they be considered legitimate investments? That depends on the market.

For many collectors, the only option to buy, sell or even value these assets is through online auction platforms like eBay or enthusiast sites, but for others, their possessions are treated as fine art.......the market for collectibles, which are often valued in the millions of dollars, may not always be so easy to weather. It can experience sudden surges that put desired items out of the reach of true collectors or it can collapse, wiping out the gains speculators thought they had made.

In an economic slowdown, how these investments are treated depends on supply and demand as well as unpredictable forces like fashion and popularity.....Collectibles can be broken into categories determined by provenance, rarity and even a moment in time. Here are five issues to consider when weighing the investment potential of your collection.....
(1) The standouts in the crowd - Leading the pack are high-quality items that have broad name recognition.
(2) High risk, high reward -
(3) Not all collectibles are investments- jewelry is not an investment....because the market is driven too much by changing fashion.
(4) Obscure and difficult to sell - establish the value of esoteric collections by using third-party appraisers. But insurance companies like A.I.G. value these collections by their replacement value, not by the price someone would pay for them.
(5) A market downturn - =hether it’s shrunken heads, 1,000 bottles of wine or sheets of trading cards, a ready buyer may not be available — or may want to pay much less (i.e. a step change in the valuation).
collectibles  collectors  high-risk  howto  obscure  valuations  AIG  auctions  assets  brands  eBay  economic_downturn  esoteric  fine_arts  high-end  high-quality  investing  investments  passions  step_change  unpredictability  wine  whisky  online_auctions 
march 2019 by jerryking
Writing the Script for Your Next Act - The New York Times
By CLAUDIA DREIFUS AUG. 4, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
passions  Second_Acts  retirement 
august 2017 by jerryking
Self-Driving People, Enabled by Airbnb
JULY 26, 2017 | The New York Times | Thomas L. Friedman.

Airbnb has a different goal: enabling what I call self-driving people.

And that’s why I won’t be surprised if in five years Airbnb is not only still the world’s biggest home rental service, but also one of the world’s biggest jobs platforms. You read that right. Very quietly Airbnb has been expanding its trust platform beyond enabling people to rent their spare rooms to allowing them to translate their passions into professions, and thereby empower more self-driving people.....To see what’s growing, go to Airbnb’s site and click not on “homes” but on “experiences.” You’ll find an endless smorgasbord of people turning their passion into profit and their inner artisan into second careers....Airbnb’s “experiences” site has grown tenfold this year.

Tourists visiting a foreign country try to understand the culture by going to a museum and viewing “art by dead people,” noted Chesky. “Why not learn how to make art yourself, taught by a living artist in that culture and immerse yourself in the artist’s world? These are experiences you can bring back with you!”

Chesky believes that the potential for Airbnb experiences could be bigger than home-sharing. ....“The biggest asset in people’s lives is not their home, but their time and potential — and we can unlock that,” he explained. “We have these homes that are not used, and we have these talents that are not used. Instead of asking what new infrastructure we need to build, why don’t we look at what passions we can unlock? We can unlock so much economic activity, and this will unlock millions of entrepreneurs.”...In America, though, there is a surplus of fear and a poverty of imagination in the national jobs discussion today — because “all we are focusing on are the things that are going away,” said Chesky. “We need to focus on what’s coming. Do we really think we’re living in the first era in history where nothing will ever again be created by humans for humans, only by machines? Of course not. It’s that we’re not talking about all of these human stories.”....Indeed, the beauty of this era is that you don’t need to wait for Ford to come to your town with a 25,000-person auto factory. Anyway, that factory is now 2,500 robots and 1,000 people. The future belongs to communities that learn to leverage their unique attributes, artisans and human talent.

There is no Eiffel Tower in Louisville, Ky., but there are amazing bourbon distilleries popping up all over, creating myriad tourist opportunities; there are no pyramids in Detroit, but there is a bountiful history of Motown music and all kinds of artists now creating boutique concerts and tours for visitors to experience it.....We have to do 50 things right to recreate that broad middle class of the ’50s and ’60s, and platforms like Airbnb’s are just one of them. (Having universal health care to create a safety net under all of these budding entrepreneurs would be another.) But you have to be inspired by how many people are now finding joy and income by mining their passions.

100
COMMENTS
“A tourist is someone who does things that locals who live there never do,” said Chesky. Airbnb’s experiences platform is now enabling visitors to live like locals — even though they’re guests and, in the process, enrich the local community and create new employment. Any town can play.

So much of what companies did in the past, concluded Chesky, “was unlocking natural resources to build the stuff we wanted.” Today’s new platforms are unlocking human potential to “be the people we wanted.”

