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jerryking : plant-based   27

A Milk Giant Goes Broke as Americans Reject Old Staples
Nov. 13, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Yaffe-Bellany.

Saddled with debt and struggling to adjust to changing consumer habits, Dean Foods filed for bankruptcy protection on Tuesday, signaling another grim chapter in the recent struggles of the dairy industry. The company, whose portfolio of brands includes TruMoo and Lehigh Valley, said it was in talks to sell itself to Dairy Farmers of America, a marketing cooperative that sells milk from thousands of farms.

Across the food and beverage industry, the challenges facing Dean Foods are becoming increasingly familiar. In recent years, consumers have moved away from brands, and even entire categories of food, once seen as household staples. The decline of the milk industry has emerged as a particularly stark example of how these changing tastes are challenging major companies whose products once crowded store shelves.
bankruptcies  Big_Food  CPG  dairy  Danone  Dean_Foods  grocery  Kraft_Heinz  plant-based  private_labels  shifting_tastes  spin-offs  supermarkets  Target  Wal-Mart  yogurt 
november 2019 by jerryking
Does oat milk stack up nutritionally to other non-dairy milks?
September 30, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by LESLIE BECK

Read labels to know what your plant-based beverage provides and what it doesn’t.

If you’re replacing dairy in your diet, consider protein. Soy and pea milks have the most, followed by oat milk.

To get a vitamin and mineral content that is similar to cow’s milk, choose a fortified product (most are). If it’s fortified, the nutrition label will state a daily value of 25 to 30 per cent for calcium.

Avoid added sugars by opting for an unsweetened milk alternative.

While non-dairy milks provide nutrition, keep in mind that they are processed foods.

To get the most nutrients, along with plenty of disease-fighting natural plant compounds, include the original whole foods – e.g. oatmeal, cashews, almonds, hemp seeds, edamame, tofu, dried peas – in your regular diet.
beverages  Leslie_Beck  nondairy  nutrition  plant-based 
october 2019 by jerryking
Is Pea Milk a Healthy Drink or Just a Hell No?
July 10, 2016 | GQ | BY JEFF VRABEL.
Ripple

Original: Creamier than regular 2% milk, enough so that I instantly thought about repurposing it as coffee creamer (especially because creamers are made from like 95% melted tire rubber). There's a kind of tangy, flat aftertaste, but that might also be the case with 2% milk and I'm just used to it. If they could make regular peas taste more like this, I'd consider eating some.

Original Unsweetened: Original has half the sugar of regular milk. This version has no sugar at all, and it shows. Without sugar, the taste is flatter and chalkier. I'm two sips in and wondering if I have the journalistic drive to attempt a third. Okay, I tried a third and it was a bad decision. I miss you, sugar. I miss you so much.

Vanilla: After the joyless slog of the Unsweetened, Vanilla is like a fireworks show. It's sweet and lovely and creeping into the neighborhood of a milkshake, almost enough that a whole glass might get a little heavy in your gut-parts. Still, the best flavor of the batch.

Chocolate: Not good. Tastes somehow plant-y. If you want to drink chocolate milk, you do not want a milk alternative. Just commit to your sin and plop a couple spoonfuls of Hershey's into a glass of real milk. Or drink the sludge that's left over when you're finished with a bowl of Cocoa Pebbles: part chocolate milk, part floating liquefied rice footballs, all phenomenal. If you've decided on chocolate milk, you don't want be jerking around with plant-based anything.
beverages  nondairy  plant-based  Ripple 
october 2019 by jerryking
Plant-based ‘meat’ craze drives demand for yellow peas
JULY 3, 2019 | Financial Times | by Emiko Terazono.

