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jerryking : persuasion   30

Opinion | The Whistle-Blower’s Guide to Writing
Sept. 27, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jane Rosenzweig. Ms. Rosenzweig is the director of the Writing Center at Harvard.
active_voice  best_of  brevity  clarity  complaints  concision  focus  high-quality  howto  impeachment  intelligence_analysts  memoranda  persuasion  presentations  purpose  self-organization  topic_sentences  writing 
18 days ago by jerryking
Why is America so bad at information wars?
JULY 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett.

In his new book Messing With the Enemy, Clint Watts, a former FBI agent, describes this exchange as the first “international-terrorist-versus-counter-terrorist Twitter battle”......One way to make sense of today’s extraordinary cyber battles with the Russians is to look at how jihadi groups developed such campaigns years earlier — not least because this oft-ignored parallel shows how the US government has done a poor job fighting its enemies in cyberspace. “America sucks at information warfare,” Watts laments. “Absolutely sucks.”.....US officials attempted to fight back against Isis’s social media campaigns. Watts reveals that in 2013 while at the FBI — and later as a security consultant — he engaged in a long Twitter duel with American-born terrorist Omar Hammami. Other US intelligence groups tried to develop psychological-operations campaigns to fight the extremists. Some of the experimental techniques used to profile social media users were later deployed in the ad-tech industry by companies such as Cambridge Analytica.

However, the US military was simply too bureaucratic, slow moving and rule-laden to match its enemies. And the country that seemed to learn the most from the social media extremists was Russia: Watts describes how he inadvertently witnessed Russian-backed groups populating American social media from the autumn of 2015 onwards, copying some of the tactics of the Islamists....Watts’s proposed remedy is just as startling: he believes that US government agencies are now so ill-equipped to fight in these type of social media wars that it is time for non-government groups to take the lead instead.....many leading figures in Silicon Valley furtively express similar views. Indeed, some appear to be quietly funding civilian “volunteers” to do exactly what Watts suggests: namely, hunt for ways to counter Russian attacks by infiltrating enemy cyber groups.

Who knows whether this type of grass-roots action will work, or how widespread it might be — everything is deeply murky in the arena of cyberspace and information wars.
Gillian_Tett  information_warfare  U.S.  security_&_intelligence  Twitter  al-Shabab  books  cyber_warfare  Russians  hackers  Russia  disinformation  persuasion  trolls  politics  delegitimization  destabilization  deception  infiltration 
july 2018 by jerryking
How Vladimir Putin mastered the cyber disinformation war
February 18, 2018 | FT | by Andrei Soldatov.

outsourcing cyber disinformation campaigns has become a tactic used by Russia to create plausible deniability and lower the costs and risks of controversial overseas operations. Today, Kremlin-backed cyber campaigns have an unorthodox chain of command. It is one in which non-state actors — primarily businessmen with personal ties to important figures in the Kremlin — call the shots, not, as in western cyber operations, the electronic and signals intelligence gathering wings of the army and government agencies.
Vladimir_Putin  Robert_Mueller  indictments  Russia  disinformation  persuasion  trolls  politics  delegitimization  destabilization  deception  cyber_warfare  information_warfare  Kremlin 
february 2018 by jerryking
Daring rather than data will save advertising
John Hegarty JANUARY 2, 2017

Algorithms are killing creativity, writes John Hegarty

Ultimately, brands are built by talking to a broad audience. Even if part of that audience never buys your product. Remember, a brand is made not just by the people who buy it, but also by the people who know about it. Fame adds value to a brand, but to build it involves saying something that captures the public’s imagination. It needs to broadcast.

Now, data are fundamentally important in the building of a market. “Big data” can provide intelligence, gather information, identify buying patterns and determine certain outcomes. But what it cannot do is create an emotional bond with the consumer. Data do not make magic. That is the job of persuasion. And it is what makes brands valuable...... Steve Jobs or James Dyson did not build brilliant companies by waiting for a set of algorithms to tell them what to do.

Persuasion and promotion.