....
Airbnb  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  capitalization  entrepreneurship  experiential_marketing  gig_economy  human_potential  intrinsically_motivated  job_creation  middle_class  passions  platforms  self-actualization  self-starters  Tom_Friedman  tourism  unimaginative 
july 2017 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
Post navigation
PREVIOUS POST
By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
Inside the mind of a venture capitalist | McKinsey & Company
August 2016 | McK | Steve Jurvetson is a partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Michael Chui,
(1) entrepreneurs who have infectious enthusiasm.
(2) sector of the economy believed to be experiencing rapid growth/ massive disruptive change.
(3) wide range of industries, from synthetic biology to rockets to electric cars to a variety of sectors that weren’t ripe for venture investment in prior decades but now are becoming software businesses.
(4) attributes and people somewhat similar to what I look for in the team at work: enough self-confidence to be humble about what it’s proposing and respect for the team over individuals
How should large companies respond? The large companies that are most exciting to me are the ones that innovate outside their core. big companies need to innovate outside their core businesses. The biggest start-up: Space.
Steve_Jurvetson  McKinsey  DFJ  venture_capital  vc  disruption  space  large_companies  software  core_businesses  Moore's_Law  machine_learning  passions  Elon_Musk  accelerated_lifecycles  space_travel  innovation  self-confidence  high-growth  humility  teams 
august 2016 by jerryking
9 Affirmations the Most Successful People Repeat Each and Every Day | Inc.com
1. "I treat others the way they want to be treated."
2. "I am ever grateful." Gratitude allows happiness to come into my life. I define and talk about the things I am grateful for on a daily basis. I know that the No. 1 way for me to be happy is to choose to be grateful.
3. "I am accountable." I am reliable. I am responsible. I never blame others. I never make excuses. I take ownership of my successes as well as my mistakes. I know that my own performance is a direct result of what I think and the actions I take.
4. "I believe in myself." When I fail, I learn. My failures are temporary because my perseverance is permanent. I push forward at all times because I know I can succeed. As I continually believe in myself, my confidence increases.
5. "I have high standards." I do not let mediocrity enter my life. I am honest. I do not apologize for striving for excellence. My quality of life is a reflection of my high standards. By living up to my personal high standards, my confidence increases.
6. "I follow my heart." Time is precious, and everyone has something that they are passionate about. (jk: mybestlife) The cost of not following my heart is too great, I am going to live life with no regrets. As I follow my heart, my confidence increases.
7. "I trust my gut." I value my intuition, since it is based on my subconscious mind and conscious mind working in harmony. I know what is true, and I know what I want to be true. I trust my gut feelings, my inner voice. As I trust myself, my confidence increases.
8. "I am resilient." I have overcome many challenges and will overcome many more. The times that are the toughest are the times I learn the most. I never back down. I work hard and I push through. As I act in a resilient manner, my confidence increases.
9. "I help people." I matter because I make a difference. While I may get tired, I am not weary. I share myself and love to serve. By making a difference, my confidence increases.

If we tell ourselves our personal truth enough, it manifests into reality. Our reality and our actions will always match the story we believe.
affirmations  Jeff_Haden  mybestlife  gratitude  accountability  resilience  mediocrity  high-standards  next_play  gut_feelings  serving_others  passions  no_regrets  inner-directed  it's_up_to_me 
april 2016 by jerryking
Thane Stenner: Here’s where the wealthy get their investment ‘edge’
Mar. 02, 2016 | The Globe and Mail | THANE STENNER.

They have clear investment goals: High-net-worth individuals are obsessive goal setters. They always know why they’re investing (beyond “to make money”). They reverse-engineer their return objectives to meet both long- and short-term goals.

They know when to delegate: High-net-worth investors are not “do-it-yourself” investors.

They think risk first: High-net-worth individuals are generally focused on wealth protection as much as wealth generation.

It’s business: In general, high-net-worth investors tend to be good at “segregating” their emotions from their investment decisions.

They keep the news in perspective: Most wealthy individuals are news junkies. Of course they listen to, digest, and consider a lot of financial news. But the focus of their attention is on long-term trends, not necessarily up-to-the-minute financial data. And they think very, very carefully before making any decision based on news.

They seize the opportunity in crisis: Most high-net-worth individuals are born contrarians.
high_net_worth  slight_edge  investing  investors  rules_of_the_game  Thane_Stenner  goal-setting  contrarians  reverse_engineering  wealth_protection  kairos  impact_investing  passions  passion_investing  calm  Carpe_diem  Michael_McDerment  thinking_deliberatively  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
march 2016 by jerryking
Schwarzman Scholars Announces Inaugural Class to Study in China - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY JAN. 10, 2016

On Monday, the program will announce the first 111 scholarship winners. Mr. Schwarzman, chairman and co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the private equity and investment giant, started the program with a goal of identifying, as he put it, “your best guess as future leaders of the world.”

Some of the recipients, selected from a pool of 3,000 applicants, already seem well on their way.

Lt. Daniel Glenn, 28, is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy. He did his scholarship interview via Skype from a secret location in Iraq, where he is the officer in charge of a Navy special operations platoon that defuses bombs and underwater explosives. Lieutenant Glenn has also founded two philanthropic organizations, and he broke a Guinness World Record for running a mile in an 80-pound bomb suit (8 minutes and 30 seconds). He told his interviewers that he intended to eventually run for the Senate.

Other winners include Rugsit Kanan, 22, a Harvard student from Thailand who writes poetry in English, Thai and Mandarin and plays on the Thai national chess team; Wang Zhe, 26, an economics major from Tsinghua University who was secretary of the Communist Youth League at the school of architecture and taught math and science in Kenya; and Jacob Gaba, 22, a computer science major at Dartmouth College who made a video of himself called “Guy Dances Across China in 100 Days” that went viral.

At his Manhattan office on Thursday, Mr. Schwarzman said that he had modeled his fully funded master’s program on the Rhodes scholarship, but that his was “global with a bit of a U.S. twist.”