The soaring popularity of plant-based meat substitutes has shone a spotlight on a new star ingredient: the humble pea.....From Beyond Meat, which has seen its shares rocket after a flotation in May, to US meat producer Tyson and Nestlé of Switzerland, food companies are turning to protein from the yellow pea as the key ingredient for plant-based foods including burgers, bacon, tuna and yoghurt...The rush to introduce products amid a spike in demand from consumers has led to a scramble to secure supplies. The squeeze has not been caused by the availability of the yellow pea itself — which is plentiful, boosted by Chinese curbs on Canadian imports in the wake of the Huawei row, and a move by India to place tariffs on pulses — but a lack of processing capacity to produce the protein powder extracted from the legume. Producers have simply not kept pace........companies are received just 25% of their pea-protein orders as suppliers diverted the shipment to other buyers....in the face of increased demand....locking down supplies had been front of mind. “We’ve started building up a stockpile. Everyone else is doing it as well.”....Yellow peas, a pulse or dry edible seed that is part of the legume family alongside soyabeans, lentils and chickpeas, have become the protein source of choice for many food companies as consumers are turning away from soyabeans......there is no exchange-based market for pea protein isolate and prices are hard to track,... demand is so strong that buyers have struggled to secure long-term supply deals. “For companies that want to lock in prices for the remainder of 2019 and 2020, there is reluctance from their suppliers to guarantee higher quantities at lower prices,”...Beyond Meat has signed a three-year contract for its pea protein with Puris, adding to a supply agreement with Roquette, which expires at the end of the year. .....Ripple Foods, a California start-up that produces pea-protein based milk, has seen sales double every year since it launched in 2016. The company, which counts Goldman Sachs among its investors, contracts farmers to grow yellow peas and then processes its own pea protein. That insulates Ripple from price swings.....taking Ripple out of the pea protein market...An increasing number of food and ingredient companies have invested in the pea protein sector over the past few years. Cargill.... backed Puris at the start of last year, putting in $25m and launching a joint venture.

New plants to produce pea protein are expected to get up and running over the next year. Roquette is building a processing plant in Manitoba, Canada, while Verdient Foods of Saskatchewan, a plant protein group backed by James Cameron, the Oscar-winning director of the film Titanic, is also planning new capacity.

.
Beyond_Meat  Big_Food  Cargill  food_tech  legumes  Nestlé  plant-based  pulses  Puris  proteins  Ripple  Roquette  soybeans  stockpiles  supply_chains  supply_chain_squeeze  Tyson  Verdient 
july 2019 by jerryking
Cashew foie gras? Big Food jumps on ‘plant-based’ bandwagon
MAY 18, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud in Paris and Emiko Terazono in London

* Boom in meat and dairy substitutes sets up ‘battle for the centre of the plate’
* Nestlé recently launched the Garden Gourmet's Incredible burger in Europe and plans to launch it in the US in the autumn in conjunction with McDonald’s.
* Burger King has partnered with a “foodtech” start-up to put meat-free burgers on their menu.
* Pret A Manger is considering a surge in its roll-out of vegetarian outlets as it looks into buying UK sandwich rival Eat.

A change is afoot that is set to sweep through the global food industry as once-niche dietary movements (i.e. vegetarians, then the vegans, followed by a bewildering array of food tribes from veggievores, flexitarians and meat reducers to pescatarians and lacto-vegetarians ) join the mainstream.

At the other end of the supply chain, Big Food is getting in on the act as the emergence of plant-based substitutes opens the door for meat market disruption. Potentially a huge opportunity if the imitation meat matches adoption levels of milk product alternatives such as soy yoghurt and almond milk, which account for 13% of the American dairy market. It is a $35bn opportunity in the US alone, according to newly listed producer Beyond Meat, given the country’s $270bn market for animal-based food. 

Packaged food producers, burdened with anaemic growth in segments from drinks to sweets, have jumped on the plant-based bandwagon. Market leaders including Danone, Nestlé and Unilever are investing heavily in acquisitions and internal product development.

