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jerryking : personality_types/traits   24

You must do these two difficult things to invest as patiently as the greats - The Globe and Mail
TOM BRADLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017

Great investors have differences, but they share a number of key attributes.

They have an independent view. They feel no obligation to invest in something because others are doing it or because it’s a part of an index. Indeed, they prefer when a stock isn’t popular or heavily traded.

They buy when opportunities present themselves, not when the money is available. Cash doesn’t burn a hole in their pocket.

They buy assets that, in their reasoned opinion, will eventually be worth considerably more than they’re able to purchase them for. The key word being eventually. Their time frame is only slightly shorter than that.

They don’t get hung up on short-term events, although they do monitor them closely so they can take advantage of opportunities. Price movements and/or liquidity events may allow them to buy more or sell, and any new information can be used to update their valuation models.

You get the picture. Patient capital is focused on long-term value creation. It’s comfortable being out-of-sync with popular trends. And it doesn’t get distressed by market dislocations, it gets excited.

If working with a financial adviser, they have to understand and believe in the patient-capital approach. No prattling from them about quick stock or ETF flips. No recommendations of "hot" fund managers nor cold feet when short-term results are poor.

You want advisers and money managers who can live up to the traits listed above and, ideally, who are working in organizations that exemplify the same traits. You and your adviser have a better chance of being “patient capital” if the firm’s sales, marketing, product development and investment strategies are aligned.
Tom_Bradley  investors  long-term  strategic_patience  liquidity_events  personality_types/traits  dislocations  undervalued  opportunistic  unanimity  personal_finance  financial_advisors  contrarians  independent_viewpoints  financial_pornography  best_of 
january 2017 by jerryking
Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid
11/18/2013| - Forbes| Cheryl Conner, Contributor

For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and health, when it comes down to it, mental strength can mean even more. Particularly for entrepreneurs, numerous articles talk about critical characteristics of mental strength—tenacity, “grit,” optimism, and an unfailing ability as Forbes contributor David Williams says, to “fail up.”...we can also define mental strength by identifying the things mentally strong individuals don’t do.
1. Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves.
2. Give Away Their Power.
3. Shy Away from Change.
4. Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control.

5. Worry About Pleasing Others.
6. Fear Taking Calculated Risks.
7. Dwell on the Past.
8. Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over.
9. Resent Other People’s Success.
10. Give Up After Failure.
11. Fear Alone Time.
12. Feel the World Owes Them Anything.
13. Expect Immediate Results.
grit  resilience  personality_types/traits  character_traits  habits  inspiration  beyond_one's_control  affirmations  overachievers  span_of_control  high-achieving 
december 2013 by jerryking
Finding Strength in Humility - NYTimes.com
November 15, 2013 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ

When we identify with a particular strength, the opposite we’re avoiding is almost always negative. For confidence, it’s insecurity or self-doubt. But what happens when we overuse confidence? It turns into arrogance, hubris and even grandiosity. Any strength overused eventually becomes toxic. Excessive honesty becomes cruelty. Tenacity congeals into rigidity. Bias for action can overwhelm thoughtful reflection.

This is where positive opposites serve as a balancing and humanizing role. Humility comes from the Latin word “humilis,” which literally means “low.” It resides just a stone’s throw from “humiliation.” Sure enough, excessive humility eventually softens into obsequiousness and self-subjugation. False humility is even worse: a conscious manipulation covertly aimed at winning praise, often to compensate for unacknowledged feelings of inadequacy.

But genuine humility is a reflection of neither weakness nor insecurity. Instead, it implies a respectful appreciation of the strengths of others, a lack of personal pretension and a more relaxed sense of confidence that doesn’t require external recognition.

In a complex world that so plainly and painfully defies easy answers, humility is also an antidote to overconfidence. It gives leaders permission to accept and acknowledge their limitations, to learn from them and continue to grow and evolve.....I don’t need to say out loud that I value confidence and strength. I do need to demonstrate that I also value humility and vulnerability – to embrace these opposites. In the end, the less time we spend protecting our own value, the more time we can spend creating value in the world.
Managing_Your_Career  humility  opposing_actions  personality_types/traits  character_traits  strengths  contemplation  reflections  pairs  overconfidence  dual-consciousness  self-doubt  arrogance  hubris  grandiosity  confidence  insecurity  honesty  cruelty  tenacity  rigidity  toxic_behaviors 
november 2013 by jerryking
Five traits of smart risk takers
March 13, 2013 | G&M | Harvey Schachter.