His goal is to establish a $450 million endowment that would fund up to 200 students every year: 45 percent from the United States, 20 percent from China and 35 percent from other countries.
financiers  moguls  passions  China  Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Stephen_Schwarzman  scholarships  Rhodes  Tsinghua  philanthropy 
january 2016 by jerryking
Control Your Passions
"A man who governs his passions is master of the world. We must either command them or be enslaved by them. It is better to be a hammer than an anvil."

--St. Dominic Guzman
self-discipline  passions  quotes  jck 
november 2015 by jerryking
How Can Big Food Compete Against Fresher Rivals? - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO
Updated July 12, 2015 1

it is a two-part problem. No. 1, the consumer and competitive marketplace is definitely shifting. For example, quality has evolved beyond just good ingredients, preparation and packaging. Basic quality is a given now; many consumers are looking for something extra: less mass-produced, natural, local.

No. 2, iconic food companies and their mature brands are not responding effectively. Large, established food companies and their brands are being managed as portfolios of revenue and profit streams with a short-term financial orientation, and not as companies that produce food products. Small companies, on the other hand, are being created and managed by people with a food orientation and passion.
CPG  Kraft  emotional_connections  Nestlé  Coca-Cola  food  Pepsi  Big_Food  trends  Kellogg  passions  gourmet  foodies  decreasing_returns_to_scale  shifting_tastes  small_business  SMB 
july 2015 by jerryking
The greatest piece of career advice you will ever get - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MCALLISTER, MIKE MARRINER AND NATHAN GEBHARD
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 08, 2015
advice  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  passions 
june 2015 by jerryking
How to Leave a Mark - NYTimes.com
JAN. 27, 2015 | NYT |David Brooks.

Impact investors seek out companies that are intentionally designed both to make a profit and provide a measurable and accountable social good. Impact funds are frequently willing to accept lower financial returns for the sake of doing good — say a 7 percent annual return compared with an 11 percent return. But some impact investors are seeking to deliver market-rate returns....It’s hard to find a reliable way to measure the social impact of these dual-purpose companies. Impact investors have also had trouble finding scalable deals to invest in. It costs as much to do due diligence on a $250 million deal as on a $25 million deal, so many firms would rather skip the small stuff... impact investing is now entering the mainstream. An older generation used their (rigorous) business mind in one setting and then their (often sloppy) charity mind in another. Today more people want to blend these minds. Typically a big client, or a young heir, will go to his or her investments adviser and say, “I want some socially useful investments in my portfolio.”...Impact investing is not going to replace government or be a panacea, but it’s one of a number of new tools to address social problems. If you want to leave a mark on the world but are unsure of how to do it, I’d say take a look. If you’re a high-net-worth individual (a rich person), ask your adviser to get you involved. If you’re young and searching, get some finance and operational skills and then find a way to get involved in a socially useful investment proposition. If you’ve got a business mind, there are huge opportunities to build the infrastructure (creating measuring systems, connecting investors with deals).
David_Brooks  capitalism  impact_investing  hard_to_find  Michael_McDerment  high_net_worth  new_graduates  skills  passions  passion_investing  TBL  social_impact  measurements  high-impact  heirs 
january 2015 by jerryking
Bob McCown hits sports broadcast milestones and is still going strong - The Globe and Mail
COURTNEY SHEA
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 28 2014,

Over the past few years, friends were always saying to me that I should be “expanding my brand.” I didn’t really think much of it at first, but then about three years ago I made a list of other sorts of projects that I might be interested in getting involved in. I picked my two favourites, which were to form my own production company and to own a winery. I did both of those things, launching Fadoo Productions and buying Stoney Ridge Winery. Both have been going even better than I could have predicted. The production company recently shot the new Rush concert video which went to No. 1 on Billboard the first week it was out. It’s funny because the whole reason for starting these projects was to see if the value of this brand I had created could translate to ventures outside of broadcasting, but what I didn’t realize was how being part of new projects would contribute to my existing work.
passions  passion_investing  personal_branding  product_launches  radio  sports  broadcasting  vineyards  sportscasting 
september 2014 by jerryking
The Art of Focus
June 2, 2014 | - NYTimes.com | David Brooks.

The way to discover a terrifying longing is to liberate yourself from the self-censoring labels you began to tell yourself over the course of your mis-education. These formulas are stultifying, Phillips argues: “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself. Because the point of knowing oneself is to contain one’s anxieties about appetite.”[JCK: anti the valorization of self-awareness??]

Thus: Focus on the external objects of fascination, not on who you think you are. Find people with overlapping obsessions. Don’t structure your encounters with them the way people do today, through brainstorming sessions (those don’t work) or through conferences with projection screens.

Instead look at the way children learn in groups. They make discoveries alone, but bring their treasures to the group. Then the group crowds around and hashes it out. In conversation, conflict, confusion and uncertainty can be metabolized and digested through somebody else. If the group sets a specific problem for itself, and then sets a tight deadline to come up with answers, the free digression of conversation will provide occasions in which people are surprised by their own minds.
children  constraints  curiosity  David_Brooks  fascination  focus  howto  metabolism  mis-education  passions  self-awareness  self-censorship  self-discovery  sustained_inquiry  uncertainty  unknowns 
june 2014 by jerryking
If I was...setting out to be an entrepreneur - FT.com
January 15, 2014 | FT | By Daniel Isenberg.

