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jerryking : postcolonial   4

In 1967, the birth of modern Canada - The Globe and Mail
JAN. 02, 2017 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | DOUG SAUNDERS |

1967 is the hinge upon which modern Canadian history turns and, in certain respects, the key to understanding the challenges of the next half-century.

Today, we live in the country shaped by the decisions and transformations of 1967, far more than by the events of 1867.

Let me make the case, then, that 1967 was Canada’s first good year. We should spend this year celebrating not the 150 th year of Confederation, but the 50th birthday of the new Canada.

But let me also make the case that our conventional story about the birth of second-century Canada is largely wrong. We like to believe that starting in the late 1960s, a series of political decisions, parliamentary votes, court rulings and royal commissions descended upon an innocent, paternalistic, resource-economy Canada and forced upon it an awkward jumble of novelties: non-white immigration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, refugees, indigenous nationhood, liberation of women and gays, the seeds of free trade, individual rights, religious diversity.

But the explosions of official novelty that were launched in and around 1967 weren’t a cause; they were an effect of profound changes that had taken place in Canadians themselves during the two decades after the war, in their thinking and their composition and their attitude toward their country, in Quebec and English Canada and in indigenous communities.


There is a solid line leading from the events of 1967 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982: It was impossible to have a Canada of multiple peoples, as we discovered was necessary in the late 1960s, without having a Canada of individual people and their rights.

....Individual rights, Quebecois consciousness, indigenous shared-sovereignty status and cultural plurality weren’t the only inevitable outcomes of the 1967 moment. What Canada witnessed over the next two decades was a self-reinforcing spiral of events that often sprung directly from the centennial-era awakening of a postcolonial consciousness.
Doug_Saunders  anniversaries  1967  nostalgia  nationalism  '60s  turning_points  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Canada  Canada150  national_identity  aboriginals  postcolonial  symbolism  John_Diefenbaker  Lester_Pearson  multiculturalism  Quebecois  Quiet_Revolution  monoculturalism  land_claim_settlements  immigration  royal_commissions  sesquicentennial  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms  Confederation  retrospectives 
january 2017 by jerryking
The Real Legacy of Nelson Mandela - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 10, 2011

The Real Legacy of Nelson Mandela
The antiapartheid hero refused to launch a personality cult. Why have other African leaders failed to follow suit?....The postcolonial history of Africa has shown that liberation parties harvest a potent crop of "struggle" legitimacy that generally neutralizes opposition for a generation or so. During that time, the countervailing institutions of the new state tend to wither in their infancy, constitutions are swept aside and the civil service is politicized as lines blur between government and party.
Nelson_Mandela  South_Africa  humility  heroes  inspiration  personality_cults  African  sub-Saharan_Africa  legacies  authoritarianism  loyal_opposition  institutions  institution-building  civil_service  postcolonial 
december 2011 by jerryking
Nigeria’s Promise, Africa’s Hope - NYTimes.com
By CHINUA ACHEBE
Jan. 15, 2011

At the end of the day, when the liberty was won, we found that we had
not sufficiently reckoned with one incredibly important fact: If you
take someone who has not really been in charge of himself for 300 years
and tell him, “O.K., you are now free,” he will not know where to begin.

This is how I see the chaos in Africa today and the absence of logic in
what we’re doing. Africa’s postcolonial disposition is the result of a
people who have lost the habit of ruling themselves, forgotten their
traditional way of thinking, embracing and engaging the world without
sufficient preparation. We have also had difficulty running the systems
foisted upon us at the dawn of independence by our colonial masters.
Nigeria  Africa  corruption  development  accountability  postcolonial 
january 2011 by jerryking

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