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'Oldest known extract' of Homer's Odyssey discovered in Greece
Archaeologists in Greece have discovered what they believe to be the oldest known extract of Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey.

A team of Greek and German researchers found it on an engraved clay plaque in Ancient Olympia, the birthplace of the Olympic Games in the Peloponnese peninsula, the Greek culture ministry said on Tuesday.

It holds 13 verses from the Odyssey’s 14th Rhapsody, where its hero, Odysseus, addresses his lifelong friend Eumaeus. Preliminary estimates date the finding to the Roman era, probably before the 3rd century AD.

The date still needed to be confirmed, but the plaque was still “a great archaeological, epigraphic, literary and historical exhibit”, the ministry said.

The Odyssey, 12,109 lines of poetry attributed to the ancient Greek poet Homer, tells the story of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, who wanders for 10 years trying to get home after the fall of Troy.

The Odyssey is the second major poem attributed to Homer after the Iliad and scholars date its writing to around 675 - 725 BCE. It is widely considered to be among the world’s greatest works of literature
Greek  poems  poetry 
july 2018 by jerryking
Memorize That Poem! - The New York Times
Molly Worthen AUG. 26, 2017
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poetry  memorization 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Toronto Poetry Map: See (and read) a new way of exploring the city - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 13 2015

The Toronto Poetry Map captures the city in words. Click on an area and you’ll be presented with an excerpt, or several, from works referencing the street, or landmark, or neighbourhood....“The metaphysical Toronto is what we actually see in this map,” says Clarke. “The Toronto that’s conjured up by our imaginations as we ponder the reality of our existence here.”
poems  poetry  poets  Toronto  mapping  metaphysical  neighbourhoods  streetscapes  storytelling  imagination  landmarks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Sturdy Verse - WSJ.com
February 3, 2003 | WSJ | By DAISY GOODWIN
poetry  inspiration 
august 2012 by jerryking
What John Keats Can Teach a CEO - WSJ.com
APRIL 18, 2011 WSJ By DANNY HEITMAN. The lessons of language
afforded by poetry can be a particularly valuable resource for any
workplace. Can poetry help you get ahead in business, too? "I find
that poetry helps me do my job better," I told my interviewer. "Good
poems teach you how to write simply and clearly, which is a must for
most businesses." I make my living as a newspaperman, where clarity of
expression is especially important. ....Read John Keats, Robert Frost,
Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, and learn how it's done. poets
throughout the ages have routinely confronted the challenge of saying a
lot—and saying it memorably—in small spaces....But maybe it's time that
we reconnect with poetry not as a rarified ritual, but as a vital force
of erudition and insight that can help shape the very texture of our
national life, including corporate culture.
brevity  CEOs  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  humanities  poets  poetry  small_spaces  reconnecting 
april 2011 by jerryking
Building a Culture of Risk
26 Nov. 2010 | The Agenda | by Stavros Rougas . Canada doesn't
have the same risk-loving culture as our more entreprenurial neighbours
south of the border. In the 3rd segment of the prgrm we ask Glen Murray,
Ontario’s Min. of R & D& Innovation, how to encourage
innovation in a place that is proud of its risk intolerance in the fin.
sector. While the context of tonight’s program risk is about economics,
we'll end with a poem by the late Leo Buscaglia that speaks to the
underlying values of risk:
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure.
But risk must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to
risk nothing.
The person who risks nothing does nothing, has nothing, and is
nothing.
He may avoid suffering & sorrow, but he simply cannot learn,
feel, change, grow, live, or love.
Chained by his addictions, he's a slave.
He has forfeited his greatest trait, & that is his individual
freedom.
Only the person who risks is free.

- Leo Buscaglia
risks  risk-taking  organizational_culture  entrepreneurship  start_ups  inspiration  e-commerce  uWaterloo  innovation  poems  poetry  poets  soul-enriching  risk-tolerance 
november 2010 by jerryking
40 ideas we need now -- Unlearning the tyranny of facts
Nov. 2006 | This Magazine | DAVID NAYLOR. Engage in critical
thinking. Pinpoint flaws in logic, dissect rhetorical flourishes away
from the core of an argument, examine issues from different perspectives
and differentiate science from pseudo-science...We are still very
focused on facts—arrayed in patterns, conveyed passively, or uncovered
more or less predictably through cookbook experimentation and
unchallenging exploration. That emphasis seems incongruous. With
computers able to store and search vast amounts of information, facts
are cheap [JCK:the Web is really a source of "external knowledge"]...What might the next generation of learners do instead of
memorizing facts, you ask? Among other things, they could read and play
music. Play more sports. Write prose and poetry. Acquire a skeptic’s
toolkit of sound reasoning skills. Debate highly-charged issues and
learn the lost art of rational and respectful discourse. Study
inspirational biographies, not to memorize facts, but to promote
understanding of how one might lead a more meaningful life.

[From my own note: the presence of facts does not mean that the truth is present. The "truth" is a more complicated thing than mere facts alone]
agreeably_disagree  argumentation  biographies  commoditization_of_information  critical_thinking  David_Naylor  disagreements  external_knowledge  facts  ideas  infoliteracy  inspiration  logic_&_reasoning  poetry  public_discourse  rhetoric  skepticism  sports  uToronto 
may 2009 by jerryking

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