“Worthless Impossible and Stupid: How Contrarian Entrepreneurs Create and Capture Extraordinary Value”.

...If I were setting out as an entrepreneur today, I would buy an existing company to scale up rather than build a start-up from scratch. I would make incremental tweaks of improvement rather than innovate, exercise cool judgment rather than hot passion and build my departure plan from day one...a lot of great businesses, such as PayPal [the online payments system] and Kaspersky [the internet security company] are carved out of, or combined from, existing assets, or are family businesses taken sky-high by the second or third generation...Rather than start a new company, I would buy a rusty old business to fix up and grow as fast as I could. I want a discarded company that is undervalued but can be dusted off, refurbished with vision and talent, and scaled up. I would be talking to venture capitalists....I know that proprietary technology is not a market maker by itself. Great marketing and management almost always trump big innovation.

Minnovation – small tweaks on existing products – is what moves the ball of economic growth forward. Neither Facebook nor Google, for example, were technology pioneers.

Big innovations are few and far between and are often the stuff of large companies with long patience and deep pockets....Next, I would drain my venture of passion and replace it with commitment, hard work and realistic and relentless self-assessment....start with a stark test of harsh neon lights, exposing every flaw and crack long before the market does so that I can fix them before the customers vote with their feet....plan one's passionless departure from the start, creating a platform to allow the talented people and partners I hire to outperform me very soon.
entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  rules_of_the_game  unglamorous  books  Daniel_Isenberg  advice  howto  passions  exits  lessons_learned  turnarounds  contrarians  scaling  minnovation  undervalued  under-performing  carveouts  family_business  proprietary  incrementalism  self-assessment  customer_risk  breakthroughs  large_companies  vision  refurbished  spin-offs  hard_work  dispassion  marketing  management  commitments  marginal_improvements  unsentimental  outperformance 
january 2014 by jerryking
Cal Newport -- Author: So Good They Can't Ignore You, How to Be a High School Superstar, How to Become a Straight-A Student, How to Win at College
Cal Newport debunks the long-held belief that “follow your passion” is good advice. Not only is the cliche flawed—preexisting passions are rare and have little to do with how most people end up loving their work—but it can also be dangerous, leading to anxiety and chronic job hopping.

After making his case against passion, Newport sets out on a quest to discover the reality of how people end up loving what they do. Spending time with organic farmers, venture capitalists, screenwriters, freelance computer programmers, and others who admitted to deriving great satisfaction from their work, Newport uncovers the strategies they used and the pitfalls they avoided in developing their compelling careers.

Matching your job to a preexisting passion does not matter, he reveals. Passion comes after you put in the hard work to become excellent at something valuable, not before. In other words, what you do for a living is much less important than how you do it.

With a title taken from the comedian Steve Martin, who once said his advice for aspiring entertainers was to “be so good they can’t ignore you,” Cal Newport’s clearly written manifesto is mandatory reading for anyone fretting about what to do with their life, or frustrated by their current job situation and eager to find a fresh new way to take control of their livelihood. He provides an evidence-based blueprint for creating work you love.

So Good They Can’t Ignore You will change the way we think about our careers, happiness, and the crafting of a remarkable life.

Praise

“Stop worrying about what you feel like doing (and what the world owes you) and instead, start creating something meaningful and then give it to the world. Cal really delivers with this one.”
—Seth Godin, author, Linchpin

“Entrepreneurial professionals must develop a competitive advantage by building valuable skills. This book offers advice based on research and reality–not meaningless platitudes– on how to invest in yourself in order to stand out from the crowd. An important guide to starting up a remarkable career.”
—Reid Hoffman, co-founder & chairman of LinkedIn and co-author of the bestselling The Start-Up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career
books  Cal_Newport  passions  purpose  skills  superstars 
june 2013 by jerryking
A Day in the Life of Sheila Johnson - WSJ.com
May 20, 2013 | WSJ | By JEFFREY PODOLSKY.

A Day in the Life of Sheila Johnson
A TV pioneer has parlayed her fortune into a consortium built on personal passions.
angels  BET  African-Americans  television  passions  passion_investing  women 
may 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
Flight Risks
November 2005 | Worth | by Dan Rosen.

Angel investors often get caught up with charismatic and passionate entrepreneurs. It‘s the joy and the danger of angel investing. For angel investing to work, investors and entrepreneurs need that shared passion and vision. But angel investing is not for the faint of heart. Seedstage investments tie up your money for a long time because you are investing early in the life of a company whose typical gestation period is six to eight years. No individual can do (nor does a relatively modest investment justify) the depth of analysis and due diligence that professional investors such as venture capitalists conduct; that often makes decisions difficult. And the likelihood that several additional rounds of financing will follow your initial investment and dilute your stake causes a large financial risk....Know your strengths, weaknesses and desires. If they don‘t match angel investing, don’t do it. If they do, have Fun.
angels  due_diligence  illiquidity  start_ups  financial_risk  risks  passions  strengths  early-stage  weaknesses  self-awareness 
march 2013 by jerryking
It’s the P.Q. and C.Q. as Much as the I.Q. - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: January 29, 2013

