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jerryking : physical_place   10

Da Vinci code: what the tech age can learn from Leonardo
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Ian Goldin.

While Leonardo is recognised principally for his artistic genius, barely a dozen paintings can be unequivocally attributed to him. In life, he defined himself not as an artist but as an engineer and architect......History does not repeat itself, but it rhymes. The Renaissance catapulted Italy from the Medieval age to become the most advanced place on Earth. Then, as now, change brought immense riches to some and growing anxiety and disillusionment to others. We too live in an age of accelerating change, one that has provoked its own fierce backlash. What lessons can we draw from Leonardo and his time to ensure that we not only benefit from a new flourishing, but that progress will be sustained? When we think of the Renaissance, we think of Florence. Leonardo arrived in the city in the mid 1460s, and as a teenager was apprenticed to the painter Verrocchio. The city was already an incubator for ideas. At the centre of the European wool trade, by the late 14th century Florence had become the home of wealthy merchants including the Medicis, who were bankers to the Papal Court. The city’s rapid advances were associated with the information and ideas revolution that defines the Renaissance. Johann Gutenberg had used moveable type to publish his Bible in the early 1450s, and between the time of Leonardo’s birth in 1452 and his 20th birthday, some 15m books were printed, more than all the European scribes had produced over the previous 1,500 years.

..as Leonardo knew, and the Silicon Valley techno-evangelists too often neglect, information revolutions don’t only allow good ideas to flourish. They also provide a platform for dangerous ideas. The Zuckerberg information revolution can pose a similar threat to that of Gutenberg.

In the battle of ideas, populists are able to mobilise the disaffected more effectively than cerebral scientists, decently disciplined innovators and the moderate and often silent majority. For progress to prevail, evidence-based, innovative and reasoned thinking must triumph.
.....Genius thrived in the Renaissance because of the supportive ecosystem that aided the creation and dissemination of knowledge — which then was crushed by the fearful inquisitions. Today, tolerance and evidence-based argument are again under threat.
accelerated_lifecycles  architecture  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  capitalization  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curiosity  dangerous_ideas  digital_economy  diversity  engineering  evidence_based  Florence  genius  globalization  human_potential  ideas  immigrants  Italy  industry_expertise  Johan_Gutenberg  lessons_learned  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Medicis  medieval  physical_place  polymaths  observations  Renaissance  Renaissance_Man  Silicon_Valley  silo_mentality  tolerance  unevenly_distributed  visionaries 
april 2019 by jerryking
Private Libraries That Inspire
April 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Katy McLaughlin.

Difficult to build and maintain, these elaborate spaces contain the passions and obsessions of their owners. Libraries That Inspire -- These spectacular rooms house the owners’ collections of books, antiques, art and ephemera representing their unique, life-long passions and interests.

Forget the Dewey Decimal System: Entrepreneur and inventor Jay Walker’s 25,000 books, manuscripts, artifacts and objects are organized in his personal 3,600-square-foot library “randomly, by color and height,” he said. When he walks into his library, part of his Ridgefield, Conn., home, the room automatically “wakes up,” glowing with theatrical lighting, music and LED-lit glass panels lining various walkways. He finds items to peruse by a system of memory, chance, and inspiration, he said.

The Walker Library of the History of the Human Imagination is a dramatic example of the rarest of residential amenities: A vast, personal, custom-built repository of intellectual stimuli. In the age of the e-reader, it is a status symbol on par with wearing a Patek Philippe watch when the cellphone already tells the time. For wealthy homeowners, personal libraries provide both a quiet refuge from the world and a playground for their minds—as well as a solution to the challenge of warehousing books from which they cannot bear to part......To create enough shelf space and to counteract the visual heaviness of walls lined with books, private libraries may aim for two or more open stories......The private library is a classic example of a highly personal amenity that is expensive for the builder of a dream home to create and hard to recoup upon resale. .......the library has stimulated new ideas that have translated into an array of inventions and helped him make many new friends.

For some private library owners, especially those who aspire to world-class book collections, the serious expenditure isn’t in the physical structure, but in the contents. “It is not uncommon for collectors at this level to be spending in excess of $1 million a year” on books ......
antiques  antiquities  art  bespoke  books  collectibles  collectors  curation  design  high_net_worth  ideas  inspiration  insurance  Katy_McLaughlin  life_long_learning  personal_libraries  physical_place  owners  passions  shelf_space  status_symbols  uniqueness 
april 2019 by jerryking
Imagining the Retail Store of the Future
APRIL 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By ELIZABETH PATON.

What will the store of the future look like? Gleaming robots using facial recognition technology to personalize sales pitches to mood or past spending preferences? Voice-activated personal assistants, downloading the availability, color and fit of any and every garment to your smartphone? 3-D printing stations? No checkout counters when you leave? Holographic product displays on the shop floor that change when a customer walks by? Virtual fitting rooms via virtual reality headsets? Drones dropping deliveries in the backyard or on the front steps?.......is this the sort of shopping experience that customers really want?
Scores of leading retailers and fashion brands increasingly say no.........Farfetch — the global online marketplace for independent luxury boutiques — held a daylong event at the Design Museum in London. There, in front of 200 fashion industry insiders and partners, José Neves, the founder of Farfetch, unveiled “The Store of the Future,” a suite of new technologies developed by his company to help brands and boutiques bridge the worlds of online and offline.......A report by Bain suggests that although 70 % of high-end purchases are influenced by online interactions, stores will continue to play a critical role, with 75 % of sales still occurring in a physical location by 2025.

