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jerryking : paternalism   2

Black Republicans See a White Convention, Heavy on Lectures - The New York Times
by PATRICK HEALY, YAMICHE ALCINDOR and JEREMY W. PETERSJULY 19, 2016

Black Republicans said they had preferred the political messages to black voters at recent conventions, where the focus was less on public safety and crime than on economic opportunity, job creation, support for small businesses and school choice — all issues, they said, that held appeal.

In Cleveland, however, Mr. Trump and Republican Party leaders are focused on appealing to white voters, particularly white men who are critical to their electoral strategy in the Midwest and the South.....Black speakers who did speak from the podium seemed focused more on castigating black protesters, scolding other blacks for their behavior and exalting Mr. Trump than on trying to help Republicans make inroads with undecided or skeptical black voters.....“How we talk directly about a community of people, and how we talk indirectly about a community of people, matters,” said Michael Steele, who was the first black chairman of the Republican National Committee. “Rudy’s not living in their neighborhoods. And he doesn’t understand what’s motivating them.”

Mr. Steele added, “The coding, the language and the wording becomes a distraction.”

Some Republicans said privately that they were uncomfortable that convention planners had tapped black speakers to chastise black protesters in front of a mostly white crowd, which seemed to lap it up.
African-Americans  GOP  RNC  David_Clarke  conservatism  Campaign_2016  paternalism  condescension  Southern_strategy  Black_Lives_Matter  dog_whistles  whites  white_men 
july 2016 by jerryking
Why China and Japan Can’t Get Along - NYTimes.com
By ODD ARNE WESTAD
Published: January 6, 2013

few economies and societies on earth more complementary than China’s and Japan’s. The Chinese are relatively young, poor and restless and fiercely committed to economic growth. The Japanese are relatively old and sated, but technologically advanced and devoted to guarding their high standard of living. Proximity would seem to make the two nations ideally suited to benefit from each other.

But Japan is afraid of China’s rise, because the Chinese economy is so much more dynamic than Japan’s. And China is troubled by Japan, because the island nation seems to act as an unsinkable American aircraft carrier just off its coast....Japan’s rise in the late 19th century was seen as an affront by China, which had always felt entitled to the mantle of regional leadership. Mao Zedong and other founders of the Chinese Communist Party adopted these views and bequeathed them to their successors.

Most Chinese today therefore regard Japan’s wealth, and its position as America’s main ally in Asia, as results of ill-gotten gains. Even when the Chinese state was at its weakest, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, its elites felt that the Confucianism China had exported to its key neighbors — Korea, Japan and Vietnam — was the root of a common culture. Other countries in the “Confucian zone” were supposed to simply accept China’s natural leadership.

Beijing’s policies in the South China Sea today resemble those of the Qing empire, China’s last ruling dynasty, in the late 18th century. The emperor then, Qianlong, liked to speak to the “myriad nations” to the south as a father would address his children. Current Chinese leaders, who are exerting their influence in countries like Vietnam and Laos, echo his paternalism. ...
China  disputes  Japan  history  Asian  Asia_Pacific  Confucian  chauvinism  South_China_Sea  paternalism  19th_century  China_rising 
january 2013 by jerryking

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