In today’s advertising world, creativity has taken a back seat. Creativity creates value and with it difference. And difference is vital for giving a brand a competitive edge. But the growing belief in “data-only solutions” means we drive it out of the marketplace.

If everything ends up looking the same and feeling the same, markets stagnate.
advertising  Steve_Jobs  creativity  human_ingenuity  data  massive_data_sets  data_driven  brands  emotional_connections  persuasion  ingenuity  daring  algorithms 
february 2018 by jerryking
Terry's Strategy
After 22 years at Pirate Radio, the voice of the industry is moving on. What's he thinking?

THIS WON'T BE THE FIRST TIME TERRY O'REILLY HAS CHANGED tracks, and if history is any indication, he'll p...
Terry_O'Reilly  radio  CBC_Radio  marketing  advertising  persuasion 
september 2017 by jerryking
The lost art of political persuasion - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Apr. 25 2015

Talking points are hardly a 21st century political innovation. But they have so crowded out every other form of discourse that politics is now utterly devoid of honesty, unless it’s the result of human error. The candidates are still human, we think, though the techies now running campaigns are no doubt working on ways to remove that bug from their programs.

Intuition, ideas and passion used to matter in politics. Now, data analytics aims to turn all politicians into robots, programmed to deliver a script that has been scientifically tested...The data analysts have algorithms that tell them just what words resonate with just what voters and will coax them to donate, volunteer and vote.

Politics is no longer about the art of persuasion or about having an honest debate about what’s best for your country, province or city. It’s about microtargeting individuals who’ve already demonstrated by their Facebook posts or responses to telephone surveys that they are suggestible. Voters are data points to be manipulated, not citizens to be cultivated....Campaign strategists euphemistically refer to this data collection and microtargeting as “grassroots engagement” or “having one-on-one conversations” with voters....The data analysts on the 2012 Obama campaign came up with “scores” for each voter in its database, or what author Sasha Issenberg called “a new political currency that predicted the behaviour of individual humans.
Konrad_Yakabuski  persuasion  middle_class  politicians  massive_data_sets  political_campaigns  data_scientists  data_driven  data_mining  microtargeting  behavioural_targeting  politics  data  analytics  Campaign_2012 
april 2015 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  emotions  empathy  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms 
february 2014 by jerryking
To Persuade People, Tell Them a Story - WSJ.com
Nov. 9, 2013 | WSJ | By Dennis Nishi.

"Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire.

* Use far fewer slides. Use a lot more anecdotes
* Turn presentations into stories that your audience can relate to, instead of lecturing them on what needs changing.
* Judge performance on the quality of questions being asked and the quality of feedback received.
* Being an effective storyteller requires preparation.
* Move beyond facts and figures, which aren't as memorable as narratives, says Cliff Atkinson, author of "Beyond Bullet Points."
* Many people in business think raw data is persuasive. But when you're dealing with people from other departments and in different fields who don't understand how you got that data, you can lose them pretty quickly. * Step back and put yourself into their shoes and take them through the process of understanding," "Distill the most important facts and wrap them in an engaging story."
* Find ways to connect with your audience on an emotional level, Neuroscientists have discovered that most decisions—whether people realize it or not—are informed by emotional responses. Do legwork to find significant events in your audience's lives or your own that you can base your story on or use to reinforce your points.
* Insert anecdotes about taking care of a sick family member or a memorable customer story, says Mr. Smith, author of "Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire."
* Organize your story into three acts and starting by establishing context. You want to let your audience know who the main characters are, what the background of the story is, and what you'd like to accomplish by telling it, he says. Open, for example, by describing a department that's consistently failed to meet sales goals.
* Move on to how your main character—you or the company—fights to resolve the conflicts that create tension in the story. Success may require the main character to make additional capital investments or take on new training. Provide real-world examples and detail that can anchor the narrative, he advises.
* The ending should inspire a call to action, since you are allowing the audience to draw their own conclusions about your story versus just telling them what to do. Don't be afraid to use your own failures in support of your main points.
* Whatever you do, don't preface your story with an apology or ask permission to tell it. Be confident that your story has enough relevance to be told and just launch into it. Confidence and authority, he says, help to sell the idea to your audience.
storytelling  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  persuasion  books  P&G  howto  pitches  buy-in  large_companies  emotional_commitment  narratives  self-confidence  preparation  empathy  seminal_moments  contextual  think_threes  anecdotal 
november 2013 by jerryking
Meet Bloomberg's data-driven Daniel Doctoroff
Aug. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOANNA SLATER.