Review of Taking Smart Risks by Doug Sundheim. Sundheim lists five common dangers of playing it safe for too long:

• You don’t win.
• You don’t grow.
• You don’t create.
• You lose confidence as you lose momentum and start to freeze up.
• You don’t feel alive, because you aren't challenging yourself.
Harvey_Schachter  risks  risk-taking  books  book_reviews  soul-enriching  personality_types/traits  growth  cost_of_inaction  character_traits  complacency  risk-aversion  risk-avoidance  playing_it_safe 
march 2013 by jerryking
All I Want for Christmas Is... A Little Space
December 14, 2012 | WSJ| By SOPHIA DEMBLING.
All I Want for Christmas Is... A Little Space
Forget religion and politics. The real holiday war is between social butterflies and wallflowers
Christmas  personality_types/traits  character_traits 
december 2012 by jerryking
Inside the Minds of the Perfectionists - WSJ.com
October 29, 2012 | WSJ | Melinda Beck

Inside the Minds of the Perfectionists
Researchers Used to Blame Parenting but Studies Suggest a Genetic Link; Procrastination is a Problem
Melinda_Beck  personality_types/traits  character_traits 
october 2012 by jerryking
Nine key traits to make the shift from failure to success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 09 2012

1. Rebounders accept failure: They hate to fail, but they accept it, and try to fail productively, learning from the experience, as the inventive Thomas Edison did with his many failed experiments.

2. Rebounders compartmentalize options: They are often emotional people, with drive and passion. John Bogle, who founded Vanguard Group, was furious when he was pushed out of a previous job and even had revenge fantasies. But he didn’t spend time trying to get even. Rebounders control the emotional fallout of their struggle (i.e. emotional mastery).

3. Rebounders have a bias toward action: After Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when her U.S. military helicopter was shot down in Iraq, her first impulse was to get to work at rehabilitation and her new life. Rebounders keep pushing, keep doing.

4. Rebounders change their minds: They can discard old thinking, give up on long-held dreams, and adjust their ambitions to evolving situations. They don’t cling to ideas that are proving hopeless.

5. Rebounders prepare for things to go wrong: They don’t expect things to go their own way. They are cautious optimists, always aware their plans may go awry.

6. Rebounders are comfortable with discomfort: They are willing to accept hardships and inconveniences as long as they feel they are getting closer to their goal. Singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams could have signed a major recording deal years earlier if she had agreed to make the songs the music companies wanted, but she stayed true to her own vision, even if it meant often barely having the money to pay her rent.

7. Rebounders are willing to wait: They are determined to succeed on their own terms, and can accept that it might take a long time. “But rebounders don’t just wait positively for a lucky break, or do the same thing over and over. They constantly learn and get better, continually improving the likelihood of success until the odds tilt in their favour,” Mr. Newman observes.

8. Rebounders have heroes: Many of the rebounders he met are romantics, seeing their role as in some way historic, and they are entranced by some mentor or historical figure who they want to emulate. Vanguard’s Mr. Bogle, for example, often alluded to the naval battles of Admiral Lord Nelson and named his mutual fund company after his hero’s ship.

9. Rebounders have more than passion: We are told we need passion for success, but rebounders realize it requires more than that. They have a special drive and resilience that allows them to capitalize on their passion.
bouncing_back  resilience  Harvey_Schachter  emotional_mastery  personality_types/traits  ksfs  long-term  patience  preparation  contingency_planning  reflections  self-analysis  self-awareness  thinking_tragically  discomforts  strategic_patience  adaptability  inconveniences  passions  heroes  pragmatism  compartmentalization  action-oriented  hardships  next_play 
october 2012 by jerryking
Three top traits of leaders - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Friday, Sep. 21 2012,

three top traits for leaders to emphasize as they move through the ranks: Influence over others, to sell ideas; high energy levels to accommodate the increase in time demands that occur at successive levels of leadership; and a take-charge approach, combining a more directive style that involves delegating tasks and imposing action....At the same time, the research suggests leaders must give up the following traits as they move up the ladder:

· Passive-aggressiveness: Instead of going along to avoid conflict and then lashing out, as you rise in ranks you can be more direct about what you think.

