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jerryking : political_correctness   21

Opinion | The Meritocracy Is Ripping America Apart
Sept. 12, 2019 | - The New York Times | By David Brooks.

savage exclusion tears the social fabric.

There are at least two kinds of meritocracy in America right now. Exclusive meritocracy exists at the super-elite universities and at the industries that draw the bulk of their employees from them — Wall Street, Big Law, medicine and tech. And then there is the more open meritocracy that exists almost everywhere else.

In the exclusive meritocracy, prestige is defined by how many people you can reject....The more the exclusivity, the thicker will be the coating of P.C. progressivism to show that we’re all good people.

People in this caste work phenomenally hard to build their wealth......People in this caste are super-skilled and productive.....These highly educated professionals attract vast earnings while everybody else gets left behind......Parents in the exclusive meritocracy raise their kids to be fit fighters within it....affluent parents invest on their kids’ human capital, over and above what middle-class parents can afford to invest......the Kansas Leadership Center. The center teaches people how to create social change and hopes to saturate the state with better leaders. But the center doesn’t focus on traditional “leaders.” Its mantra is: “Leadership is an activity, not a position. Anyone can lead, anytime, anywhere.” The atmosphere is one of radical inclusion.....People in both the exclusive and open meritocracies focus intensely on increasing skills. But it’s jarring to move from one culture to the other because the values are so different. The exclusive meritocracy is spinning out of control. If the country doesn’t radically expand its institutions and open access to its bounty, the U.S. will continue to rip apart.
Accomplisher_Class  Big_Law  caste_systems  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Brooks  elitism  exclusivity  hard_work  human_capital  inequality  law_firms  leadership  medicine  meritocracy  op-ed  parenting  political_correctness  social_classes  social_exclusion  social_fabric  social_impact  social_inclusion  social_mobility  society  technology  values  Wall_Street  winner-take-all 
september 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., Mr. Sullivan is a law professor at Harvard Law School.

In May, Harvard College announced that it would not renew the appointment of me and my wife, Stephanie Robinson, as faculty deans of Winthrop House, one of Harvard’s undergraduate residential houses, because I am one of the lawyers who represented the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in advance of his coming sexual assault trial. The administration’s decision followed reports by some students that they felt “unsafe” in an institution led by a lawyer who would take on Mr. Weinstein as a client.

I am willing to believe that some students felt unsafe. But feelings alone should not drive university policy. Administrators must help students distinguish between feelings that have a rational basis and those that do not. In my case, Harvard missed an opportunity to help students do that......I would hope that any student who felt unsafe as a result of my representation of Mr. Weinstein might, after a reasoned discussion of the relevant facts, question whether his or her feelings were warranted. But Harvard was not interested in having that discussion. Nor was Harvard interested in facilitating conversations about the appropriate role of its faculty in addressing sexual violence and the tension between protecting the rights of the criminally accused and treating survivors of sexual violence with respect.

Instead, the administration capitulated to protesters. Given that universities are supposed to be places of considered and civil discourse, where people are forced to wrestle with difficult, controversial and unfamiliar ideas, this is disappointing......reasoned discourse lost out to raw feelings......I am not opposed to student protest. Many important social justice movements began with student protests, including movements from which I, as an African-American, have benefited. Had it not been for students who staged sit-ins at lunch counters, I would not have had the opportunity to be trained at Harvard Law School.

But I am profoundly troubled by the reaction of university administrators who are in charge of student growth and development. The job of a teacher is to help students think through what constitutes a reasonable argument. It is a dereliction of duty for administrators to allow themselves to be bullied into ..Unchecked emotion has replaced thoughtful reasoning on campus. Feelings are no longer subjected to evidence, analysis or empirical defense. Angry demands, rather than rigorous arguments, now appear to guide university policy.
African-Americans  bullying  capitulation  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  firings  gut_feelings  Harvard  Harvey_Weinstein  HLS  intolerance  logic_&_reasoning  missed_opportunities  op-ed  policymaking  political_correctness  professors  protests  students 
june 2019 by jerryking
The trouble with the Toronto high-school black list - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
PUBLISHED 15 HOURS AGO

