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jerryking : portfolio_management   25

JAB’s Peter Harf: hire ambitious talent and give them a mission
February 16, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud and Arash Massoudi.

JAB oversees its portfolio of coffee, beverages, and casual dining companies. .....When everything was going wrong last year at Coty, the cosmetics company backed by investment group JAB Holdings, Peter Harf reacted with characteristic ruthlessness, replacing Coty’s chief financial officer and chief executive, and taking back the Coty chairmanship from his longtime associate, Bart Becht. Describing last year’s share price decline of more than 60% as “unacceptable” for JAB and its co-investors, Mr Harf says the situation “had to have serious consequences” even for his inner circle......Harf believes that identifying talented people — and incentivising them through performance-based pay — have been key to his success over his nearly 40-year career..... just as important to Harf is knowing when to jettison those who are no longer serving the mission he has overseen since he was 35: growing the wealth of Germany’s reclusive Reimann family who are behind JAB....Harf's vision was for JAB to be modelled on Berkshire Hathaway, the investment conglomerate built by his idol, Warren Buffett. Success would come not only from backing the right leaders but by patiently building brands, embarking on deals and taking companies public to cash in on bets....Harf felt he had assembled a dream team: “My mantra has always been that I need to hire people who are better than me. Lions hire lions and sheep hire other sheep.”

Three questions for Peter Harf
(1) Who is your leadership hero?

“Warren Buffett. Hands down. All this stuff that I intend to do to make JAB into a long-term investment vehicle, he does it to perfection. He’s the greatest investor in the world, and I want to be like him. If we invest as well as Warren, we’ve won. Very simple.”

(3) What was your first leadership lesson?

One of my biggest role models was Bruce Henderson, the founder of Boston Consulting Group. When I worked for him, I prepared a three-page analysis about a problem. It had 10 bullet points as the conclusion. He dismissed it as way too complicated and said: “Don’t try to field every ball.” He meant that if you wanted to be a good leader, you have to be able to focus on the important stuff first.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The trouble often starts when leaders start listing five or seven or 11 priorities. As Jim Collins, the author of the best-selling management books “Good to Great” and “Built to Last,” is fond of saying: “If you have more than three priorities, you don’t have any.”
BCG  Berkshire_Hathaway  beverages  casual_dining  coffee  commitments  CPG  dealmakers  deal-making  departures  exits  family_office  family-owned_businesses  HBS  hiring  investors  JAB  Keurig  lifelong  mission-driven  private_equity  portfolio_management  ruthlessness  talent  troubleshooting  Warren_Buffett 
february 2019 by jerryking
JAB chair Bart Becht quits in split with partners
January 14, 2019 | Financial Times | Leila Abboud in Paris and Arash Massoudi.

Bart Becht's departure is the first outward display of tensions within JAB, created to manage the wealth of Germany’s billionaire Reimann family. The chairman of JAB Holdings, the acquisition-hungry owner of Pret A Manger and Keurig Dr Pepper, has quit after a five-year $50bn takeover spree led to a split with his two partners over the scale of the investment group’s dealmaking.

According to two people with direct knowledge of his decision, Bart Becht, a hard-charging 62-year-old consumer industry executive, stepped down after failing to convince JAB to scale back its takeover ambitions to focus on improving operations at its sprawling portfolio of companies.....The once-obscure investment vehicle has vaulted itself into the top tier of consumer products groups through acquisitions of high-profile US brands like Krispy Kreme, Peet’s Coffee and Covergirl owner Coty, competing directly with industry giants including Nestlé and Coca-Cola in coffee and L’Oreal in make-up......One person who has worked closely with JAB described Mr Becht’s decision as “undoubtedly a surprise”, especially since the trio of executives had only recently been raising money from outside investors and pitching themselves as long-term investors.