· Micro-management: You now need to focus on managing outcomes, rather than fussing about the details.

· Manipulation: You no longer have to hide your agenda and try to twist people towards your desired direction. You should lead by influence and be transparent about your goals.

· Attention to detail: This helped you before you rose to management and in the first levels of management, but as you gain a broader scope of responsibility you must think more strategically, which can be blocked if you get lost in details.
movingonup  Harvey_Schachter  leaders  personality_types/traits  detail_oriented  personal_energy  action-oriented  transparency  micro-management  passive-aggressive  think_threes  pitches 
october 2012 by jerryking
Five key traits of successful consultants - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Monday, Sep. 24 2012,

Intellectual Capacity

You have to be smart, well-trained and experienced – and have the educational credentials to back you up, be it an MBA or specialized training in your specific field of focus. “Competition for management consultants is likely to remain keen, and those with the most education and experience will have the best prospects,” she writes. Maturity and lots of contacts from a long career can be helpful; younger individuals have youth on their side but should expand their portfolio through as many varied experiences as possible.

Self-Confidence

You must be strong and confident about your abilities, but also low maintenance, ego in check. Although a hired hand for the organizations you work with, you must be a leader, motivating others and working in a collaborative way to nudge clients to solutions they might not have reached on their own.

Moxie

You need courage, energy, vision – and spunk. “It is the capacity to go against the common view, to walk into a room of fractious stakeholders who don’t support the evaluation and don’t want to hear about the findings. It is the ability to land in a strange town at midnight, scrape the snow and ice off your rental car, and locate your motel without the benefit of a map. It is being able to get up the day after you have lost the best proposal you have ever written and start all over again,” she notes.

Adaptability

Your work is defined by the rigid parameters set out by proposals and contracts, but you must still be light on your feet as you operate with the whole world in a state of flux. Try to keep your proposals more open-ended to handle unexpected issues that will inevitably crop up as you progress with your work.

Endurance

Some people enter the field viewing it as a stopgap between paid employment, while others view consulting as offering independence that will be a welcome relief to the stultifying atmosphere in the organizations where they have worked.
ksfs  Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  self-confidence  personality_types/traits  character_traits  chutzpah  endurance  adaptability  individual_initiative  open-ended 
october 2012 by jerryking
What Makes a Top Executive?
1983 | Psychology Today | by Morgan W.McCall, Jr. and Michael M. Lombardo.
Executives, like the rest of us, are a patchwork of strengths and weaknesses....The fatal flaws of executives who failed to live up to their potential.

1. Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating style.
2. Cold, aloof, arrogant
3. Betrayal of Trust—failure to meet commitments.
4. Overly ambitious—plays politics, pushes too hard to get ahead.
5. Failure to handle specific performance problems—failure to handle problems then not admit the problem, try to cover up or shift blame.
6. Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team.
7. Unable to select and develop an effective staff.
8. Unable to think broadly or strategically—too much attention to detail and minor technical problems.
9. Unable to adapt to a boss with a different style.
10. Overdependence on one’s boss or mentor.

These flaws matter because:
1. Strengths become weaknesses
2. Deficiencies eventually matter
3. Success goes to their heads
4. Events conspire

Part of handling adversity lies in knowing what not to do. Know which behavioural patterns will colleagues and superiors consider intolerable...Seek diversity in the forms of success.
executive_management  CEOs  movingonup  career_ending_moves  leadership  listening  Myers-Briggs  managing_people  EQ  Managing_Your_Career  personality_types/traits  leadership_development  character_traits  strengths  weaknesses  people_skills 
july 2012 by jerryking
Champions of Change: Identifying, Understanding, and Supporting Champions of Technological Innovations - ProQuest
Summer 1990 | Organizational Dynamics | Christopher Higgins & Jane Howell.