What may change, however, is a store’s primary purpose. Forget e-commerce, or bricks and mortar, or even omnichannel sales; according to Mr. Neves, the new retail era is one anchored in “augmented retail,” a blend of the digital and physical allowing a shopper to shift seamlessly between the two realms.....Holition is an augmented-reality consultancy and software provider based in London that has worked with some well-known retail brands.......“The holy grail for retailers is creating digital empathy....No one knows what the future will look like....those using technology and data to create bespoke personalized shopping experiences...are more likely to come out on top.”.....boutiques and physical events remained vital “marketing opportunities,” with a more specialized inventory selection and the opportunity for customers to do more than buy merchandise......talks, film screenings and designer meet-and-greets, along with social media lessons, exercise classes and floristry sessions.......“Stores cannot just be row after row of product rail anymore,” he added. . “To survive, they have to tell stories — rooted in a sense of community and entertainment — and have points of view that makes the owner stand out.”.......“Ultimately the use of data to transform stores will separate those who make it to the next step and those who won’t.
reimagining  retailers  physical_place  shopping_malls  cashierless  e-commerce  reconceptualization  future  shopping_experience  brands  fashion  omnichannel  bricks-and-mortar  MatchesFashion  Holition  Yoox  facial-recognition 
february 2018 by jerryking
Being the best at something - Western Alumni
by Paul Wells, BA'89 May 6, 2014

It was at Western I learned that one of the options open to any ordinary kid was to be the best in the world at something. The “something” in question could be just about anything. That sense of a university as a community of achievement is yet another reason why the notion of a university as a physical place, a meeting place for thousands of young people and the ghosts of all who came before them, is nowhere close to being obsolete.
Paul_Wells  UWO  alumni  economists  music  best_of  Pablo_Picasso  physical_place  Colleges_&_Universities  meeting_place 
may 2014 by jerryking
Physical campus still counts in virtual world
Winter 2014 | Western Alumni | by Paul Wells, BA'89.

A campus isn’t just a luxury from an earlier and more genteel era, it’s starting to seem central to the work a university does. And Western’s lovelier-than-average campus is starting to look like a considerable competitive asset.....I don’t want to overstate the significance of all this. If a university offers a lousy education or does timid, incremental research, it doesn’t matter how fluffy the seat cushions are. Western’s real strengths are in its lecture halls and labs. But I was reminded how, despite its largely utilitarian function — the simultaneous education of tens of thousands of young people — Western remains a pleasant place to be. This matters because the traditional model of the university — a physical place where people convene in large numbers for extended stays to learn and exchange ideas — doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon.
Paul_Wells  UWO  Colleges_&_Universities  MOOCs  aesthetics  physical_place  shared_experiences  shared_consciousness 
january 2014 by jerryking
Snooping in the Age of E-book - This Life - NYTimes.com
September 23, 2011 |NYT| By BRUCE FEILER. How does one snoop
bookshelves in the age of e-book?...a bit of gumshoe in someone’s
cupboard or closet can reveal far more about them than an entire
evening’s worth of chitchat. “Places reflect long series of behavior,”
“If I have a conversation with you, I just get snippets of behavior.
Your books, your chairs, your wall hangings represent an accumulation
over many yrs. A space distills repeated acts. That’s why it’s hard to
fake.” …A perfect storm of clues is what makes bookshelf sleuthing so
appealing — and so difficult to replicate elsewhere in a home. “The
kitchen & pantry are pretty good,” …“But they don’t interest me as
much as a person’s bookshelf,” because the kitchen and pantry are
reflection of how the person eats, whereas the bookcase is reflection of
how he thinks.”… For all the benefits of snooping, the activity does
present certain ethical quandaries. Is it O.K. to look in someone’s
closet? Their medicine cabinet? Their iPad?
sleuthing  books  personal_libraries  e-books  artifacts  physical_place  primary_field_research  snooping 
september 2011 by jerryking
Turing was right: Don't be ruled by words and numbers
January 13, 2007 | Globe & Mail | by AVNER MANDELMAN.
Numbers alone aren't enough. You must seek out physical facts too,
because that's where the exclusive edge is. But if you have read this
column before, surely you know all this. So why am I mentioning it
again? Because when I interviewed analysts prior to hiring one, I found
that fresh MBAs or those with a CFA designation have never been taught
to do physical sleuthing. In fact the entire CFA material never mentions
physical investigation. It's all done by numbers and letters -- which
are, of course, reflections of reality, not physical reality itself.
The implicit assumption then is that screen blips and printed matter can
capture the full human drama of commercial conflict -- which, after
all, is what business truly is. But is this assumption valid? Can
letters and numbers alone tell you whether a company's president is
competent and trustworthy?
Avner_Mandelman  sleuthing  proprietary  due_diligence  scuttlebutt  physical_place  personal_knowledge 
february 2010 by jerryking
Conference to explore creativity in urban centres
Posted on 11/02/09 by JEFF GRAY.

In a partnership with the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto - headed by urban thinker Richard Florida - the city of Toronto will spend $10,000 on an international conference this June on "cultural mapping."

The conference, highlighted in yesterday's city budget, will be called Placing Creativity. It will include international cultural policy researchers and "explore the connection between place, creativity and the economy."

The event, billed in a budget document as a "major gathering of international thinkers," will focus on the geographic discipline of "cultural mapping," which looks at the way artists and art institutions cluster and the effect they have on neighbouring businesses.
creativity  Jeff_Gray  conferences  physical_place  spillover  ideacity  creative_types  urban  cultural_mapping  clusters  artists  cultural_institutions  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
february 2009 by jerryking

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