Laggards are dipping their toes. Kraft-Heinz, for example, is investing in start-ups via its corporate venture capital arm and making vegan variants of some of its products. Even traditional meat producers, such as US-based Tyson Foods and Canada’s Maple Leaf Foods, are diversifying into plant-based offerings to remain relevant with consumers.......“Plant-based is not a threat,” said Wayne England, who leads Nestlé’s food strategy. “On the contrary, it’s a great opportunity for us. Many of our existing brands can play much more in this space than they do today, so we’re accelerating that shift, and there is also space for new brands.” .....a plethora of alternative protein products are hitting supermarket shelves... appealing to consumers for different reasons....(1) reducing meat consumption for health reasons... (2) others concerned about animal welfare...(3) concern over agriculture’s contribution to climate change......As Big Food rushes in, it faces stiff competition from a new breed of start-ups that have raced ahead to launch plant-based meats they claim look, taste and feel like the real thing. Flush with venture capital funding, they have turned to technology, analysing the molecular structure of foods and seeking to reverse-engineer versions using plant proteins......Not only are the disrupters innovating on the product side, they are rapidly creating new brands using digital marketing and partnerships with restaurants. Big food companies, which can struggle to create new brands, often rely on acquisitions to bring new ones onboard.....Aside from the quality of the new protein substitutes, how they are marketed will determine whether they become truly mass-market or remain limited to the margins of motivated vegetarians and vegans. The positioning of the product in stores influences sales, with new brands such as Beyond Meat pushing to be placed in the meat section rather than separate chilled cabinets alongside the vegetarian and vegan options.....Elio Leoni Sceti, whose investment company recently backed NotCo, a Chile-based start-up that uses machine learning to create vegetarian replicas of meat and dairy, believes new brands have an edge on the marketing side because they are not held back by old habits. 

“The new consumer looks at the consequences of consumption and believes that health and beauty come from within,” said one industry veteran who used to run Birds Eye owner Iglo. “They’re less convinced by the functional-based arguments that food companies are used to making, like less sugar or fewer calories. This is not the way that consumers used to make decisions so the old guard are flummoxed.”...Dan Curtin, who heads Greenleaf, the Maple Leaf Food's plant-based business, played down the idea that alternative meats will eat into meat sales, saying the substitutes were “additive”. “We don’t see this as a replacement. People want options,” he said. 

 
animal-based  Beyond_Meat  Big_Food  brands  Burger_King  CPG  Danone  diets  digital_strategies  food_tech  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  Kraft_Heinz  laggards  Maple_Leaf_Foods  McDonald's  meat  Nestlé  new_products  plant-based  rollouts  shifting_tastes  start_ups  tribes  Unilever  vegetarian  vc  venture_capital 
may 2019 by jerryking
This is nut loaf, will Beyond Meat crash? | FT Alphaville
9 HOURS AGO By: Jamie Powell

Beyond Meat is the only pure-play plant-based protein company listed.
Beyond_Meat  green  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  IPOs  new_products  plant-based  pure-plays  shifting_tastes  Tyson  vegetarian 
may 2019 by jerryking
The Impossible mission — to save the planet with a burger
April 5, 2019 | Financial Times Emiko Terazono and Tim Bradshaw in London.

Impossible Foods discovered that “heme”, an iron-containing protein molecule present in plants and animals, was the magic ingredient giving meat its aroma, taste and texture. Heme, produced through genetic engineering and yeast fermentation, is also behind the “juices” that make the Impossible burger bleed... In 2019, the company has introduced a new and improved burger after swapping wheat for soyabeans and using less salt. After signing its distribution deal with Burger King it is fundraising to increase the capacity of its production facility in Oakland, California.

Along with rival Beyond Meat, which is preparing to float in the US, Impossible has sought to lure meat-eating consumers who want to reduce their meat intake or are looking for tasty options, casting the net wider than vegans....... Pat Brown , 64-year-old former professor of biochemistry, is the founder of Impossible. ..Mr Brown seems to have slipped into his role as an entrepreneur with ease. He told investors that if they backed him, he was going to make them “insanely rich”.

His pronouncements that he was not bothered about exits have been perceived as arrogance by some venture capitalists. However he has still raised more than $475m since 2011 and attracted plenty of other backers, including Viking Global, Bill Gates, and Li Ka-shing’s Horizons Ventures. Investors hope the latest fundraising will value the company at more than $1bn.

Bruce Friedrich, who launched the Good Food Institute, a US not-for-profit that promotes alternative proteins and advises start-ups, calls Mr Brown “a prophet” and praises his “infectious optimism”....If the Impossible burger is successful, Mr Brown hopes to eliminate animal meat in the food chain by 2035, helping the earth to restore its vegetation cover.
Beyond_Meat  green  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  Kholsa_Ventures  plant-based  prophets  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  vegetarian 
april 2019 by jerryking
Jeff Bezos’ family office invests in Chilean plant-based food start-up
March 1, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud in Paris.