This article presents the results of 25 interviews of personnel managers who were able to promote changes in business organizations through different methods of human resource management. Extremely high self-confidence, persistence, energy, and risk taking are the hallmark personality characteristics of champions. Champions show extraordinary confidence in themselves and their mission. They are motivated by a passionate belief, and enthusiasm about, the nature of the technology and what it can do for the company. Related to their self-confidence is the champions' capacity to cling tenaciously to their ideas and to persist in promoting them despite frequent obstacles and seemingly imminent failures. By actively promoting their ideas, often by repeating the same arguments over and over, champions overcome the opposition. Inexhaustible energy the unflagging vitality, is also a salient characteristic of champions. In many cases, champions willingly risk their position and prestige to ensure the innovation's success. Interestingly, while champions claim to be risk takers, many of them psychologically minimize the amount of personal risk associated with their involvement in the innovation.
Ivey  change  change_management  champions  ProQuest  leadership  personality_types/traits  change_agents  eels  personal_risk  self-confidence  mission-driven 
july 2012 by jerryking
"Portrait of a perfect salesman."
3 May 2012| Financial Times | Philip Delves Broughton.

Tips for closing any deal

Know the odds

Most salespeople face far more rejection than acceptance. Knowing how many calls or meetings it takes to make each sale helps develop the positive attitude vital to succeed. After all, 99 rejections may be just the prelude to that triumphant yes.

Find a selling environment that suits you

Some people are great seducers, others dogged persuaders. Some like to make lots of sales each day, others prefer making one a year. Some enjoy high financial incentives, others thrive on the human relationships. Decide who you are first, then find a sales role that suits your personality type.

Be your customer's partner not their adversary

Great salespeople create value around products and services that they can convey and deliver to their customers. Paying attention and acting in the interests of your customer rather than yourself is very difficult. But as information about price and features becomes more widely available, service and relationships become the real value in each sale.
sales  selling  Philip_Delves_Broughton  Salesforce  character_traits  personality_types/traits  customer_centricity  ratios  partnerships  relationships  rejections  salesmanship  salespeople  success_rates  customer_focus  pay_attention  positive_thinking  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Genius and Beauty of Strengths
“From my experience, each of the themes of talent identified by the Clifton StrengthsFinder Inventory has a stroke of genius within it. The genius of our talents reflects what those talents enable and empower us to do to potential levels of excellence. The concept of genius refers to an extraordinary ability to do certain things, and as such there is great beauty in seeing what is done by the genius within individuals.”
introspection  personality_types/traits  self-analysis  strengths 
march 2012 by jerryking
HIRE LEARNING
22 Nov. 2006 | Report on Small Business | by Ken Hunt.

Finding the best people for the job takes time, money and focus.

(1) Know what you're looking for
(2) Consider how a new hire will fit into your company culture.
(3) Don't wait until you're desperate to hire.
(4)Use structured interviews.
(5) Ask behaviour-based questions.
(6) Get referrals.
(7) Check references and qualifications.
hiring  talent_management  interviews  personality_types/traits  small_business  referrals  reference-checking  references  cross-checking 
december 2011 by jerryking
Improving Your, Um, You Know, Public Speaking - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 3, 2011 | WSJ | By ELIZABETH GARONE.

Send to Koreen

Teach Public Speaking to Anyone!: A Building-Block Approach (Paperback)
by Milton Wood
http://ezinearticles.com/?A-Simple-Guide-to-Public-Speaking&id=1330715
Know your audience:
What could you incorporate into your opening remarks, which can set the stage for a lively interaction? For example, is there an issue of general, topical interest that you could mention?
public_speaking  Communicating_&_Connecting  speeches  Myers-Briggs  know_your_audience  personality_types/traits 
november 2011 by jerryking
"The bruises of the bandwagon: ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Reality television is revealing how desperately some people want to break into business. But many fail to analyse their ideas,
Apr. 25, 2005 | Financial Times pg 16.| by Paul Tyrrell

Everyone wants to run their own business. But many fail to prepare thoroughly before scrambling on to the bandwagon. Among the television hopefuls, the most widespread and humiliating trait is a failure to appreciate that an entrepreneur's personal qualities are just as important as their ideas.

It is a salutary warning. Venture capitalists and business angels have always been more inclined to back a great team with a mediocre idea than a mediocre team with a great idea. They attach a lot of importance to what they term "scar tissue" - evidence that the person has learned from experience.