If America is to sustain the kind of public institutions and safety nets that we’re used to, it will require a lot more growth by the private side (not just more taxes), a lot more entrepreneurship, a lot more start-ups and a lot more individual risk-taking — things the president rarely speaks about....Facebook, Twitter, cloud computing, LinkedIn, 4G wireless, ultra-high-speed bandwidth, big data, Skype, system-on-a-chip (SOC) circuits, iPhones, iPods, iPads and cellphone apps, in combination, have taken us from connected to hyperconnected.... the old average is over. Everyone who wants a job now must demonstrate how they can add value better than the new alternatives....Indeed, when the digital revolution gets so cheap, fast, connected and ubiquitous you see this in three ways, Brynjolfsson added: those with more education start to earn much more than those without it, those with the capital to buy and operate machines earn much more than those who can just offer their labor, and those with superstar skills, who can reach global markets, earn much more than those with just slightly less talent....How to adapt? It will require more individual initiative...more of the “right” education than less...develop skills that are complementary to technology rather than ones that can be easily replaced by it... everyone needs to be innovating new products and services to employ the people who are being liberated from routine work by automation and software. The winners won’t just be those with more I.Q. It will also be those with more P.Q. (passion quotient) and C.Q. (curiosity quotient) to leverage all the new digital tools to not just find a job, but to invent one or reinvent one, and to not just learn but to relearn for a lifetime.
career_paths  entrepreneurship  innovation  network_density  risk-taking  Tom_Friedman  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Andrew_McAfee  MIT  curiosity  passions  semiconductors  automation  software  new_products  life_long_learning  Pablo_Picasso  individual_initiative  safety_nets  intrinsically_motivated  winner-take-all  Cambrian_explosion  superstars  cheap  fast  ubiquity  digital_revolution 
january 2013 by jerryking
Nine key traits to make the shift from failure to success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 09 2012

1. Rebounders accept failure: They hate to fail, but they accept it, and try to fail productively, learning from the experience, as the inventive Thomas Edison did with his many failed experiments.

2. Rebounders compartmentalize options: They are often emotional people, with drive and passion. John Bogle, who founded Vanguard Group, was furious when he was pushed out of a previous job and even had revenge fantasies. But he didn’t spend time trying to get even. Rebounders control the emotional fallout of their struggle (i.e. emotional mastery).

3. Rebounders have a bias toward action: After Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when her U.S. military helicopter was shot down in Iraq, her first impulse was to get to work at rehabilitation and her new life. Rebounders keep pushing, keep doing.

4. Rebounders change their minds: They can discard old thinking, give up on long-held dreams, and adjust their ambitions to evolving situations. They don’t cling to ideas that are proving hopeless.

5. Rebounders prepare for things to go wrong: They don’t expect things to go their own way. They are cautious optimists, always aware their plans may go awry.

6. Rebounders are comfortable with discomfort: They are willing to accept hardships and inconveniences as long as they feel they are getting closer to their goal. Singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams could have signed a major recording deal years earlier if she had agreed to make the songs the music companies wanted, but she stayed true to her own vision, even if it meant often barely having the money to pay her rent.

7. Rebounders are willing to wait: They are determined to succeed on their own terms, and can accept that it might take a long time. “But rebounders don’t just wait positively for a lucky break, or do the same thing over and over. They constantly learn and get better, continually improving the likelihood of success until the odds tilt in their favour,” Mr. Newman observes.

8. Rebounders have heroes: Many of the rebounders he met are romantics, seeing their role as in some way historic, and they are entranced by some mentor or historical figure who they want to emulate. Vanguard’s Mr. Bogle, for example, often alluded to the naval battles of Admiral Lord Nelson and named his mutual fund company after his hero’s ship.

9. Rebounders have more than passion: We are told we need passion for success, but rebounders realize it requires more than that. They have a special drive and resilience that allows them to capitalize on their passion.
bouncing_back  resilience  Harvey_Schachter  emotional_mastery  personality_types/traits  ksfs  long-term  patience  preparation  contingency_planning  reflections  self-analysis  self-awareness  thinking_tragically  discomforts  strategic_patience  adaptability  inconveniences  passions  heroes  pragmatism  compartmentalization  action-oriented  hardships  next_play 
october 2012 by jerryking
Vineyard Ventures
California vineyards are on the upswing as investors move to capitalize on surging demand for wine, brokers say. Among the buyers are private-equity firms as well as investment groups that specialize in wine-relqted proje_cts. Industry insiders “are convinced there will be a grape shortage, and that’s driving up prices for vineyard land,” says David Ashcraft a broker associate at Bergman-Euro National, a Napa Valley real-estate agency.
In October, a vineyard near St. Helena sold the day it was listed, he says. The $13.5 million price translates to about $225,000 per usable acre for planting, well above average, Mr. Ashcraft says. The upturn is limited so far to highqualhtyr vineyards in Northern California and, to some extent, along the central coast, he says.
Tony Ford of Full Spectrum Properties cites the $250 million-plus purchase of Duckhorn move into a more conservative mid- to longterm investment, and given the demand for wine, that fits the vineyard market,” he says.
private_equity  passions  vineyards  insiders 
august 2012 by jerryking
Thomas Perkins
August 26, 1996 | FORBES ASAP |Owen Edwards
Kleiner_Perkins  venture_capital  vc  trailblazers  HP  Tom_Perkins  passions 
july 2012 by jerryking
Cashing In, Business Valuation Article - Inc. Article
Aug 1, 2004 | Inc.com | by Ian Mount. Profiles of four entrepreneurs who cashed in -- and what they bought afterwards.
entrepreneur  exits  Second_Acts  passions  passion_investing 
july 2012 by jerryking
When Opportunity Knocks and Knocks - NYTimes.com
August 15, 2007 | WSJ| By BRENT BOWERS.