JAB operates in a similar way to a private equity investor, but with much longer time horizons. It is often willing to own portfolio companies for decades, often engineering an expansion via acquisitions.....The fundraising also coincided with a strategy shift as JAB exited investments in luxury and fashion to focus on what it calls premium food and beverage, casual dining, and coffee.
CPG  dealmakers  departures  exits  family_office  family-owned_businesses  hard-charging  investors  JAB  Keurig  private_equity  portfolio_management  time_horizons 
january 2019 by jerryking
Travel Agents? No. Travel ‘Designers’ Create Strategies, Not Trips. - The New York Times
By JOANNE KAUFMAN JULY 5, 2017

Affluent travelers are turning to travel designers, whose services go beyond booking trips to managing travel portfolios.....a subset of travel planners — they prefer the term travel designers — who do far more than simply book trips. They manage the travel portfolios of their affluent clients, mapping out a schedule that might, over a year, include mother-daughter weekends in the Caribbean, father-son heli-skiing, a romantic husband-and-wife weekend getaway and an elaborate summer trip for the whole family.....A high level of planning and involvement “is part of an emerging market where there are people who have more money than time and want expertise,” ..... For example, he said, “a traditional travel agent wouldn’t know to ask questions like ‘what’s the smallest plane you’d be willing to fly on?’”

Such clients,...may not be price sensitive, but are highly sensitive to perceived slights. “Someone I know professionally,” he said, “went on a trip to a remote location and was served frozen orange juice, and told me he would never use his travel designer again because he expected fresh juice.”

Often, long-range planning is a practical necessity. Some of the most sought-after lodges and boutique hotels have limited space.....my own take, a caveat, is that it is unclear whether the degree of planning involved leaves room for serendipity (See Add Uncertainty to Your Financial Plans - NYTimes.com)
affluence  boutique_hotels  concierge_services  curation  detail_oriented  high_net_worth  high-touch  hospitality  hotels  itineraries  long-range  luxury  planning  portfolio_management  serendipity  travel  travel_agents  uncertainty 
july 2017 by jerryking
As an Investor, Do You Suffer from ‘Narrow Framing’? - WSJ
By Shlomo Benartzi
June 11, 2017

Many of the financial mistakes people make are caused by a fundamental shortcoming: They can’t see the big picture.

In behavioral economics circles, this is known as “narrow framing”—a tendency to see investments without considering the context of the overall portfolio. Many people are vulnerable to it.
investors  behavioural_economics  narrow-framing  the_big_picture  portfolio_management 
june 2017 by jerryking
Canada needs an innovative intellectual property strategy - The Globe and Mail
JAMES HINTON AND PETER COWAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 19, 2017

Canada has never before had a national IP strategy, so getting it right will set the stage for subsequent innovation strategies. Here are some factors that our policy makers must take into account:

(1) Canadian innovators have only a basic understanding about IP

Canadian entrepreneurs understand IP strategy as a defensive mechanism to protect their products. In reality, IP is the most critical

(2) Focus on global IP landscape, rather than tweak domestic IP rules

Canada’s IP regime, including the Canadian Intellectual Property Office, needs a strategy that reflects global norms for IP protection, protects Canadian consumers and shrewdly supports Canadian innovators.l tool for revenue growth and global expansion in a 21st-century economy.

(3) Canadian businesses own a dismal amount of IP

Although IP has emerged as the most valuable corporate asset over the past two decades, it is overlooked by Canadian policy makers and businesses.
(4) Building quality patent portfolio requires technically savvy experts

A high-quality patent portfolio needs to include issued and in-force patents, including patents outside of Canada in key markets such as the United States and Europe. Strong portfolios will also have broad sets of claims that are practised by industry, spread across many patents creating a cloud of rights with pending applications.
(5) IP benefits from public-private partnerships are flowing out of country.

