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jerryking : planning   21

Travel Agents? No. Travel ‘Designers’ Create Strategies, Not Trips. - The New York Times
By JOANNE KAUFMAN JULY 5, 2017

Affluent travelers are turning to travel designers, whose services go beyond booking trips to managing travel portfolios.....a subset of travel planners — they prefer the term travel designers — who do far more than simply book trips. They manage the travel portfolios of their affluent clients, mapping out a schedule that might, over a year, include mother-daughter weekends in the Caribbean, father-son heli-skiing, a romantic husband-and-wife weekend getaway and an elaborate summer trip for the whole family.....A high level of planning and involvement “is part of an emerging market where there are people who have more money than time and want expertise,” ..... For example, he said, “a traditional travel agent wouldn’t know to ask questions like ‘what’s the smallest plane you’d be willing to fly on?’”

Such clients,...may not be price sensitive, but are highly sensitive to perceived slights. “Someone I know professionally,” he said, “went on a trip to a remote location and was served frozen orange juice, and told me he would never use his travel designer again because he expected fresh juice.”

Often, long-range planning is a practical necessity. Some of the most sought-after lodges and boutique hotels have limited space.....my own take, a caveat, is that it is unclear whether the degree of planning involved leaves room for serendipity (See Add Uncertainty to Your Financial Plans - NYTimes.com)
affluence  boutique_hotels  concierge_services  curation  detail_oriented  high_net_worth  high-touch  hospitality  hotels  itineraries  long-range  luxury  planning  portfolio_management  serendipity  travel  travel_agents  uncertainty 
july 2017 by jerryking
Don’t blame the flu for ER congestion - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 06 2015,

Our emergency rooms are overflowing because of bad planning and misplaced priorities....Influenza is one of the most common and predictable infectious diseases on Earth. In Canada, it spreads from west to east and peaks at roughly the same time each year, near the end of December or early January.

Just as predictably, hospital ERs are besieged, most notably during the Christmas to New Year’s period.

There is more illness in the winter – not just flu, but gastroenteritis, colds and other pathogens spread by coughing and sneezing in close quarters....The larger issue is that our health system does nothing to anticipate and adjust to these problems. On the contrary, it is irresponsibly inflexible.

During the holiday season, retail outlets extend their hours, add additional staff, stock more supplies, and so on. All sensible stuff – Planning 101, if you will – designed to make life easier for the consumer.

Hospitals, and the health system more generally, do the opposite: During the holiday season, they reduce or close a range of services, from hospital beds to primary care clinics, and funnel patients to jam-packed emergency rooms.
adjustments  André_Picard  anticipating  community_care  congestion  emergency_rooms  flu_outbreaks  pathogens  planning  primary-care  healthcare  home_care  hospitals  inflexibility  influenza  overcapacity  overflow 
january 2015 by jerryking
Football's Secret Strategies - WSJ.com
Nov. 29, 2013 | | By Nicholas Dawidoff.

Fans of professional football are used to seeing NFL coaches on the sidelines holding what look like enormous bistro menus in front of their faces. These are "call sheets" for plays, distilled from the week's game plan, and they summarize the tactical choices on which NFL games depend. Because everything in a game plan is a closely guarded secret, most football fans have no real idea what they are watching as coaches and players, communicating through headsets or face to face, share this privileged information.... It was a life of perpetual meetings. Through winter, spring and summer, the coaches pored over film of practices and games, working through the actions of every Jets player and opponent in every play of the previous season, trying to understand why ideas succeeded or failed.

Come fall, the assistant coaches would scour the coming opponent's recent games on film and supply the offensive or defensive coordinator with their thoughts. The advance-scouting department would compile an opposition research dossier for the coaches thick enough that some called it "War and Peace." Teams that had recently beaten the Jets' next opponent were scrutinized; elements of their successful plays might be adapted or lifted outright.
NFL  strategic_thinking  coaching  strategies  secrets  preparation  planning  football  ideas  competitive_intelligence  sleuthing  scouting 
december 2013 by jerryking
How to Plan for a Successful Retirement: Think Slow - WSJ.com
April 9, 2012 | WSJ | By DIANE COLE
So Much for Snap Decisions
A Nobel Prize winner explains why one secret to a successful retirement is to think 'slow'

the message that Daniel Kahneman, psychologist and Nobel Prize winner, delivers in his new book, "Thinking, Fast and Slow."

Typically, he says, people rely on blink-of-an-eye judgments, driven by emotion and impulse, in navigating life—even when we should be thinking "slow," using reason, deliberation and logic to weigh our options.

WSJ: In your book, you discuss overconfidence as a common pitfall. What impact does that have?

MR. KAHNEMAN: Overconfidence is everywhere. We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs. We just think they are biased.

When optimism and overconfidence come together, you get many mistakes. Optimistic estimates can in retrospect seem almost delusional. One example is that people end up paying about twice as much as they originally expected to pay for kitchen renovations.