The family office of Jeff Bezos is among the investors in a $30m funding round for a Chile-based start-up that uses machine learning to create vegetarian alternatives for animal-derived products such as mayonnaise and ice cream.

Four-year old NotCo on Friday announced the financing round led by The Craftory, a fund co-founded by consumer industry veteran Elio Leoni Sceti, as well as Bezos Expeditions.....The funds will be used to finance product development and help NotCo expand to Mexico and the US later this year. It sells its plant-based mayonnaise, which is made with chickpeas, in grocery stores in Chile......NotCo has developed a software platform that analyses the molecular structure of foods, such as beef or milk, so as then to derive combinations of plant-based alternatives that most closely resemble the original in taste, colour, and texture. The technology seeks to map the similarities between the genetic properties of plants and their corollaries in animals, so as to more accurately mimic the properties.....“The potential is massive because NotCo is not just a meat-replacement company or a milk-replacement company,”.....The technology can be applied to all foods derived from animals,” he said, adding that if successful, the opportunity was there to create a major food company to compete with the likes of Nestlé and Danone......the approach of analysing the molecular structure of foods to engineer vegetarian versions of meats, cheeses and dairy products is similar to that of US-based start-up Just Inc, formerly known as Hampton Creek.....The company changed its name after a series of setbacks, including an alleged food safety issue that led to it losing distribution at retailer Target. Nevertheless, Just Inc is well-funded; it has said that it has raised $220m from investors.....Venture capital investors have been pouring money into start-ups to create plant-based or lab-grown alternatives to traditional meat and dairy. Impossible Foods — which is backed by Bill Gates and Alphabet’s GV, formerly Google Ventures, among others — has raised $387.5m,
Chile  Chileans  Danone  family_office  flexitarian  food  Jeff_Bezos  machine_learning  Nestlé  plant-based  start_ups  vegetarian  vc  venture_capital 
march 2019 by jerryking
Tyson Made Its Fortune Packing Meat. Now It Wants to Sell You Frittatas.
Feb. 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Jacob Bunge

Tyson’s strategy is to transform the 84-year-old meatpacking giant into a modern food company selling branded consumer goods on par with Kraft Heinz Co. or Coca-Cola Co.
.....Tyson wants to be big in more-profitable prepared and packaged foods to distance itself from the traditional meat business’s boom-and-bust cycles. America’s biggest supplier of meat wants to also be known for selling packaged foods........How’s the transformation going? Amid an historic meat glut, the company’s shares are worth $4.9 billion less than they were a year ago—and are still valued like those of a meatpacker pumping out shrink-wrapped packs of pork chops and chicken breasts....Investors say the initiatives aren’t yet enough to counteract the steep challenges facing the poultry and livestock slaughtering and processing operations that have been the company’s core since....1935.....Record red meat and poultry production nationwide is pushing down prices and eroding Tyson’s meat-processing profit margins. Tariffs and trade barriers to U.S. meat have further dented prices and built up backlogs, while transport and labor costs have climbed. .......The packaged-foods business is itself struggling with consumers gravitating toward nimbler upstart brands and demanding natural ingredients and healthier recipes........Tyson's acquisition of Hillside triggered changes, including the onboarding of executives attuned to consumer trends. Tyson added managers from Fortune 100 companies, including Boeing Co. and HP Inc., who replaced some meat-processing officials who led Tyson for decades. The newcomers brought experience managing brands, understanding consumers, developing new products and building new technology tools, areas Tyson deemed central to its future......A chief sustainability officer, a newly created position, began working to shift Tyson’s image among environmental groups, .....Shifting consumer tastes have created hurdles for other packaged-food giants, such as Campbell Soup Co. and Kellogg Co. .... the meat business remains Tyson’s biggest challenge. In 2018 a flood of cheap beef, fueled by enlarged cattle herds, spurred a summer of “burger wars,” meat industry officials said. .......investment in brands and packaged foods hasn’t insulated Tyson’s business from these commodity-market swings. ........The company is also trying to improve its ability for forecast meat demand..........developing artificial intelligence to help Tyson better predict the future.........Scott Spradley, who left HP in 2017 to become Tyson’s CTO, said company data scientists are crunching numbers on major U.S. metropolitan areas. By analyzing historic meat consumption alongside demographic shifts, the number of residents moving in and out, and the frequency of birthdays and baseball games, Mr. Spradley said Tyson is building computer models that will help plan production and sales for its meat business. The effort aims to find patterns in data that Tyson’s human economists and current projections might not see. ......Deep data dives helped steer Tyson toward what executives say will be one of its biggest new product launches: plant-based replacements for traditional meat,
Big_Food  brands  Coca-Cola  CPG  cured_and_smoked  data_scientists  forecasting  Kraft_Heinz  meat  new_products  plant-based  predictive_modeling  prepared_meals  reinvention  shifting_tastes  stockpiles  strategy  sustainability  tariffs  Tyson 
february 2019 by jerryking
Oat milk sales surge as more consumers go dairy-free
December 23, 2018 | Financial Times | by Emiko Terazono in London.
beverages  nondairy  plant-based 
december 2018 by jerryking
Benevolent Bacon? Nestle And Unilever Gobble Up Niche Brands - WSJ
By Saabira Chaudhuri
Sept. 7, 2017