Canada’s innovation strategy must consider ownership and retention of our IP as one of its core principles. Are we satisfied with perpetually funding IP creation while letting foreign countries reap the benefits?
21st._century  Canada  Canadian  defensive_tactics  digital_economy  digital_savvy  digital_strategies  high-quality  intangibles  intellectual_property  IP_generation  IP_retention  Jim_Balsillie  overlooked  patents  policymakers  portfolios  portfolio_management  property_rights  protocols  strategic_thinking 
may 2017 by jerryking
Network orchestrators are the new path to profit - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 03, 2016 | Special to The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

* "The Network Imperative" by authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck, and Jerry Wind.

Technology - Shift from physical to digital. Develop a digitally enabled platform around which people can congregate.

Assets - Shift from tangible to intangible assets. Physical assets are becoming a liability. Pay attention to your brand, a key intangible asset, and also view people as an asset, not an expense.

Strategy -move from operator to allocator. As a strategist, Mr. Libert has spent many years working with leaders to figure out what products to sell to what market. But these days, leaders should be active allocators of capital, like portfolio managers.

Leadership - The shift here is from commander – in charge of a highly structured, hierarchical, top-down organization – to co-creator, who knows how to motivate, inspire and work alongside others to develop the network.

Boards - His favourite shift, because it is the most difficult, is the switch from governance to representation.
Finally, the mindset must change to thinking less rigidly about roles, processes, products and industries.
assets  atoms_&_bits  books  business_models  capital_allocation  co-creation  eBay  Etsy  flexibility  Harvey_Schachter  intangibles  mindsets  networks  orchestration  pay_attention  platforms  portfolio_management  physical_assets  resource_allocation 
july 2016 by jerryking
How to Avoid the Innovation Death Spiral | Innovation Management
By: Wouter Koetzier

Consider this all too familiar scenario: Company X’s new products developed and launched with great expectations, yield disappointing results. Yet, these products continue to languish in the market, draining management attention, advertising budgets, manufacturing capacity, warehouse space and back office systems. Wouter Koetzier explores how to avoid the innovation death spiral....
Incremental innovations play a role in defending a company’s baseline against competition, rather than offering customers superior benefits or creating additional demand for its products.
Platform innovations drive some market growth (often due to premium pricing rather than expanded volume), but their main function is to increase the innovator’s market share by giving customers a reason to switch from a competitor’s brand.
Breakthrough innovations create a new market that the innovator can dominate for some time by delivering new benefits to customers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, breakthrough innovations typically aren’t based upon major technological inventions; rather, they often harness existing technology in novel ways, such as Apple’s iPad.......A recent Accenture analysis of 10 large players in the global foods industry over a three-year period demonstrates the strategic costs of failure to innovate successfully. Notably, the study found little correlation between R&D spending and revenue growth. For instance, a company launching more products than their competitors actually saw less organic revenue growth. That’s because the company made only incremental innovations, while its competitors launched a balanced portfolio of incremental, platform and breakthrough innovations that were perceived by the market as adding value.
Accenture  attrition_rates  baselines  breakthroughs  correlations  disappointment  downward_spirals  howto  incrementalism  innovation  kill_rates  life_cycle  portfolios  portfolio_management  platforms  LBMA  marginal_improvements  Mondelez  moonshots  new_products  novel  product_development  product_launches  R&D  taxonomy 
march 2016 by jerryking
Why Small Businesses Are Starting to Win Again - The New Yorker
JANUARY 24, 2015
Small Is Bountiful
BY TIM WU

Farmers who sell, say, organic or free-range foods, cannot hope to compete based on price. Instead, they try to create consumers who won’t eat chicken produced by big companies for moral, health, or aesthetic reasons...The true-differentiation strategy seems to work best when scale, despite its efficiencies, also introduces blind spots in areas such as customer service, flavor, curation, or other intangibles not entirely consistent with mass production and standardization. Where getting big begins to hurt the product, small can be bountiful.

=====================================
it is a two-part problem. No. 1, the consumer and competitive marketplace is definitely shifting. For example, quality has evolved beyond just good ingredients, preparation and packaging. Basic quality is a given now; many consumers are looking for something extra: less mass-produced, natural, local.