Last year, the Toronto District School Board issued a report noting that the student body at specialty schools such as ESA tends to be whiter and more prosperous than the board average. Detecting bastions of entitlement, the authors of the report recommended shutting down the schools in the name of equity. That was an awful idea. Toronto’s specialty schools are gems. Parents revolted and the school board backed down. Specialty schools would stay. But a cloud continued to hang over ESA. Its principal, Peggy Aitchison, wanted to do everything she could to make sure the school was not “creating inequity.” So “with an objective of supporting success for all students, particularly those for whom we know as a group there are gaps,” she came up with a plan. She would give teachers a list of black students. It came to be called the “black list.”.....At institutions such as the Toronto board, which distinguished itself by banning the word “chief” from job titles to spare the feelings of Indigenous people, the air is simply full of talk about white privilege and systemic racism. The old ideal of colour blindness has gone right out the window. If you say that individuals should be judged by the content of their character not the colour of their skin, you simply don’t get it.

Here is the paradox of today’s Canada. Thanks to evolving attitudes and the critical work of crusaders for racial justice, prejudice is less prevalent that it has ever been. This country is approaching a moment that idealists have dreamed about for centuries − the moment when who you are matters more than how you look, how you pray or where you come from. Yet at this very moment, so full of promise, we find ourselves positively obsessed with racial identity.
high_schools  TDSB  race  elitism  political_correctness  identity_politics  Marcus_Gee  Toronto  arts  Etobicoke 
july 2018 by jerryking
Globe editorial: Banning a word isn’t going to help Indigenous Canadians - The Globe and Mail
There are scores of reserves across this country still under boil-water advisories. Indigenous Canadians live shorter lives than their fellow citizens, have lower incomes, are less likely to be in school or have a job, and more likely to be in jail. These are the real issues. The problem is not that job titles like "chief financial officer" exist. The problem is that too few native Canadians occupy such jobs, and too few are in a position to do so.

That's not something that can be fixed by purging a word.
aboriginals  political_correctness  TDSB  CTOs  CEOs 
october 2017 by jerryking
On campus, it’s good to be bothered by a diversity of ideas - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Sep. 05, 2016

consider the advice U.S. President Barack Obama gave last spring to the graduating class of Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C.

“Don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them,” Mr. Obama said in May. “There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice. But listen. Engage. If the other side has a point, learn from them. If they’re wrong, rebut them. Teach them. Beat them on the battlefield of ideas. And you might as well start practising now, because one thing I can guarantee you, you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks … at every stage of your life.”

Better yet, students should, in Prof. Levinovitz’s words, see university as a “boot camp, not a hotel.” You’re there to toughen up for real life, not shield yourself from its infuriating injustices, painful conflicts and, yes, even the Donald Trumps of this world. Because they’re everywhere.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  ideas  intellectual_exploration  political_correctness  censorship  political_orthodoxy  free_speech  hate_speech  safe_spaces  civility  polarization  intellectual_diversity  disagreements  argumentation  heterogeneity  core_values 
september 2016 by jerryking
For Whites Sensing Decline, Donald Trump Unleashes Words of Resistance
JULY 13, 2016 | - The New York Times | By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE.

The resentment among whites feels both old and distinctly of this moment. It is shaped by the reality of demographic change, by a decade and a half of war in the Middle East, and by unease with the newly confident and confrontational activism of young blacks furious over police violence. It is mingled with patriotism, pride, fear and a sense that an America without them at its center is not really America anymore.

In the months since Mr. Trump began his campaign, the percentage of Americans who say race relations are worsening has increased, reaching nearly half in an April poll by CBS News. The sharpest rise was among Republicans: Sixty percent said race relations were getting worse.

And Mr. Trump’s rise is shifting the country’s racial discourse just as the millennial generation comes fully of age, more and more distant from the horrors of the Holocaust, or the government-sanctioned racism of Jim Crow.
Campaign_2016  Patrick_Buchanan  decline  deindustrialization  multiculturalism  globalization  race_relations  Donald_Trump  resentments  grievances  political_correctness  white_identity  identity_politics  bigotry  race_card  birthers  Colleges_&_Universities  whites  working_class  blue-collar  racial_resentment 
july 2016 by jerryking
The children of the Obama era are angry - FT.com
November 13, 2015 2:27 pm
The children of the Obama era are angry
Gary Silverman
Obama  Colleges_&_Universities  Mizzou  Yale  political_correctness 
november 2015 by jerryking
Mizzou, Yale and Free Speech - The New York Times
NOV. 11, 2015 | NYT | Nicholas Kristof.

