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jerryking : population_trends   10

Nurse Next Door puts new spin on getting old
Jul. 12 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Susan Krashinsky.

The boomer generation represents a game change for the home care industry: They are emerging from a labour market where tech skills are essential. That means clients are about to get a lot more vocal, and they will make themselves heard - not just if the care is subpar, but also if they feel bored or underserved. Nurse Next Door's marketing campaign relies heavily on social media and word of mouth. In order to compete, home care nurses will have to nurture a social-media presence, and go above and beyond to become part of a service industry, not just a care industry [JCK: hints at the need for improved standards for those working within the home care industry].

"Our clients will be using Twitter," DeHart says. "We'd better be really good at what we do."
aging  baby_boomers  caregiving  franchising  game_changers  home_based  home_care  nursing  population_trends  skills  social_media  Susan_Krashinsky  underserved 
april 2013 by jerryking
Middle East and Africa: Huddled masses
Nov 21st 2012 | | The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition | Jonathan Ledgard.

It is unclear how jobs will be created in cities that have little industry. Innovative services on African mobile phones will win praise in Silicon Valley in 2013, but software can do only so much. Look down the list of growing cities and a host of little-known places like Huambo, Mbuji-Mayi and Mbeya will be expected to serve populations the size of Milan’s—with little infrastructure.
Within a decade Lagos will have 16m people

The standard view of cities as generators of wealth, diversity and ideas will be challenged in Africa. The exclusion of the poor will be magnified by a lack of public space and by rising living costs. To become liveable, cities will have to improve public transport. Many are trying, but safety will be a challenge: murder, and violent carjackings and robberies, will rise in many cities in 2013, sometimes with police involvement....What is certain is that African cities will be the most informal economies in the world in 2013. Some 70% of workers will live on their wits, relying on day labour to make enough to eat, pay rent and send their children to school. That will make cities dynamic and mobile, but also combustible.
cities  Africa  Cairo  Johannesburg  informal_economy  Cape_Town  Lagos  population_growth  population_trends  urban 
january 2013 by jerryking
Go west, young Canadians - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 09, 2012

The country’s economic, demographic and political power are all shifting. Western power has already begun to change our national values. Stephen Harper’s majority was no fluke. He was elected by a new coalition of westerners and voters in the suburbs of Toronto. These people prefer CTV to the CBC. They think Ottawa and government should matter less, and they seldom think about Quebec at all. This is an epochal shift.
demographic_changes  Alberta  Quebec  population_growth  population_trends  Margaret_Wente  commodities  oil_industry  Saskatchewan  natural_resources 
february 2012 by jerryking
McGurn: A Requiem for Detroit - WSJ.com
MARCH 29, 2011 WSJ By WILLIAM MCGURN. A once-great American
city today repels people of talent and ambition.....What's left is the
city so embarrassingly exposed by the census figures, a place that
people are fleeing as fast as they can. Think of all the dysfunctional
measures you can: poverty rates, unemployment, crime, failing public
schools, falling home values. Detroit has them all, and most of its
indicators rank among the worst in the nation.
Detroit  leadership  Dave_Bing  William_McGurn  demoralization  population_trends  downward_mobility  demographic_changes  dysfunction 
april 2011 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: A Nation in Motion
DECEMBER 22, 2010 | WSJ.com. The Census is in. There are now
308.74 million Americans, an increase of 27 million, or 9.7%, since
2000. Americans are still multiplying, one of the best indicators that
the country's prospects remain strong.
About 13 million of that increase were new immigrants. These newcomers
brought energy, talent, entrepreneurial skills and a work ethic. Their
continued arrival in such large numbers validates that the rest of the
world continues to view the U.S. as a land of freedom and opportunity.
The Census figures also confirm that America is a nation in constant
motion, with tens of millions hopping across state lines and changing
residence since 2000. And more of them are moving into conservative,
market-friendly red states than into progressive, public-sector heavy
blue states. In order the 10 states with the greatest population gains
were Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia,
Florida, Colorado and South Carolina.
census  population_trends  internal_migration  work_ethic  immigrants  immigration  North_Carolina 
december 2010 by jerryking

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