No. 2, iconic food companies and their mature brands are not responding effectively. Large, established food companies and their brands are being managed as portfolios of revenue and profit streams with a short-term financial orientation, and not as companies that produce food products. Small companies, on the other hand, are being created and managed by people with a food orientation and passion.
small_business  size  scaling  Tim_Wu  Peter_Drucker  portfolio_management  Gulliver_strategies  differentiation  trends  breweries  beers  craftsmanship  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  revenge_effects  blind_spots  personal_values  market_segmentation  mass_production  decreasing_returns_to_scale  aesthetics  eco-friendly  creating_demand  food  foodies  gourmet  large_companies 
january 2015 by jerryking
TMX’s Eccleston says Canadian exchanges need new technology - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 03 2014

The new head of TMX Group Ltd. says the stock exchange company needs to diversify and develop new technology products to help counter the impact of Canada’s highly cyclical commodity-dominated markets...“What we can’t do is simply let them all sit as totally separate entities,” he said. “They all run as verticals. But the challenge is how do you take those things and understand how to use the capabilities to create more integrated solutions that give you some competitive advantage?”...he needs to create a strategy for a portfolio of TMX businesses.

“I think it’s time to start thinking about TMX as not a group of exchanges and clearing businesses, but really a very strong technology-based organization that happens to manage exchanges, clearing businesses, risk-management business, data businesses and a number of other things,” he said.
TMX  Lou_Eccleston  product_development  stockmarkets  first90days  trading_platforms  bourses  Bay_Street  capabilities  competitive_advantage  diversification  new_products  portfolio_management  systems_integration 
december 2014 by jerryking
Wealth Managers Enlist Spy Tools to Map Portfolios - NYTimes.com
AUG. 3, 2014 | NYT | QUENTIN HARDY.

Karen White, Addepar’s president and chief operating officer, says a typical customer has investments at five to 15 banks, stockbrokers or other investment custodians.

Addepar charges based on how much data it is reviewing. Ms. White said Addepar’s service typically started at $50,000, but can go well over $1 million, depending on the money and investment variables involved.

And in much the way Palantir seeks to find common espionage themes, like social connections and bomb-making techniques, among its data sources,[jk: traffic_analysis] Mr. Lonsdale has sought to reduce financial information to a dozen discrete parts, like price changes and what percentage of something a person holds.

As a computer system learns the behavior of a certain asset, it begins to build a database of probable relationships, like what a bond market crisis might mean for European equities. “A lot of computer science, machine learning, can be applied to that,” Mr. Lonsdale said. “There are lessons from Palantir about how to do this.”
wealth_management  software  valuations  Quentin_Hardy  Addepar  Palantir  money_management  social_connectivity  machine_learning  correlations  portfolio_management  investment_custodians  tools 
august 2014 by jerryking
CPPIB buys Saskatchewan farms in $128-million deal - The Globe and Mail
ERIC ATKINS

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Dec. 12 2013

The portfolio of land generates returns through leases, price appreciation and some production-sharing agreements with growers. Agricultural commodities are expected to enjoy new demand as incomes rise in emerging markets and diets shift to more protein and high-value crops such as canola. At the same time, farmland has become prized for low price volatility.
CPPIB  Saskatchewan  farming  agriculture  private_equity  farmland  portfolio_management 
december 2013 by jerryking
For Most Small Companies Patents Are Just About Worthless -
10/04/2013 | Forbes | Todd Hixon