The global packaged-food industry is facing fierce competition from a burgeoning number of small, but high-growth food and beverage brands. These brands have struck a chord with consumers looking for locally produced or more healthy, natural choices.

Amid this shift, sales from traditional players have flagged, spurring consolidation, cost cutting and restructuring.

Unilever fended off an unsolicited takeover by Kraft Heinz Co. earlier this year. Activist investor Dan Loeb’s Third Point hedge fund in June disclosed a major stake in Nestlé, calling for changes in strategy to improve shareholder returns. In response, the two consumer-goods firms have focused on cost cutting and promises to boost dividends, while going on the hunt for nimbler food and beverage brands with the potential to accelerate growth.

‘We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins.’
—Nestlé USA Chief Executive Paul Grimwood
Nestlé’s deal to buy Sweet Earth comes less than three months after it bought a stake in subscription-meals company Freshly, which sells healthy, prepared meals to consumers across the U.S.

Moss Landing, Calif.-based Sweet Earth bills itself as a natural, ethical, environmentally conscious company that substitutes plant proteins for animal ones in meals like curries, stir fries, breakfast wraps, burgers and pasta. Founded in 2011, Sweet Earth is available in more than 10,000 stores in the U.S. It is stocked at independent natural grocers, as well as bigger chains like Amazon.com Inc.’s Whole Foods, Target Corp. , Kroger Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

“We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins,” said Paul Grimwood, chief executive of Nestlé’s U.S. arm. Plant-based food, as a sector, is growing at double-digit percentages rates, Nestlé said.
Big_Food  brands  CPG  emotional_connections  Unilever  niches  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Nestlé  shifting_tastes  start_ups  large_companies  Fortune_500  plant-based  healthy_lifestyles  high-growth  gazelles 
september 2017 by jerryking
Vegan Ice Cream Enters a Golden Age
JULY 21, 2017 | The New York Times | By MELISSA CLARK.

Supermarket shelves are now filled with quarts of plant-based milks. Cashew, hazelnut, macadamia, oat, flax, rice, quinoa and hemp varieties have joined the ranks of coconut, soy and almond milks. On a trip to France this summer, I even sampled chestnut milk, and I am still kicking myself for not buying an extra suitcase to haul home containers of the sweet, gentle elixir.