On university campuses across the country, from Mizzou to Yale, we have two noble forces colliding with explosive force

One is a concern for minority or marginalized students and faculty members, who are often left feeling as outsiders in ways that damage everyone’s education. ........ the other noble force in these upheavals — free expression. ....academia — especially the social sciences — undermines itself by a tilt to the left. We should cherish all kinds of diversity, including the presence of conservatives to infuriate us liberals and make us uncomfortable. Education is about stretching muscles, and that’s painful in the gym and in the lecture hall....My favorite philosopher, the late Sir Isaiah Berlin, argued that there was a deep human yearning to find the One Great Truth. In fact, he said, that’s a dead end: Our fate is to struggle with a “plurality of values,” with competing truths, with trying to reconcile what may well be irreconcilable.

That’s unsatisfying. It’s complicated. It’s also life.
Nicholas_Kristof  Yale  Mizzou  irreconcilables  freedom_expression  struggles  values  Isaiah_Berlin  Colleges_&_Universities  intolerance  political_correctness 
november 2015 by jerryking
SOMETIMES RACE IS SIMPLY A FACTOR
October 31, 2002 | National Post | Christie Blatchford

As the Star study also apparently revealed, black people represent almost 27% of all violence charges such as homicides, sex assaults and gun-related offences -- a percentage way out of whack in a city where, according to the most recent census figures, only 8.1% of Torontonians described themselves as black.

(Interestingly, the headline on this story, which read ''Black crime rates highest,'' was corrected the next day, lest anyone got the wrong impression: It was true, the correction said, that black Torontonians accounted for the highest amount of violent crime, but that did not mean they have the highest crime rate, ''which the Star's analysis of Toronto police data did not measure.'' Huh?)
Christie_Blatchford  statistics  Julian_Fantino  murders  Toronto  race  criminality  killings  political_correctness  silence  demographic_changes  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  Toronto_Police_Service  criminal_justice_system  violent_crime 
november 2011 by jerryking
Prejudice
Tuesday, January 03, 2006
Ted Hayes: Prejudice
Black Republicans should be able to live without fear.

The Wall Street Journal
Monday, January 2, 2006
African-Americans  GOP  conservatism  political_correctness  prejudices 
november 2011 by jerryking
What Makes a Difference - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 26, 2003 | WSJ | By ADAM WOLFSON.

Mr. Wood locates the origins of the modern diversity movement in President Johnson's 1965 executive order authorizing the use of affirmative action in federal contracting. The policy quickly spread to other sectors of society.

In its early years, affirmative action was rationalized as a means of making up for the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow and other forms of discrimination -- a kind of reparations. But even in this relatively benign form the policy was open to challenge on the grounds that it violated the 14th Amendment's guarantee of equal protection. Eventually the Supreme Court weighed in with Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978). But not conclusively or even coherently.

The case concerned Allan Bakke, who had been denied admission to medical school in favor of less-qualified minority candidates. In a confused decision, the court agreed that quotas were impermissible under the equal-protection clause. But Justice Lewis Powell's opinion -- which no other justice signed on to -- included a passage that would prove momentous: He argued that the goal of "attaining a diverse student body" provided a "constitutionally permissible" justification for racial preferences.
[Book]

An idea now with nearly the same stature as equality and liberty. Why?

The curious thing is that, before Powell's opinion, the diversity defense of affirmative action was almost unheard of. It may have been, as Mr. Wood writes, "in the cultural air," but it was at best "a fairly marginal idea." If proof were ever needed that ideas -- including marginal ones -- have consequences, this was it. Diversity was soon everywhere. Today, Mr. Wood observes, it enjoys nearly the same stature as equality and liberty in the American pantheon.....Meanwhile diversity provided cover for a cultural revolution in higher learning: In its wake followed multicultural studies, sensitivity seminars, political correctness and speech codes.
diversity  book_reviews  affirmative_action  political_correctness  Colleges_&_Universities  LBJ 
november 2011 by jerryking
When we fear to speak our minds on black and white
Thorsell, William. The Globe and Mail [Toronto, Ont] 18 Nov 2002: .19.