A widespread meme in the tech community holds that patents are a path to riches: an entrepreneur who solves a key technical problem and receives a patent can build a business on the technology and ride to glory. Xerox and Polaroid are celebrated examples (both now nearly extinct). But, IMHO, for most small companies today, patents are just about worthless. Many entrepreneurs misunderstand the value patents create, and how difficult they are to enforce........A patent is a sword, not a shield. It gives you the right to attack a competitor who makes commercial use of ("infringes") your patented technology. Contrary to common belief, it does not give you the right to practice your technology free of interference.....Patents are often quite narrow and hence can be circumvented: they might apply to a specific design element or combination of characteristics. They have effect only in the jurisdiction of the patent-granting authority: effective world coverage requires six to ten patents in different geographies......Enforcing your patent in the courts is a nightmare. Plan on 3-5 years and $3-$5 million to get to a judgment. And then there is the appeal ... Usually the stakes and time frame will be too much for a start-up. .......In the information technology world, patents have the most value in the hands of big companies, as part of patent “portfolios” so large that any competitor is bound to infringe some of them. They use this weapon to attack competitors (usually smaller ones) that lack patent portfolios: e.g., the lawsuits against Google ’s Android operating system. To defend itself, Google acquired Motorola, which owned a large relevant patent portfolio. Now Google can counter-sue. The usual result among the big companies is a stand-off, reciprocal licensing, or a patent pool wherein the major competitors share their patents, and new entrants are out in the cold.

My suggestions for a small technology companies*:

* Don’t base your business strategy on patents. And don’t try to raise money primarily on the basis of patents; most likely this will fail and you will appear naïve.
* It’s worthwhile to file patents for your key inventions in the U.S. (what patent-savvy universities do), but don’t go much beyond that.
* Pay close attention to patents that others hold which might enable competitors to block you. In my experience “freedom to operate” is more important when evaluating a business plan than patent ownership.
* It will rarely make sense for a small company to sue a big company for patent infringement. The lawyers will probably be the winners.
* Non-patent intellectual property strategies can hold off copycats effectively. Trade secrets (parts of the product or production technology that are hard for competitors to replicate), knowledge of customers, and superior rate of innovation work best.
* Build your business on real competitive advantages: product value-in-use, customer relationships, rapid innovation. Don’t count on patents to defend you from your competitors.
cross-licensing  patents  patent_litigation  portfolios  portfolio_management  offensive_tactics  pay_attention  small_business  start_ups 
october 2013 by jerryking
Don’t expect BlackBerry’s patents to stay in Canada - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Sep. 29 2013

The way to extract real value from BlackBerry’s IP is to use the patents in cross-licensing deals between tech companies, allowing players to use each others’ technologies. Patents can also be used in litigation – either on offence to protect turf, or to defend against infringement by others.
Blackberry  cross-licensing  defensive_tactics  intangibles  intellectual_property  IP_retention  litigation  patents  patent_infringement  patent_litigation  portfolios  portfolio_management  property_rights  offensive_tactics  sellout_culture  value_extraction 
october 2013 by jerryking
Taking Risk To the Marketplace
March 6, 2000 | Fortune Magazine | By Thomas A. Stewart.

* "You should always value the ability to move and change, because that creates options, and options are valuable,"
* Traditional risk management, with its emphasis on real property and financial events, isn't enough for knowledge companies, whose big risks are intellectual assets, such as brand equity, human capital, innovation, and their network of relationships.
* you have to know what's at risk-- which isn't always easy for intangible assets.
* Each intangible asset has a different risk profile.
*Thinking like a portfolio manager works for risk management as well as for strategy, says Bruce Pasternak, head of the strategic leadership practice at Booz Allen & Hamilton. In either case, adaptability is a cardinal virtue; the top goal is organizational flexibility. All-or-nothing bets like insurance have limited use in protecting cash flows from intangibles because their value is so uncertain, says Anjana Bhattacharee, director of Aporia, a British startup developing tools to manage those risks. Hedging also has problems. Says Bjarni Armannsson, head of the Icelandic Investment Bank in Reykjavik: "It's difficult to find a counterparty for intellectual risks." To hedge against falling gas prices, Enron can sell the risk to someone who fears rising prices, like a utility, but how do you hedge against a loss of expertise or brand equity