Mr. Doctoroff’s job, as deputy mayor for economic development, would include rebuilding the site and pushing ahead with projects envisaged in the Olympic bid....Founded by Mr. Bloomberg in 1982, the firm grew into a global juggernaut that disrupted every field it touched, from market data to financial journalism....Mr. Doctoroff had a yen for precision and a belief in the power of data. To eliminate clutter on his desk, he never touches a piece of paper twice. “I either delegate something, I dump it, or I deal with it,”...Mr. Doctoroff’s mission at Bloomberg is twofold. The first is to sell more terminals – a subscription service that costs more than $20,000 (U.S.) a year per person and offers access to an expanding universe of data, analytical tools and news. Last year was a tough one for terminal sales; Wall Street firms continued to shed staff in what Mr. Doctoroff describes as “the fourth year of post-financial crisis adjustment.”

The second task is to lead the company into other areas and make those investments pay off. Bloomberg has launched what it hopes will become indispensable data products for fields like law and government and also for back-office personnel within finance. Then there’s the media business, which includes a news service, television, radio and magazines, among them Bloomberg Businessweek, which was purchased in 2009. Businessweek still isn’t profitable, but it’s losing much less money than it used to. The magazine, like the rest of the news operation, serves another objective in the Bloomberg ecosystem, Mr. Doctoroff said: heightening the firm’s profile so it can attract more market-moving scoops, which in turn helps to sell more terminals....On his career path: I believe we’re all endowed with a very small set of narrow skills that make us unique. You’ve got to find what that is. Most often what you truly understand makes you unique is something that you’re also going to build passion around. For me – and I didn’t really discover this until I was in my 40s, the line that connected the dots … [is] seeing patterns in numbers that enable me to tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem. So whether it is helping a candidate get elected or doing a road show for a company, getting a project done in New York or hopefully setting a vision for a company, it’s that narrow skill.
New_York_City  Bloomberg  data_driven  precision  CEOs  organizational_culture  Wall_Street  private_equity  digital_media  disruption  privately_held_companies  Michael_Bloomberg  fin-tech  journalism  pattern_recognition  career_paths  gtd  mayoral  Daniel_Doctoroff  storytelling  product_launches  sense-making  leadership  insights  leaders  statistics  persuasion  ratios  analogies  back-office  connecting_the_dots  scoops  financial_journalism  financial_data  special_sauce  non-routine  skills 
august 2013 by jerryking
How to Think Big,
April 11, 2013 | Businessweek | by 'Titanic' Replica Builder Clive Palmer.

There are no barriers to having great ideas and thinking big. Whether rich or poor, privileged or disadvantaged, everybody is capable of changing their lives and the lives of others by thinking big. It takes imagination, courage, and the will to work hard. Don’t listen to the knockers and the critics, the naysayers and the negativity. To my knowledge, nobody ever built a monument to a critic. They come and go, but big ideas last forever. The great John F. Kennedy said words to this effect: “A man may die, nations may rise and fall, but an idea lives on.”

I’ve had my share of failures along the way, but they’ve only made me stronger and smarter and the successes all the more sweet. The secret to thinking big is capturing the imagination of the people. That’s where the power lies. It’s like harnessing the tide. If you can cultivate the right idea that resonates on an individual level, it will surge through the population like a wave. The best ideas are highly contagious. They can cross borders and cultures.
ideas  thinking  howto  storytelling  persuasion  virality  idea_generation  chutzpah  failure  individual_initiative  ideaviruses  moonshots  negativity_bias  imagination  courage  hard_work  thinking_big  JFK 
july 2013 by jerryking
How to draw attention to your great idea - The Globe and Mail
WALLACE IMMEN

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Aug. 30 2012
howto  Wallace_Immen  ideas  persuasion 
september 2012 by jerryking
Making Sense of Ambiguous Evidence
September 2008 | HBR | A Conversation with Documentary Filmmaker Errol Morris.

