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jerryking : poems   7

Beethoven’s Ode to Joy has been harnessed for good and ill
october 14, 2019 | FT.com | by Helen Brown.
Ode to Joy is the EU's anthem, music that was written by Beethoven. But “Ode to Joy” was composed with the dream of European peace and unity very much at its heart.

“Ode to Joy” appears like a burst of sunlight in the fourth and final movement of Beethoven’s stormy Ninth (and final) Symphony. The composer’s decision to bring a choir into the piece was revolutionary, giving soaring voice to a poem that had thrilled Beethoven as a young man: Freidrich Schiller’s “An die Freude”. Written in 1785 — on the brink of the French Revolution — the popular poem expressed a yearning for peace and egalitarianism: “All men will become brothers … Be embraced, you millions!”

As soon as he heard Schiller’s words, the young Beethoven imagined setting them to music. Like many liberal, cosmopolitan youths of the time, the German composer was excited by the ideals of the French Revolution and dedicated his Third Symphony to Napoleon Bonaparte before scratching out the name.
Beethoven  choirs  composers  EU  music  Napoleon_Bonaparte  poems  songs  symphonies 
october 2019 by jerryking
'Oldest known extract' of Homer's Odyssey discovered in Greece
Archaeologists in Greece have discovered what they believe to be the oldest known extract of Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey.

A team of Greek and German researchers found it on an engraved clay plaque in Ancient Olympia, the birthplace of the Olympic Games in the Peloponnese peninsula, the Greek culture ministry said on Tuesday.

It holds 13 verses from the Odyssey’s 14th Rhapsody, where its hero, Odysseus, addresses his lifelong friend Eumaeus. Preliminary estimates date the finding to the Roman era, probably before the 3rd century AD.

The date still needed to be confirmed, but the plaque was still “a great archaeological, epigraphic, literary and historical exhibit”, the ministry said.

The Odyssey, 12,109 lines of poetry attributed to the ancient Greek poet Homer, tells the story of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, who wanders for 10 years trying to get home after the fall of Troy.

The Odyssey is the second major poem attributed to Homer after the Iliad and scholars date its writing to around 675 - 725 BCE. It is widely considered to be among the world’s greatest works of literature
Greek  poems  poetry 
july 2018 by jerryking
Looking Death in the Face -
DEC. 26, 2016 | The New York Times | by John Kaag and Clancy Martin.

Shelley’s poem, “Ozymandias,”, tells us, nothing remains of this pharaoh's works or of him, despite his status as the king of kings. All that remains is sand.

The poem’s message is perennial: All of this will be over soon, faster than you think. Fame has a shadow — inevitable decline. The year 2016 has delivered a string of deaths that serve as bracing reminders of this inevitability: Prince, Nancy Reagan, David Bowie, Elie Wiesel, Bill Cunningham, Muhammad Ali, Gordie Howe, Merle Haggard, Patty Duke, John Glenn....The year’s end is a time to take account of kingdoms built, but also the sheer rapidity of their destruction. It is a chance to come to terms with the existential fragility that is overlooked in most of our waking hours and that must be faced even by the greatest among us....the scariest thing about death: coming to die only to discover, in Thoreau’s words, that we haven’t lived....Dying, of course, corresponds exactly with what we prefer to call living. This is what Samuel Beckett meant when he observed that we “give birth astride the grave.” It is an existential realization that may seem to be the province of the very sick or very old. The elderly get to watch the young and oblivious squander their days, time that they now recognize as incredibly precious....The trick to dying for something is picking the right something, day after week after precious year. And this is incredibly hard and decidedly not inevitable....
dying  howto  Egyptian_Empire  history  worthiness  discernment  overlooked  perennial  timeless  poems  decline  mybestlife  deaths 
december 2016 by jerryking
The Toronto Poetry Map: See (and read) a new way of exploring the city - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 13 2015

The Toronto Poetry Map captures the city in words. Click on an area and you’ll be presented with an excerpt, or several, from works referencing the street, or landmark, or neighbourhood....“The metaphysical Toronto is what we actually see in this map,” says Clarke. “The Toronto that’s conjured up by our imaginations as we ponder the reality of our existence here.”
poems  poetry  poets  Toronto  mapping  metaphysical  neighbourhoods  streetscapes  storytelling  imagination  landmarks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Building a Culture of Risk
26 Nov. 2010 | The Agenda | by Stavros Rougas . Canada doesn't
have the same risk-loving culture as our more entreprenurial neighbours
south of the border. In the 3rd segment of the prgrm we ask Glen Murray,
Ontario’s Min. of R & D& Innovation, how to encourage
innovation in a place that is proud of its risk intolerance in the fin.
sector. While the context of tonight’s program risk is about economics,
we'll end with a poem by the late Leo Buscaglia that speaks to the
underlying values of risk:
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure.
But risk must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to
risk nothing.
The person who risks nothing does nothing, has nothing, and is
nothing.
He may avoid suffering & sorrow, but he simply cannot learn,
feel, change, grow, live, or love.
Chained by his addictions, he's a slave.
He has forfeited his greatest trait, & that is his individual
freedom.
Only the person who risks is free.

- Leo Buscaglia
risks  risk-taking  organizational_culture  entrepreneurship  start_ups  inspiration  e-commerce  uWaterloo  innovation  poems  poetry  poets  soul-enriching  risk-tolerance 
november 2010 by jerryking

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