* Markets are full of risk, but it turns out that they're a lot safer than rigid structures. Intellectual assets and operations obey no one's command and are subject to discontinuous--i.e., quantum--change. There are four ways to respond to risk: Avoid it, reduce it, transfer it, or accept it. The one thing you can't do, if it's intellectual risk, is tie it up and subdue it.
Thomas_Stewart  risks  risk-management  organizational_flexibility  adaptability  binary_decisionmaking  intellectual_risks  human_capital  insurance  intellectual_assets  brand_equity  intangibles  networks  interconnections  discontinuities  expertise  portfolios  options  portfolio_management  cash_flows  generating_strategic_options  optionality  brittle  antifragility  step_change  counterparties  network_risk 
december 2012 by jerryking
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class - NYTimes.com
September 24, 2012, 1:21 pm4 Comments
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class
By STEVE LOHR

patents have become a new asset class.

Traditionally, patents sat on corporate shelves and were occasionally used as bargaining chips in cross-licensing deals with competitors. But that began to change in the 1990s, when technology companies like Texas Instruments and I.B.M. started to regard their patent portfolios as sources of revenue, licensing their intellectual property for fees.

Today, companies routinely buy and sell patents, mostly in deals that draw little attention, for millions of dollars instead of billions. The question, experts say, is how big the market will become.

“Patents are a tricky asset to trade,” said Josh Lerner, an economist at the Harvard Business School. “But there is clearly a huge amount of value in intellectual property. And I think what we’re seeing is the beginning of a lot more monetization and trading of intellectual property rights.”

A sizable specialist industry has developed to build the marketplace for trading ideas. The players include patent aggregators like Intellectual Ventures and RPX, patent brokers like Ocean Tomo and ICAP, hedge funds, investment banks and law firms.
property_rights  smartphones  patents  intellectual_property  law_firms  Steve_Lohr  valuations  Ocean_Tomo  markets  monetization  portfolio_management  cross-licensing  asset_classes 
september 2012 by jerryking
Google Bids for Nortel Patent Portfolio - WSJ.com
APRIL 5, 2011 | WSJ | By AMIR EFRATI And STUART WEINBERG.

Google Seeks Nortel Patents in Defensive Move. Google has bid $900 million for the broad patent portfolio held by bankrupt Canadian telecom equipment maker Nortel Networks, in an attempt to shield itself from current and future patent litigation.
auctions  Google  litigation  Nortel  patents  portfolios  portfolio_management 
july 2011 by jerryking
Google Bids for Nortel Patent Portfolio - WSJ.com
APRIL 4, 2011 | WSJ | By AMIR EFRATI. Google Inc. has bid
$900 million for the broad patent portfolio held by bankrupt Canadian
telecom equipment maker Nortel Networks Corp., in an attempt by the
Internet giant to shield itself from current and future patent
litigation. Google's general counsel, Kent Walker, said Monday on the
company's blog that Nortel selected Google as the "stalking horse"
bidder, meaning it will be the "starting point against which others will
bid prior to the auction," which is expected to be held in June.
Nortel has said it has about 6,000 patent and patent applications,
including 2,600 in the U.S., that cover a range of technologies
including computer science, wireless, Internet search and online social
networking.
Google  Nortel  patents  auctions  portfolios  portfolio_management 
april 2011 by jerryking
Fire Yourself -- Then Come Back and Act Like a New Boss Would
OCTOBER 9, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by CAROL HYMOWITZ.
..."companies must repeatedly reinvent themselves to stay
strong...companies can't survive as they once did by churning out the
same products or services in the same way year after year. The most
successful companies don't wait until they're in trouble or are
overtaken by rivals to make changes. The trick is to analyze portfolios
constantly, to move quickly to shed weak businesses and to gamble on new
opportunities without making the company unstable...."Windows of
opportunity open and close so quickly today, you can't just mull
decisions right in front of you. You have to look around the corner and
figure out where you need to go,...learn how to change directions fast.
...
IBM  Intel  Andy_Grove  reinvention  opportunities  nimbleness  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  accelerated_lifecycles  portfolios  pre-emption  kill_rates  portfolio_management  unstable  instability  assessments_&_evaluations  Carol_Hymowitz 
december 2009 by jerryking
Engineer a smooth takeover with five proven tips
https://hbr.org/2007/09/rules-to-acquire-by

09-17-2007 The Globe and Mail by Schachter, Harvey
MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS - Taken from "Rules to Acquire" By Bruce Nolop, of Pitney Bowles. FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2007 ISSUE of the Harvard Business Review.