The information that top managers receive is rarely unfiltered. Unpopular opinions are censored. Partisan views are veiled as objective arguments. Honest mistakes are made. The manager is then left to sort it all out and come to a wise conclusion.

Few people know how to get an accurate read on a situation like documentarian Errol Morris. He is the award-winning director of such films as The Thin Blue Line and this year’s Standard Operating Procedure, an exploration of the elusive truth behind the infamous photographs taken at Abu Ghraib prison. The Guardian has ranked him among the world’s top 10 directors, crediting him with “a forensic mind” and “a painter’s eye.”

In this article, Morris talks with HBR’s Lisa Burrell about how he sorts through ambiguous evidence and contradictory views to arrive at the real story. “I don’t believe in the postmodern notion that there are different kinds of truth,” he says. “There is one objective reality, period.” Getting to it requires keeping your mind open to all kinds of evidence—not just the parts that fit with your first impressions or developing opinions—and, often, far more investigation than one would think.

If finding the truth is a matter of perseverance, convincing people of it is something of an art, one with which Morris has had much experience not only as a documentarian but also as a highly sought-after director of TV ads for companies like Apple, Citibank, Adidas, and Toyota. He holds up John Kerry’s 2004 bid for the U.S. presidency as a cautionary tale: Kerry struck voters as inauthentic when he emphasized only his military service and failed to account for his subsequent war protest. Morris would have liked to interview him speaking in his own words—natural, unscripted material—so that his humanity, which seemed to get lost in the campaign, could emerge.
anecdotal  HBR  executive_management  CEOs  contradictions  information  information_flows  evidence_based  information_gaps  authenticity  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  persuasion  forensics  postmodern  filmmakers  documentaries  judgment  cautionary_tales 
august 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  open-ended  persuasion  statistics  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  storytelling  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  Andrew_McAfee  numeracy  insights  sense-making  jobs  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
What's Your Story?
January 2005 | HBR | by Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback.

