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jerryking : poets   14

How Artists Change the World - The New York Times
AUG. 2, 2016 | NYT | David Brooks.

Frederick Douglass was not an artist but understood how to use a new art form. Douglass used his portraits to change the way viewers saw black people.....And that’s what Douglass did with his portraits. He took contemporary stereotypes of African-Americans — that they are inferior, unlettered, comic and dependent — and turned them upside down.....“Picturing Frederick Douglass,” curated by John Stauffer, Zoe Trodd and Celeste-Marie Bernier, and you can read a version of Gates’s essay in the new special issue of Aperture magazine, guest edited by Sarah Lewis.....Douglass was combating a set of generalized stereotypes by showing the specific humanity of one black man. ...Most of all, he was using art to reteach people how to see.

We are often under the illusion that seeing is a very simple thing. You see something, which is taking information in, and then you evaluate, which is the hard part.

But in fact perception and evaluation are the same thing. We carry around unconscious mental maps, built by nature and experience, that organize how we scan the world and how we instantly interpret and order what we see.

With these portraits, Douglass was redrawing people’s unconscious mental maps. ....“Poets, prophets and reformers are all picture makers — and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements,” Douglass wrote. This is where artists make their mark, by implanting pictures in the underwater processing that is upstream from conscious cognition. Those pictures assign weights and values to what the eyes take in.
David_Brooks  artists  photography  Frederick_Douglass  books  poets  prophets  mental_maps  interpretation  subconscious  portraits  humanity 
august 2016 by jerryking
Gord Downie’s Canada: Barstool bard has a lasting legacy of enigmatic erudition - The Globe and Mail
BRAD WHEELER
The Globe and Mail Last updated: Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Although it’s one of the most successful rock bands in Canadian history, the Tragically Hip’s true-north appeal has never been matched outside the country; the lack of American validation, however, is seen by fans as a point of pride – a Canadian success story on its own terms.
Brad_Wheeler  music  cancers  Canadiana  Canadian  Gord_Downie  songwriters  singers  legacies  patriotism  authenticity  Tragically_Hip  poets  rock-'n'-roll 
may 2016 by jerryking
The Toronto Poetry Map: See (and read) a new way of exploring the city - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 13 2015

The Toronto Poetry Map captures the city in words. Click on an area and you’ll be presented with an excerpt, or several, from works referencing the street, or landmark, or neighbourhood....“The metaphysical Toronto is what we actually see in this map,” says Clarke. “The Toronto that’s conjured up by our imaginations as we ponder the reality of our existence here.”
poems  poetry  poets  Toronto  mapping  metaphysical  neighbourhoods  streetscapes  storytelling  imagination  landmarks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Gil Scott-Heron, Poet Behind 'The Revolution Will Not be Televised,' Dies at 62 - Speakeasy - WSJ
MAY 27, 2011 | WSJ | WSJ Staff.Gil Scott-Heron, the poet
behind the song “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” has died
in New York City. He was 62 years old....“The Revolution Will Not Be
Televised” was a blast at consumer culture and its ability to lead
social change.
obituaries  poets  African-Americans  social 
may 2011 by jerryking
What John Keats Can Teach a CEO - WSJ.com
APRIL 18, 2011 WSJ By DANNY HEITMAN. The lessons of language
afforded by poetry can be a particularly valuable resource for any
workplace. Can poetry help you get ahead in business, too? "I find
that poetry helps me do my job better," I told my interviewer. "Good
poems teach you how to write simply and clearly, which is a must for
most businesses." I make my living as a newspaperman, where clarity of
expression is especially important. ....Read John Keats, Robert Frost,
Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, and learn how it's done. poets
throughout the ages have routinely confronted the challenge of saying a
lot—and saying it memorably—in small spaces....But maybe it's time that
we reconnect with poetry not as a rarified ritual, but as a vital force
of erudition and insight that can help shape the very texture of our
national life, including corporate culture.
brevity  CEOs  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  humanities  poets  poetry  small_spaces  reconnecting 
april 2011 by jerryking
Building a Culture of Risk
26 Nov. 2010 | The Agenda | by Stavros Rougas . Canada doesn't
have the same risk-loving culture as our more entreprenurial neighbours
south of the border. In the 3rd segment of the prgrm we ask Glen Murray,
Ontario’s Min. of R & D& Innovation, how to encourage
innovation in a place that is proud of its risk intolerance in the fin.
sector. While the context of tonight’s program risk is about economics,
we'll end with a poem by the late Leo Buscaglia that speaks to the
underlying values of risk:
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure.
But risk must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to
risk nothing.
The person who risks nothing does nothing, has nothing, and is
nothing.
He may avoid suffering & sorrow, but he simply cannot learn,
feel, change, grow, live, or love.
Chained by his addictions, he's a slave.
He has forfeited his greatest trait, & that is his individual
freedom.
Only the person who risks is free.

- Leo Buscaglia
risks  risk-taking  organizational_culture  entrepreneurship  start_ups  inspiration  e-commerce  uWaterloo  innovation  poems  poetry  poets  soul-enriching  risk-tolerance 
november 2010 by jerryking
C.E.O. Libraries Reveal Keys to Success
July 21, 2007 | New York Times | By HARRIET RUBIN. Serious
leaders who are serious readers build personal libraries dedicated to
how to think, not how to compete. If there is a C.E.O. canon, its rule
is this: “Don’t follow your mentors, follow your mentors’ mentors,”
suggests David Leach, chief executive of the American Medical
Association’s accreditation division. Forget finding the business
best-seller list in these libraries. “I try to vary my reading diet and
ensure that I read more fiction than nonfiction,” Mr. Moritz said. “I
rarely read business books..." Favourites: T. E. Lawrence’s ‘Seven
Pillars of Wisdom,’ Machiavelli’s “The Prince.”, Omar Khayyam’s
“Rubáiyát,”
book_reviews  CEOs  reading  books  collectors  fiction  critical_thinking  strategic_thinking  personal_libraries  poets  Michael_Moritz  Ogilvy_&_Mather  mentoring  Niccolò_Machiavelli 
november 2009 by jerryking
MERGING THE ACADEMIC AND PRACTICAL
Aug 25, 2008 | The Globe & Mail pg. B.1 | by Gordon Pitts
Gordon_Pitts  profile  HBS  Rotman  entrepreneur  poets 
june 2009 by jerryking

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