A close look at the world’s most successful companies reveals that, in general, they rely heavily on acquisitions to achieve their strategic goals......acquisitions can be faster, cheaper, and less risky than organic expansion. It’s a seeming paradox, until you realize what’s going on: Some acquirers have figured out how to do it right. Many have not.......Pitney Bowes embarked on our acquisition program.....they believed that they should develop a disciplined approach to making acquisitions and learning from them as an organization......More than 70 acquisitions later, they have a process firmly in place.......What’s behind the program’s success? ....a due diligence checklist that now covers 93 separate points of concern.....and a few key guidelines.

* Stick to adjacent spaces

Too many companies reach far afield when making acquisitions......Pick acquisition targets that are logical extensions of your company's current business mix, so they can be taken on incrementally. Such additions take advantage of the organization's tacit strengths - management know-how, customer insights, and cultural orientation - that are often ignored by more grandiose strategists. And they keep your brand consistent...... a 2001 McKinsey study: adjacent acquisitions correlate with increased shareholder value, whereas diversification into non-related areas actually reduces shareholder value. ....Profit from the Core author Chris Zook, looked for patterns in 2,000 companies’ growth initiatives and concluded that adjacent moves were the most successful.......Q: Can you really add more value to the target company than any other acquirer can?

* Bet on portfolio performance

Manage acquisitions like an investment portfolio, trying for multiple smaller acquisitions rather than one or two gargantuan bets. He notes that a Bain & Company study found the economic returns from acquisitions are greater if the purchase represents 5 per cent or less of the acquirer's market capitalization - so smaller is better. A portfolio approach keeps acquisitions to manageable size and hedges the risk that any one will go awry, producing more predictable financial results over time.......The classic benefit of a portfolio strategy, whether for acquisitions or any other type of investment, is that it produces more-predictable financial results over time.

* Get a business sponsor--No exceptions!

A clearly defined leader has to be personally focused on executing the business plan for the acquisition, assuring revenue targets and those often-elusive cost synergies.

That sponsor must drive the behind-the-scenes infrastructure projects that are essential to operational success, such as the integration of IT systems and HR policies, and develop strong relationships with the newly acquired management teams to ensure talent retention.

This can't be left to a corporate development group - it must be in the hands of an individual who is held personally responsible for the acquisition's success, and who reports regularly to the CEO and the board.

* Be clear on how the acquisition will be judged

You need to know exactly what you are seeking - what do you mean, exactly, when you talk of growth potential, or market development, or near-term synergies? For bolt-on acquisitions, which neatly fit into a business or market, financial returns should be more short term, while it will take longer for those benefits to accrue when the acquisition is a platform that takes you into a new, albeit still adjacent, business space or activity.

* Don't shop when you're hungry

What applies at the supermarket applies in corporate acquisitions. If you buy when you are hungry, you're likely to grab more than you need and be less price sensitive. On a strategic level, hunger can occur when you are seeking a missing element that you feel is urgently needed. Also problematic are acquisitions made to compensate for poor performance in existing operations.
adjacencies  bolt-on  buying_a_business  buyer's_remorse  CAMEX  checklists  Chris_Zook  clarity  due_diligence  emotional_discipline  growth  guidelines  Harvey_Schachter  HBR  leadership  M&A  McKinsey  mergers_&_acquisitions  metrics  organizational_learning  paradoxes  Pitney_Bowes  platforms  portfolio_management  process-orientation  rules_of_the_game  tips 
march 2009 by jerryking

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