But with so many options, which plant-based milk, or combination of milks, makes the best homemade nondairy ice cream?.....With its high fat content and creamy texture, coconut milk (or, better still, coconut cream) is a great substitute for dairy. The downside is that the coconut milk has a pronounced coconut flavor, even when it is blended with intense ingredients like chocolate, peanut butter or raspberry.If you don’t mind the flavor, coconut cream is a great way to go. GoodPop, a company in Austin, Tex., producing both dairy and nondairy ice cream pops, uses coconut milk and cream in all its bases.
nondairy  ice_cream  vegan  GoodPop  plant-based  golden_age 
august 2017 by jerryking
Impossible Burger’s ‘Secret Sauce’ Highlights Challenges of Food Tech
AUG. 8, 2017 | The New York Times | By STEPHANIE STROM.

food is not an app. It is far more heavily regulated by governments and much more heavily freighted with cultural and emotional baggage.

“This rush to market is the Silicon Valley mind-set,” said Michael Hansen, a food safety expert who is the senior staff scientist at Consumers Union, an advocacy group. “They think because they’re doing something disruptive, the regulations that apply to other companies don’t apply to them.”

For now, few food start-ups are selling products to consumers. Only Beyond Meat, which uses a traditional pea protein to make its Beyond Burger; Hampton Creek, which makes plant-based sandwich spreads and salad dressings; and Impossible Foods have any notable presence in the market.
food_safety  vegetarian  FDA  Beyond_Meat  Impossible_Foods  plant-based  Hampton_Creek  special_sauce 
august 2017 by jerryking
There Is Coconut Everywhere - WSJ
By ANNE MARIE CHAKER
March 27, 2017 1

Coconut is in everything. Packaged soups, baby foods and snack foods are made with coconut oil, flour and shavings. Gyms are stocking coconut water. For some, coconut oil is a substitute for butter on popcorn, and coffee shops are spooning it liberally in blended lattés.

The flavorful ingredient went from a garnish on a cake to a base in foods in part because consumers no longer worry about its fat content. It is also increasingly promoted as healthful: Coconut sugar has a lower glycemic index than ordinary sugar, nutritionists say, meaning it can cause blood sugar to spike less, which may help stave hunger. Consumers seek such plant-based foods because they can help them stick to popular diets, such as dairy-free or gluten-free.
coconuts  plant-based 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why the man who brought us the glycemic index wants us to go vegan -
Feb. 22 2015 | The Globe and Mail |LESLIE BECK

If it were up to Dr. David Jenkins, he would have us all give up meat, fish and dairy and embrace veganism. And not just for our individual health...A properly planned plant-based diet – one that avoids all animal products, including meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy – is incredibly good for your health. Studies have shown plant-based eaters are thinner and have lower cholesterol and blood-pressure levels, a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and lower cancer rates – especially colorectal cancer. Foods such as beans and lentils, nuts, whole grains, fruits and vegetables offer a wealth of nutrients, fibre and phytochemicals that have favourable health effects. And vegan diets are usually higher in fibre, magnesium, folate, vitamins C and E, iron and phytochemicals, while tending to be lower in calories, saturated fat and cholesterol.
Leslie_Beck  glycemic_index  diets  vegetarian  mens'_health  plant-based 
february 2015 by jerryking
Yes, Healthful Fast Food Is Possible. But Edible?
April 3, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By MARK BITTMAN

After the success of companies like Whole Foods, and healthful (or theoretically healthful) brands like Annie’s and Kashi, there’s now a market for a fast-food chain that’s not only healthful itself, but vegetarian-friendly, sustainable and even humane. And, this being fast food: cheap. “It is significant, and I do believe it is coming from consumer desire to have choices and more balance,” says Andy Barish, a restaurant analyst at Jefferies LLC, the investment bank. “And it’s not just the coasts anymore.” ...What I’d like is a place that serves only good options, where you don’t have to resist the junk food to order well, and where the food is real — by which I mean dishes that generally contain few ingredients and are recognizable to everyone, not just food technologists....In recent years, the fast-food industry has started to heed these new demands. Billions of dollars have been invested in more healthful fast-food options, and the financial incentives justify these expenditures. About half of all the money spent on food in the United States is for meals eaten outside the home. And last year McDonald’s earned $5.5 billion in profits on $88 billion in sales. If a competitor offered a more healthful option that was able to capture just a single percent of that market share, it would make $55 million. Chipotle, the best newcomer of the last generation, has beaten that 1 percent handily. Last year, sales approached $3 billion. In the fourth quarter, they grew by 17 percent over the same period in the previous year.