''We boomers are searchers,'' she said. ''We've done a lot, and we want to merge what we like to do with our plans of what to do next. Or, we may not want to do something we've done before; we might want to try something entirely new. So the question becomes not just, 'What business will I run?' but ''What will I do with my life?' ''

Ms. Smith applauded Mr. Weitz for taking his search so seriously. ''There will be more and more people like him, and they will give a new definition of entrepreneurship,'' she said.

Acting as matchmaker, I set up a phone conversation between searcher and strategist.
search_funds  baby_boomers  entrepreneur  yoga  opportunities  passion_investing  passions  entrepreneurship 
june 2012 by jerryking
Forging Ahead
April 9, 2007 | Worth

Wealthy seniors far from retiring.

Gone are the days when retirement was associated with a rocking chair. Older millionaires are returning to the workforce or redirecting their energy to volunteer work and travel, according to the Northern Trust Wealth in America 2007 survey released April 2.

Among the 1,002 respondents to an online survey conducted last November and December, 48 percent said they were retired, but 29 percent have returned to the workforce—18 percent part time and 7 percent full time, with 4 percent looking for work. Among respondents older than 70, one in six remains in the workforce, either rejoining the ranks of the working after retirement or never retiring at all.

“Retired business owners and executives tell us that they want to give back the knowledge they've gained during their careers." said Gregg Yaeger, head of the financial Consulting Group at Northern Trust. “And many continue to explore and start or invest in new ventures."

Seventy-six percent of respondents said ensuring a comfortable standard of living was a key retirement Issue, while health-related issues, both financial and physical, also ranked as top concerns. The study found that 64 percent of millionaires believe It is important to pursue personal interests and hobbies in retirement; 61 percent want to travel; 53 percent desire an active lifestyle; 30 percent want to volunteer in their communities; and 30 percent would like to continue their education.
surveys  high_net_worth  retirement  work_ethic  work_habits  start_ups  passions  passion_investing  seniorpreneurs  owners  Second_Acts 
june 2012 by jerryking
Second Wind
September 2005 | Worth | By Jeff and Rich Sloan.

1. Choose a business (and a role within it) that reflects your personal passion and lifestyle.
2. Spend 20 hours working each week instead of 60.
3. Place the importance of your employees" personal success as your company's financial bottom line
4. Use your VIP status to open doors that most small companies can only dream of opening.
5. Drop the corporate diplomacy you perfected in years past and replace it with straight talk.
6. Hire pcople who not only share your vision but who are willing to take big risks and take your vision to new heights.
7. Set up the company so they can run it.
8. Have fun!
Gulliver_strategies  retirement  Second_Acts  serial_entrepreneur  factoring  passions  passion_investing  lifestyles  seniorpreneurs 
june 2012 by jerryking
Rules to Live By, and Break, According to Staples Founder Thomas Stemberg - Knowledge@Wharton
January 14, 2004 in Knowledge@Wharton

Thomas Stemberg, founder and executive chairman of Staples, an office products retail chain, doesn’t buy one piece of advice that is often given to aspiring entrepreneurs: Follow your passion.

These words have spawned a stream of bankrupt restaurants and golf companies. “I think following your passion is a really dumb idea. I follow a great market that provides an opportunity to satisfy customers and to make money.”....Most of the dozens of business plans Stemberg sees each week propose marketing improvements of products or services that already exist. “None of these are good ideas,” he said. “Great ideas are [based on] identifying a true need in the marketplace and then finding a way to service it.”
Thomas_Stemberg  Staples  entrepreneur  problem_solving  market_sizing  passions  large_markets 
november 2011 by jerryking
Fine tuning for the perfect pitch
August 3 2005 18:49 | Financial Times | Fergal Byrne.

The pitch is the business plan distilled to its essence: a 10- to 20-minute presentation followed by a question-and-answer session. In some cases, particularly when facing venture capitalists, the Q&A can take place during the pitch....“The business plan is the all-encompassing thesis on why the business is a good opportunity, the pitch is the entrepreneur’s defence of the opportunity,”...
The odds of pitching success are not high: one study of Canadian business angels, for example, suggests almost three-quarters of opportunities were rejected at this stage before the business plan was given serious consideration.
(1) Passion wins hearts and minds.
(2) Less is more. A pitch needs to be concise to whet investors’ appetites. Guy Kawasaki, from Garage Venture, encapsulates his approach in his “10/20/30 rule”. He recommends entrepreneurs present no more than 10 slides, speak for no more than 20 minutes and write in 30-point font size. “The brevity forces an entrepreneur to purify his or her pitch.
(3) Become the product. Entrepreneurs need to apply the same discipline to sell themselves as they do to sell their product,
(4)Solve a problem – segment the market. Products need to solve a specific problem. Too often investors see ideas that are “solutions looking for a problem” or solutions trying to address too many problems.
(5)Master the domain – be candid. Answering investors’ questions during the Q&A is a vital part of the screening process. Entrepreneurs need to respond intelligently, to show they can read people, listen and interact...It is vital that presenters do not become defensive or aggressive during the presentation but respond in a calm, conversational manner.
entrepreneurship  start_ups  pitches  business_planning  angels  Guy_Kawasaki  Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  problem_solving  passions  product-market_fit  specificity  concision  brevity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Wealth Matters - The Rules That Madoff’s Investors Ignored - NYTimes.com
January 6, 2009 | | By PAUL SULLIVAN.