Canada is a famously functional multicultural society, at least in the ambience of its major cities. It is our habit to celebrate the delightful variations in dress, cuisine, rituals and appearances that grace our major cities, and why not? They provide interest and sensual pleasure to an otherwise predictable landscape, however fleeting such pleasures may be.

Of more significance are the varied sensibilities among these communities -- loyalty, altruism, ethics. We often express admiration for the particular strengths of certain communities, evident in the success of their children in universities or their eminence in certain economic fields (construction, small business, security). On these grounds of observation, we are usually safe from charges of racism.

But if multiculturalism justifies happy observations about collective virtues, it must logically sustain generalizations about social vices, too. And, of course, it does -- in private. Only the dumbest hypocrite would deny holding attitudes that are less than flattering about various communities within our midst.
racism  ethnic_communities  ProQuest  multiculturalism  William_Thorsell  race_relations  Canada  Jamaicans  political_correctness 
october 2011 by jerryking
Oct. 25: Letters to the editor - The Globe and Mail
The love canoe

Stephen Slemon, in attacking Margaret Wente's denunciation of the meaningless language of “feminist geographers” (They Hijacked The Humanities, And My Canoe – Oct. 22), echoes other letter writers (Mapping Margaret – Oct. 24) in claiming she's just not made the effort to understand their technical language, comparable to that of kinesiology or mathematics. A more appropriate comparison would be the cryptic pronouncements of astrology or numerology.

Had these prostitutions of astronomy and mathematics been taught in Canadian universities, I would object to the perverse use of my taxes. Astrology courses are not being offered yet, but large components of our departments of humanities and the vast majority of our faculties of education wallow in the same mire of irrationality.

David Munoz, professor, University of Toronto
letters_to_the_editor  Margaret_Wente  political_correctness 
october 2011 by jerryking
They hijacked the humanities, then my canoe - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011
humanities  radical_chic  political_correctness  Margaret_Wente  liberal_arts  Colleges_&_Universities  geography 
october 2011 by jerryking
Irshad Manji: A Muslim Reformer on the Mosque - WSJ.com
AUGUST 26, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By IRSHAD MANJI. "
Debates across America over Islamic centers and mosques won't soon be
resolved. But this summer's hysteria is giving the upper hand to one
nefarious force: the culture of offense.

Election-year politics, ratings-hungry media and deep personal fear
foment raw emotion. In such an environment, "I'm offended" takes on the
stature of a substantive argument. Too many Americans are mistaking
feeling for thinking. "
tolerance  critical_thinking  Park51  Irshad_Manji  political_correctness  feelings  mistakes 
august 2010 by jerryking
: The Politically Incorrect Guide to Ending Poverty
July/August 2010 | The Atlantic Magazine | By Sebastian
Mallaby. In the 1990s, Paul Romer revolutionized economics. In the
aughts, he became rich as a software entrepreneur. Now he’s trying to
help the poorest countries grow rich—by convincing them to establish
foreign-run “charter cities” within their borders. Romer’s idea is
unconventional, even neo-colonial—the best analogy is Britain’s historic
lease of Hong Kong. And against all odds, he just might make it happen.
noughties  poverty  economic_development  Paul_Romer  rules_of_the_game  neocolonialism  recolonization  analogies  unconventional  city-states  political_correctness  enclaves  Hong_Kong  economic  economists 
june 2010 by jerryking
Judah Pearl op-ed: Daniel Pearl and the Normalization of Evil - WSJ.com 2/3/09
Feb. 3, 2009 WSJ op-ed b Judea Pearl, in tribute on the 7th
anniversary of his son Danny's passing. He remarks on the habit of
polite society to cloak the barbarism and terrorism with the neutral
phrase, "resistance".
danny_pearl  terrorism  grievances  resistance  murders  anti-Semitism  political_correctness 
february 2009 by jerryking

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