"People who are enamoured of their own idea can be great, but only if they listen really hard,"... "Nothing goes to plan, so you're looking for people you can trust off-plan." ...Entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed if they can come up with an idea that exploits their experience. This is particularly clear in product development situations - for example, where an engineer takes the knowledge he gains at a large company and uses it to set up a rival.

Research suggests that "spin-outs have a survival edge in the market over other entrants as the result of a combination of entrepreneurial flexibility and inherited knowledge"....what distinguishes successful entrepreneurs is their ability to spot commercially exploitable patterns where others cannot. Herbert Simon, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, suggests this process is intuitive: a good business idea stems from the creative linking, or cross-association of two or more in-depth "chunks" of experience - know-how and contacts.
Infotrac_Newsstand  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  pattern_recognition  personality_types/traits  television  spin-offs  entertainment  venture_capital  angels  cross-pollination  tacit_data  knowledge_intensive  scar_tissue  teams  team_risk  off-plan  Plan_B  tacit_knowledge  nimbleness  combinations 
november 2011 by jerryking
What's Next? Ever wonder what you'd do if you sold your business? These six entrepreneurs have some surprising answers. - April 1, 2004
By Anne Fisher
April 1, 2004

The entrepreneurs mentioned here can easily afford to do whatever they want, including nothing. Yet especially among this group, it seems that the word "retirement" itself needs to go find a rocking chair someplace. There are no statistics on what small-business owners do after they sell their companies--no one is counting, for example, how many launch another startup. But among boomer entrepreneurs, now in their early 40s to late 50s, who built thriving businesses and then sold them or took them public, the idea of idling away the hours is anathema. Instead, most start or buy another business or set out to save the world (or just a small corner of it) through nonprofit work. Or they pursue some combination of the two--often with time left over for that morning tennis match and Tuesday night Hold 'Em....Says Verne Harnish, CEO of Gazelles, an executive-development firm for small to midsized companies: "With the mergers-and-acquisitions market sizzling and big companies trying to buy innovation, right now is the perfect moment to sell a business and go and do something else." ...The answer for most of those type-A personalities is not whiling away time on the beach. (For an exception, see the profile of the retired management-training entrepreneur who, after some difficulty and with practice, has adapted to a life that includes skiing at least 80 days a year.)..."When people ask what I do, my wife tells them I'm a private investor,"
exits  serial_entrepreneur  retirement  Second_Acts  gazelles  small_business  personality_types/traits  seniorpreneurs 
november 2011 by jerryking
Parenting Advice for Type A Parents Raising Type B Children - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 19, 2011 | WSJ | By SUE SHELLENBARGER.

Ambitious Parents, Mellow Children
Driven Type A's Often Struggle To Raise Type B Kids
personality_types/traits  parenting  children  fatherhood  advice  character_traits 
november 2011 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Split personalities
October 6, 2011 | Report on Small Business| by Doug Steiner.
Entrepreneurs often share fundamental traits and visions. Getting the mix right is the hard part.
"I've had to sit through a lot of painful business idea proposals. My job isn't to cut people off, but to listen. No eye rolling or sighing, because there's a nugget of a good idea in every pitch, no matter how bad. After listening to so many of them, I now have a theory of how to bucket them into various categories "
Doug_Steiner  entrepreneur  personality_types/traits  pitches  proposals 
october 2011 by jerryking
Before You Tie the Knot... - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 26, 2007 WSJ article by SHELLY BANJO. Many people
jump too hastily into business relationships. Too many people think they
know a friend or colleague well enough to start a business together,
only to discover they don't. The key to success is as simple as it is
complex: homework. Communications, Personalities and Shared Values,
Partnership Agreements, Keep Talking
small_business  Communicating_&_Connecting  Shelly_Banjo  personality_types/traits  partnerships  preparation  due_diligence  values  relationships 
march 2009 by jerryking
Problem workers may not be the problem
Sept. 26, 2008 G&M article by Wallace Immen pointing out
the problem may be the way people of differing personality types are
managed.
Managing_Your_Career  managing_people  Wallace_Immen  filetype:pdf  media:document  personality_types/traits 
january 2009 by jerryking

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