Ibarra and Lineback say that few people use storytelling to help them pursue their professional goals, and those who do, do so ineffectively. Tales of transition can easily have the elements of a good drama—a protagonist the listeners cares about, a catalyst inducing action, trials and tribulations, a turning point, and a resolution—but they also bring special challenges. One problem comes from minimizing the discontinuities involved, thereby making the person appear safe, dull, and unremarkable. This is a response to fearing that listeners, hearing about our change of direction, will doubt our commitment to the new professional goal.
HBR  storytelling  Herminia_Ibarra  Communicating_&_Connecting  protagonists  persuasion  discontinuities  narratives  transitions  turning_points 
april 2012 by jerryking
Excerpt: Buy-In: Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down
October 8, 2010 | BusinessWeek | In an edited excerpt from
their new book, John Kotter and Lorne Whitehead introduce a
counterintuitive approach to turning skeptics into advocates for your
new idea, plan, or proposal....The true buying-in of a new idea is about
winning over hearts and minds--it is an emotional commitment. The
single biggest challenge faced when obtaining buy-in for a good idea is
getting people's attention. Don't try to overcome attacks with tons of
data or logic. Instead, do what might seem to be the opposite. Keep
responses short and above all, RESPECTFUL. Goal is to "win" the thoughts
and feelings of the majority, not the 1 or 2 critics so watch the crowd
very carefully. Don't try to wing it, even if you know all the facts
thoroughly, even if the idea seems bulletproof, and even if you expect a
friendly audience. Preparation can significantly build confidence and
reduce anxiety.
excerpts  HBS  persuasion  John_Kotter  howto  ideas  books  Communicating_&_Connecting  pitches  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  attention  attention_spans  preparation  emotional_commitment  self-confidence  buy-in  counterintuitive  skeptics  the_single_most_important 
march 2011 by jerryking
How persuasive are you?
August 15, 2008 | Fortune Magazine | By Anne Fisher, senior writer
persuasion  Communicating_&_Connecting  pitches 
december 2010 by jerryking
Managing Yourself: How to Save Good Ideas
September 2010 | - Harvard Business Review | An Interview with
John P. Kotter by Jeff Kehoe. Why do so many good ideas generated by
well-intentioned, talented people fail? Because the audience is
comprised of human beings with anxieties, contrary opinions, and a
constant fear of losing face....large-scale organizational change
requires helping people to communicate, bringing them around to support
your vision, your strategy, your plan—and, in a smaller sense, just your
idea. It's an important element and we’re not very good at it. Getting
buy-in for good ideas is a basic human issue; it’s a life
skill....Kotter & Whitehead, suggest in their new book, Buy-In:
Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down, a counterintuitive
approach to gaining support: “inviting in the lions” to critique the
idea....anticipate being attacked when presenting a new idea, respond
with respectful using very short, simple, clear, communications filled
with common sense.
howto  HBR  John_Kotter  persuasion  pitches  Managing_Your_Career  Communicating_&_Connecting  large-scale  organizational_change  life_skills  implementation  failure  human_factor  human_frailties 
september 2010 by jerryking
Seven Hints for Selling Ideas
May 24, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | Rosabeth Moss
Kanter. 1. Seek many inputs. 2. Do your homework. 3. Make the
rounds. 4.See critics in private and hear them out. 5. Make the
benefits clear. 6. Be specific. 7. Show that you can deliver.
pitches  howto  HBR  persuasion  ideas  creating_valuable_content 
june 2010 by jerryking
Five Reasons Your Ideas Get Rejected - BusinessWeek
February 12, 2010 | Business Week | By Jeff Schmitt. How to
prevent your proposal from becoming a victim of circumstance or of your
own folly
ideas  failure  howto  rejections  proposals  pitches  Communicating_&_Connecting  persuasion  fallacies_follies 
february 2010 by jerryking
Cool it. Slow down. Don't buy the rhetoric
November 21, 2009 | globeandmail.com | by AVNER MANDELMAN.
The formal art of convincing others is called rhetoric. The Greek and
Romans used to teach it, as did the Jesuits, British law schools of old
and certain colleges in France. There is a variety of rhetorical styles -
Roman, Greek (which includes oratory), British, French, German - but
all are meant to do one thing: convince you and push you into action.
That topic of this column - a warning against letting yourself be
convinced without checking things yourself--due diligence.
Slow_Movement  rhetoric  logic_&_reasoning  Avner_Mandelman  investment_advice  due_diligence  persuasion  Greek  Romans  self-delusions 
november 2009 by jerryking
The Gripping Statistic : How to Make Your Data Matter
Mon Aug 10, 2009 | Fast Company | By Dan Heath & Chip
Heath. A good statistic is one that aids a decision or shapes an opinion. For a stat to do either of those, it must be dragged within the everyday (e.g. using ratios or useful analogies). That's your job -- to do the dragging. In our world of billions and trillions, that can be a lot of manual labor. But it's worth it: A number people can grasp is a number that can make a difference.
analogies  base_rates  Cisco  Communicating_&_Connecting  contextual  data  data_journalism  high-impact  mathematics  narratives  numeracy  persuasion  probabilities  ratios  statistics  storytelling  sense-making  value_creation 
september 2009 by jerryking
Radio is his medium, persuasion is his message - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 05, 2009| Globe & Mail | Jennifer Wells. Profile of
Terry O'Reilly and the genesis of his (PIRATE RADIO's) "Age of
Persuasion" broadcasts on CBC.
advertising  CBC_Radio  Terry_O'Reilly  radio  Jennifer_Wells  persuasion  ProQuest 
june 2009 by jerryking

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