DANIEL KAHNEMAN: 'We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs.'
DANIEL KAHNEMAN: 'We all have clear and certain beliefs, and our certainty is not impaired by the fact that other people hold contradictory beliefs.' JON ROEMER
WSJ: Is there a way to keep our self-certainty from blocking out other evidence?

MR. KAHNEMAN: You can imagine yourself trying to make the case for your belief before a skeptical judge.

It is even better to try to construct the best possible case against your own position, because searching for arguments that support your position is unlikely to lead you to correct your mistakes.
book_reviews  decision_making  retirement  howto  personal_finance  planning  financial_planning  Daniel_Kahneman  gut_feelings  optimism  overconfidence  thinking_deliberatively  Nobel_Prizes  self-certainty 
may 2012 by jerryking
The business case for beautiful libraries - The Globe and Mail
LISA ROCHON | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 10, 2012
culture  libraries  planning  case_studies  Lisa_Rochon  architecture 
february 2012 by jerryking
The 15 Minutes that Could Save Five Years
June 16, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | by Michael Schrage.
We're facing the end of retirement as we know it — an emerging
unpleasant reality that will (re)shape the quality of life and standard
of living for billions. we all need to start dealing with it.
Now....Forget the "saving for retirement" shibboleths. Strategically
addressing those 60+ months after age 65 may be the most significant
long-range planning investment in your human capital portfolio....Who
are the 70+ year olds whose presence, energy, and effectiveness might
profitably serve as the benchmarks for your own?
invest_in_yourself  Michael_Schrage  retirement  HBR  personal_finance  aging  human_capital  role_models  Kauffman_Foundation  Zoomers  long-term  shibboleths  savings  planning  myths  strategic_thinking  JCK  endgame  Second_Acts  long-range 
june 2010 by jerryking
For Many Entrepreneurs, Running the Show is Stressful - WSJ.com
JANUARY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by COLLEEN DEBAISE.
Work-related pressure can lead to a host of stress-induced problems:
headaches, sleepless nights, irritability, weight gain and lost
productivity, among others. The best method of combating
business-related stress is to plan. Entrepreneurs who haven't updated or
assembled their business plan (for more on business plans, click here)
can feel directionless, inefficient and overwhelmed— all of which
contribute to stress. Writing out even a simple plan can prevent
overload while also providing a viable road map to success.
small_business  planning  business_planning  overwhelmed  directionless  inefficiencies  roadmaps  stressful 
january 2010 by jerryking
Toronto congestion costs Canada $3.3-billion: OECD
Nov. 19, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | by Brodie Fenlon. More
should be done to capitalize on immigrants' international networks in
order to expand Canada's global trade. Cities outside Toronto need to
increase investment in affordable and rental housing that serves
newcomers.
OECD  Toronto  congestion  transit  transportation  planning  immigrants  traffic_congestion 
december 2009 by jerryking
Planning for profit
Mid-Mar 2000 | Professional Builder Vol. 65, Iss. 4; pg. 59, 2
pgs | by Tom Stephani . Simply defined, profit is payment for risks
taken, capital invested, and liability exposure. Sadly, far too many
small volume and custom builders operate as non-profit businesses. In
order to make a net profit in the home building business, builders must
define profit, plan for profit, and have systems in place to measure it.
Profit is the most important component of the gross margin that you
apply to every construction project that you sell. Profit is over and
above any salary benefits the owner is paid for the day-to-day operation
of the business. Often, smaller builders assume that profit is what is
left over after paying all of the bills. Determine what your profit goal
is first, and then work the numbers to determine what gross margin you
must achieve at a realistic sales level.
profits  planning  profitability  profit_dynamic  measurements  small_business 
december 2009 by jerryking
Calculated Leaps of Faith - Associations Now Magazine - Publications and Resources - ASAE & The Center for Association Leadership
October 2006 | ASSOCIATIONS NOW | By: Angela Hickman Brady

An organization's capacity for risk taking may determine whether it
succeeds or fails. Part game of chance, part discipline, the willingness
to shake off the status quo can change your association for the better.
innovation  change  strategy  business  associations  CARP  leaps_of_faith  planning  organizational_capacity  risk-taking 
may 2009 by jerryking
Wachovia Aims to Nab Bigger Slice Of Retirement-Planning Market
Oct 18, 2006. Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y. by Victoria Knight.
high_net_worth  retirement  planning  tools  Wachovia 
february 2009 by jerryking
You've Raised the Children; Time for a Job? - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 19, 2009 WSJ column By NEAL TEMPLIN. Focuses on options about returning to the workforce.
Managing_Your_Career  career  job_search  planning  Second_Acts  retirement  baby_boomers 
february 2009 by jerryking
Innovation In Its Place - Forbes.com
01.13.09 | Forbes Magazine | by Dane Stangler

Cities prosper through spontaneous enterprise, not top-down planning.
cities  economic_development  strategy  spontaneity  planning  Dane_Stangler  San_Antonio  top-down 
february 2009 by jerryking

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