Numbers are tricky to pin down for more healthful options because the fast food industry doesn’t yet have a category for “healthful.”...Chipotle combines the best aspects of Nouveau Junk to create a new category that we might call Improved Fast Food. At Chipotle, the food is fresher and tastes much better than traditional fast food. The sourcing, production and cooking is generally of a higher level; and the overall experience is more pleasant. The guacamole really is made on premises, and the chicken (however tasteless) is cooked before your eyes. It’s fairly easy to eat vegan there, but those burritos can pack on the calories. As a competitor told me, “Several brands had a head start on [the Chipotle founder Steve] Ells, but he kicked their [expletive] with culture and quality. It’s not shabby for assembly-line steam-table Mexican food. It might be worth $10 billion right now.” (It is.)

Chipotle no longer stands alone in the Improved Fast Food world: Chop’t, Maoz, Freshii, Zoës Kitchen and several others all have their strong points. And — like Chipotle — they all have their limitations, starting with calories and fat.
...Veggie Grill, Lyfe Kitchen, Tender Greens and others have solved the challenge of bringing formerly upscale, plant-based foods to more of a mass audience. But the industry seems to be focused on a niche group that you might call the health-aware sector of the population. (If you’re reading this article, you’re probably in it.) Whole Foods has proved that you can build a publicly traded business, with $16 billion in market capitalization, by appealing to this niche. But fast food is, at its core, a class issue. Many people rely on that Tendercrisp because they need to, and our country’s fast-food problem won’t be solved — no matter how much innovation in vegan options or high-tech ovens — until the prices come down and this niche sector is no longer niche. ...Soda consumption is down; meat consumption is down; sales of organic foods are up; more people are expressing concern about G.M.O.s, additives, pesticides and animal welfare. The lines out the door — first at Chipotle and now at Maoz, Chop’t, Tender Greens and Veggie Grill — don’t lie. According to a report in Advertising Age, McDonald’s no longer ranks in the top 10 favorite restaurants of Millennials, a group that comprises as many as 80 million people.
Lyfe_Kitchen  Mark_Bittman  fast-food  Burger_King  Chipotle  plant-based  vegetables  fresh_produce  vegan  McDonald's  social_classes  perishables  Whole_Foods  millennials  fast-casual  new_categories 
april 2013 by jerryking
Why the Soy Milk King Still Reigns By selling out to the nation's largest dairy distributor, White Wave president Steve Demos turned Silk into a beverage for the masses. - April 1, 2004
April 1, 2004 | Business 2.0 | By G. Pascal Zachary.
(1) Mainstream packaging - 1st soy milk packaged in conventional cartons and sold in dairy sections.
(2) Traditional taste - specially formulated for better flavour and mouth-feel.
(3) National distribution- an alliance with Dean Foods scored valuable shelf space.
(4) Devoted Management- Dean left the hippies in charge because they know soy best.
dairy  Dean_Foods  entrepreneur  exits  G._Pascal_Zachary  marketing  organic  plant-based  soybeans  Steve_Demos 
may 2012 by jerryking
What you need to know about 'other' milk - The Globe and Mail
LESLIE BECK
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 28, 2007
Leslie_Beck  milk  dairy  nondairy  rice  soybeans  plant-based 
june 2011 by jerryking
Gardein Protein founder reveals his recipe for success - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 31, 2011|Globe and Mail| SARAH HAMPSON. Profiles food
entrepreneur Yves Potvin who has a habit of making daily (sometimes even
nightly) lists. Which is obvious in his precise demeanour, his
bullet-point answers to questions. Those lists have shaped his career as
the Canadian millionaire pioneer of meat-replacement products. “I have
too many ideas. I create a stir,” says the founder and president of
Gardein Protein.
vegetarian  vegan  food  entrepreneur  plant-based  profile 
april 2011 by jerryking
Veg out, burger style
Aug 3, 2005 | The Globe & Mail pg. A.11 | by Leslie Beck.
hamburgers  Vegetarian  Leslie_Beck  nutrition  food  plant-based 
november 2009 by jerryking

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