THE 10 PERCENT RULE The saddest Madoff stories are the ones about life savings lost. These were people who had, say, $5 million in one of his funds and now have nothing. Honestly, the people themselves need to bear some responsibility for this. The most basic book on investing will tell you never to put more than 5 or 10 percent into any one investment, particularly one meant to preserve wealth…Having a concentrated stock position when you’re working for a company is sometimes unavoidable. If you were a senior executive at Lehman or Bear Stearns, a part of your bonus was paid in shares, and such restricted stock needs to be held for a period of time, generally two to seven years. Having a concentrated position in other circumstances, however, is foolish. Any responsible wealth manager works to reduce or hedge a person’s concentrated stock position. With Mr. Madoff, investors went the other way and added money year after year. Discipline is key: stick to 10 percent or less and remember that any investment can go bust.
CONSISTENCY IS BAD - Consistency at the highest level isn’t bad; it’s impossible. There are too many variables that inhibit being great on a regular basis.
THE GRAND FALLOON Kurt Vonnegut coined this phrase in “Cat’s Cradle,” and never did it have a more devastating application than in the Madoff scheme. In Vonnegut’s world, a grand falloon was a false association mistaken for friendship — two people from the same town, same university, same company meet somewhere and believe that coincidental connection has significant meaning. It doesn’t, no more so than belonging to the Palm Beach Country Club or the Fifth Avenue Synagogue did for those who used their proximity to Mr. Madoff to coax him into taking their money.
This is a crucial point particularly in opaque investments, from hedge funds to private equity partnerships: just because someone is a good golfer does not mean he should be trusted to invest your money. Private bankers are forever telling their clients not to try to get into someone’s hedge fund just because you enjoyed their conversation on the course — or, worse, want to play with them again. Like taking care of your health, picking an investment adviser should be done with the utmost rigor.
‘DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL’ - Ask questions and don’t assume the person who brings an investment to you has vetted it. Nothing in which you are putting millions of dollars is so wonderful that it cannot withstand scrutiny.
PUT MONEY IN BUCKETS - follow the popular wisdom of private bank investment strategists: divide your money into buckets to insure the money you need to live on will always be safe. Most strategists advise putting your riskiest assets into your philanthropy bucket.
Bernard_Madoff  high_net_worth  fraud  mistakes  opacity  friendships  trustworthiness  diversification  biases  personal_finance  financial_planning  grand_falloon  wealth_management  concentrated_stock_positions  high-risk  philanthropy  due_diligence  passions  passion_investing  impact_investing 
october 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs and the Power of Taking the Big Chance - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: October 8, 2011

DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO DELIGHT CUSTOMERS
GOOD IDEAS TAKE TIME
DON’T DWELL ON MISTAKES.
PASSION COUNTS FOR A LOT
Steve_Jobs  Steve_Lohr  lessons_learned  risk-taking  failure  mistakes  passions  delighting_customers 
october 2011 by jerryking
How to Make Your Co-Workers Smarter
May 11, 2011| BNET | By Jessica Stillman.
Learn about people’s passions. You can’t connect with others if you
don’t know anything about them. So, who are they? Ask lots of questions.
What inspires or drives them? What are their goals? What have they
learned recently?
Get over yourself. Flip your focus from yourself to the other
person. When you say to yourself, “He hates me” or “She thinks I’m
stupid,” you are making someone else’s behavior about you [jk: emotional mastery]. Change your
perspective. For instance, if you are thinking, “I want her to think I’m
smart” flip your focus to “I want her to be smart.”
Make connections. When interacting with small groups, be a
“connector” by calling out each person’s unique talents or strengths.
Help people connect the dots and see that two or more heads really are
better than one.
Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  co-workers  curiosity  emotional_mastery  empowerment  howto  ice-breakers  passions  questions  serving_others  smart_people  teams  workplaces 
may 2011 by jerryking
For Love and Money
November 27, 2006 | Fortune Magazine | by Eugenie Levenson.
Includes references to other companies where the high net worth
individual bought the company (Channel Island Surfboards, Lionel trains,
Pr Iofessional Bowling Associations & Glaceau) for
“love”. Offers tips on avoiding Chapter 11 if a company is being bought
for “love”.
motorcycles  HBS  boating  turnarounds  filetype:pdf  media:document  high_net_worth  investors  passions 
december 2010 by jerryking
What is Scarce in Advocacy and Campaigns?
August 28, 2007 | NetCentric Advocacy | Ways for Campaigns
to be unique and offer something scarce... (things you have that others
don't in a mass marketing world)...

1. Real stories.
2. Genuine passion.
3. A base of real people that care about the issue.
4. Staff that have insights on the science, politics, policies and
dynamics at play that keep an issue form being solved.
5. The ability to convene people that care.
6. Clarity and purpose in a world of shallow consumerism
7. No need to make money while solving a problem ( can do things that
solve problems and loose money by design)
8. you have fun working on an issue most people would burn out on.
9. maybe truth and science to support your claims.
10. faith and confidence in your work.
advocacy  authenticity  campaigns  cause_marketing  passions  public_relations  scarcity  storytelling 
october 2010 by jerryking
Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything - Tony Schwartz - The Conversation
August 24, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | by Tony Schwartz.
Here are 6 keys to achieving excellence: 1. Pursue what you love.
Passion is an incredible motivator. 2. Do the hardest work first.
3. Practice intensely, without interruption for short periods of no
longer than 90 minutes and then take a break.
4. Seek expert feedback, in intermittent doses. The simpler and more
precise the feedback, the more equipped you are to make adjustments. Too
much feedback, too continuously, however, can create cognitive
overload, increase anxiety, and interfere with learning.
5. Take regular renewal breaks. Relaxing after intense effort not
only provides an opportunity to rejuvenate, but also to metabolize and
embed learning. It's also during rest that the right hemisphere becomes
more dominant, which can lead to creative breakthroughs. 6. Ritualize
practice
hbr  tips  self-improvement  JCK  intensity  focus  feedback  Tony_Schwartz  passions  metabolism  excellence  practice  rituals  intermittency  creative_renewal  breakthroughs  disconnecting 
september 2010 by jerryking
Jobs: Passion—or a Steady Paycheck? - BusinessWeek
August 5, 2010,- BusinessWeekBy John Seely Brown
More people are leaving behind uninspiring careers and trying to earn a
living from work they love. The government can help them reinvent
themselves
career_paths  reinvention  motivations  passions 
august 2010 by jerryking
The New Phrase for Indulgence: ‘Passionate Investing’ - The Wealth Report - WSJ
* May 17, 2010, 11:47 By Robert Frank

“Wealthy individuals still have money but now they are combining investment with improving the quality of their lives through investing in assets with which they have emotional attachments,” says Susan Ellis, financial analyst at Datamonitor. “It is a way to invest and spend simultaneously while adding to the richness of their lives,” she says.

She adds that the wealthy are seeking “safe havens” that they can also enjoy, like jewelry and art.

She concedes that “the line between investment in tangibles and luxury expenditure can sometimes be blurred, particularly in a period of market uncertainty.” Yet she says the jump in some luxury sales is owed in part to “passionate investing.”

I agree that some of the the wealthy, having watched their millions or more disappear in 2008, would much rather lose money on things they can drink, drive or wear. But I’m not sure they see it as “investing.” To them, it could be a more simple matter of spending being far more enjoyable than losing an equivalent amount in the markets.
high_net_worth  Robert_Frank  passions  assets  emotional_commitment  emotional_connections  investors 
may 2010 by jerryking
Be The Advisor Who Helps Business Owners Respond To Change
Dec 1, 2008 National Underwriter | Life & Health | by John H Brown.

The US and world economies are changing fast. As an advisor to business owners, you know that, as a group, they are not as uneasy about the stock market's wild fluctuations as are the rest of your clients. You must reach out to your business owner clients. It is your job to understand that owners can still achieve their goals, to implement the strategies necessary to reach those goals and to share that information with your clients. Once business owners are clear about their objectives, you can evaluate the business and personal financial resources available to fund those objectives. Central to any company's planning is the need to motivate management to attain specific performance standards, such as meeting budget or reaching a specific sales goal or perhaps a departmental profitability objective. The current financial storm is not life threatening for most of your business owner clients -- if they respond.
ProQuest  financial_advisors  small_business  JCK  entrepreneur  passions  passion_investing  impact_investing  indispensable  owners  generating_strategic_options  objectives  control_systems  rewards 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Simple Dollar » The Five Ps: Breaking Down Big Dreams Into Little Steps
April 29, 2008 | The Simple Dollar | Written by Trent Hamm

Passion. Find it and know it.
Practice. Break your passion down into pieces and deliberately work on the elements.
Persistence. Practice as much as you can on an extremely regular basis, like clockwork.
Patience. Don’t expect to be great in a day, a month, or even a year.
Participation. Find new ways to get involved and share what you know.

Today, my friend, is a great day to get started.
break_down  inspiration  advice  productivity  writing  goals  patience  practice  persistence  passions  clockwork 
october 2009 by jerryking
Easing Back to Work After You've Retired - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 28, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.
(1) Leverage your expertise. (2) If need be, pursue a passion. (3)
Start your search now. (4) Get up to date.(5) Tap your network.(6) Hide
any resentment.
Sarah_E._Needleman  retirement  baby_boomers  tips  Second_Acts  passions  expertise 
may 2009 by jerryking
Boomers Turn to 'Hobby' Jobs
Feb 7, 2007. |Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York,
N.Y.: pg. B.5D| by Victoria Knight.

Insufficient savings and longer life spans mean some boomer can't
afford to give up work entirely. So they should consider part-time
"hobby" jobs, defined as paid tasks that are enjoyable rather than a
chore.
baby_boomers  retirement  Second_Acts  passions  passion_investing 
april 2009 by jerryking
Giving Till It Works - WSJ.com
Oct. 10, 2008 book review by Richard J. Riordan which looks at
the rise of billionaires who increasingly, are attempting to apply the
lessons of business success--monitoring investments, measuring
results--to their charitable efforts.
books  moguls  book_reviews  charities  entrepreneurship  capitalism  nonprofit  philanthropy  Eli_Broad  billgates  benefactors  passions  impact_investing  social_impact 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read